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At St. Elizabeth Seton in Plano, they love Alinsky groups so much…. July 16, 2010

Posted by Tantumblogo in Dallas Diocese, foolishness, North Deanery, scandals.
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…..they give them office space.   Not necessarily a big shock, but for folks who attend Seton, I thought they might want to know that some of their parish office space is used by a Saul Alinsky Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF) front group, Collin County Area Interfaith, which was spun off from Dallas Area Interfaith.  Having justice and mercy for our neighbor is a core Catholic belief, but Industrial Areas Foundation and their numerous spin offs take that justice to mean that government should transfer wealth from one segment of society to another, taking a large cut off the top, some of which gets distributed to groups like the Industrial Areas Foundation.  It is no exaggeration to state that Industrial Areas Foundation advocates for socialism if not outright Marxism, which previous Popes have defined as being incompatible with the Catholic Faith.

One more thing – Industrial Areas Foundation groups are not “grass-roots;” they don’t spring up of their own accord, they are planned from the top down, in good Marxist fashion, by national leaders who identify areas they want to try to penetrate, then they recruit individuals into their organization.

Sound familiar?

That Seton Soles run you do every spring raises money for these groups.   The $135,000 raised so far with Seton Soles has been used largely to lobby local governments, much of it in close connection with Dallas Area Interfaith/Collin County Area Interfaith.  This is what is meant by “social justice.”  It never means directly helping the poor by providing medical care, or food, or clothing.  It means lobbying government to raise taxes or provide some perceived benefit to the poor.  This is the definition of social justice as the term is used on the Seton website.

UPDATE:  This is an awesome document that explains how IAF operates and infiltrates what it defines as “institutions,” like a church.  Like Seton.  Just so you know, as far as Industrial Areas Foundation is concerned, and Dallas Area Interfaith uses this same methodology, every single member of an institution that belongs to an IAF affiliate (Seton is a member of IAF affiliate Dallas Area Interfaith) is counted as a  member of that IAF affiliate.  So, Mr. and Mrs. Smith at Seton, you belong to the Industrial Areas Foundation, whose founding principle is to turn the United States into a Marxist country.  In this way, Dallas Area Interfaith (DAI) can claim to have “100,000” members, or whatever the case may be, because of the number of people who attend the churches that are part of DAI, when in reality they have an active membership of between 30-40 people.  Isn’t socialism fun?

Comments

1. Mary - July 16, 2010

So, your link says that IAF (of which DAI/CCI is a part) receives the largest percentage of grants from CCHD.

This makes me feel all warm and fuzzy about our church local leadership and their allocation of $$$, our money.

When did providing for the poor change from helping my neighbor (remember Jesus and his “who is your neighbor” sermon in Luke 10:34) to donating money to a pit for some “smarter than thou” group to determine which organization to next donate to? Was this a 60s thing as well???

Long time ago, when immigrants came to America they first put their time, treasure, and talents to building a beautiful, Christ-centered Church; they continued to help with it’s upkeep, decorating and such. (My ancestors build the St Anthony Church in Violet, my grandfather bought a beautiful statue for St Anthony’s in Harper.) Now we give money to our local parish and maybe a small percentage goes back into the church??? Will we ever really know where our money goes?

btw, here ( http://setonparish.org/index.cfm?load=page&page=272 ) Seton discusses CCI/DAI “accomplishments”.
More community organizing…

Tom - July 18, 2010

Since when did the church become a political action organization? How does the church explain its association with people, groups, or organizations that support policies contrary to the teachings of the Catholic church? Abortion, contraception, etc. are okay because some money is provided to the poor? Who is going to explain that to Jesus? Please explain it to me. Maybe I can use your explanation in my thought process to justify my evil thoughts and deeds. I have not heard any passage in the bible that says money forgives sinners or stops one from committing sin. I do recall many passages inferring the opposite, money corrupts. I think many priests and bishops are more into cultural issues rather than their vocation. Have you observed the corruption in our government with Acorn and the out of control spending? Do you not see all the organizations our government has influenced with changing the culture and specifically hostile to Catholic and christian religion? I highly recommend you watch the movie “The Passion of The Christ”. If you saw it, watch it again, and pay attention this time. Hopefully you will see the church leaders are corrupt and the government is both brutal and corrupt. We need all those with a vocation in the church, bishops, priests, nuns, etc. to bring society to Jesus. If they can do that, the problem will go away. As it stands today, society is going the WRONG WAY, aided by many with a vocation in the Catholic church. P.S. Listen to some of Bishop Sheen’s retreat presentations.

tantamergo - July 19, 2010

These are all good questions. I’m not in favor of this kind of ‘social justice.’ All Seton parishioners should know that their parish supports this kind of work very strongly, even though I know it costs them in terms of membership and donations. The pastor, Fr. Petter, is one of those who feels that the Church’s mission is very strongly biased towards this kind of lobby work.

2. Jan - July 19, 2010

Most of our Parishioners here at Seton are unaware of what or who their contrabutions are supporting. How do we get this information out there?

tantamergo - July 19, 2010

Tell your friends, and encourage them to tell theirs. Tell all who will listen. If you have an e-mail list with a number of Seton parishioners on it, you might want to send information to all involved. That’s commitment level 1. Commitment level 2 might be getting on parish committees try to spread the word and advocate against this kind of ‘social justice’ work. Commitment level 3 involves more risk and potential pain – you could hand out flyers before Mass, you could put up signs on your car detailing in brief what is going on, you can engage strangers in the narthex before or after Mass.

You could try to meet with Fr. Petter – it would be better if you showed up in a small group (5-10 people). Let him know you don’t support this, and don’t buy his quick dismissals.

There are many things that can be done. If you’re in any groups at Seton, I’d let all of the other members know, if they don’t already. That’s a good first step.


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