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SSPX bishop – Pope celebrates private EF Mass July 19, 2010

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, General Catholic, Latin Mass.
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Via Fr.Z, an article that quotes Bishop Bernard Fellay stating that the Pope, and his secretary George Gaenswein (who Crescat slobbers over constantly), celebrate the Mass according to the 1962 Missale Romanum, commonly called the Extraordinary Form or Traditional Latin Mass.  Bishop Fellay says that the Holy Father even assists at Msgr. Gaenswein’s Mass celebrations, which would be indicative of the Holy Father’s great humility. 

Bishop Fellay makes several other interesting comments, some of which seem to be either hyperbole or wrong (priests in France being assigned to 60 different parishes simultaneously), and some of which seems rather plausible.  One of the more plausible comments – there are bishops throughout the world blocking the celebration of the EF Mass, and even an Italian bishop who exclaimed he would resign if the Pope ever celebrated this ancient form of the Mass.  I believe that at face value, and I doubt he would be alone.  As to whether there are bishops who may be blocking the efforts of priests and groups of lay people who wish to celebrate the Traditional Latin Mass, my experience has shown this is likely the case, and is quite widespread. 

Sometimes we may wonder at certain episcopal appointments, or about the seeming tolerance for certain subtle and not-so-subtle forms of dissent, and wonder how this can be.  We may think, why doesn’t the Pope do something about this?  I don’t think we know the limitations the Pope operates under, or the pressures put on him by various factions.  I’m reading Msgr. Gherardini’s excellent book on Vatican II, and one point he makes early on is the cloudiness introduced into the lines of authority in the Church by Vatican II.  I had a diocesan priest relay this to me as well in a catechist training class, that the former clear situation of Pope above/bishops below was very intentionally muddied at Vatican II, and since then we have a number of ordinaries who feel that they are essentially little popes.  They don’t feel necessarily bound by any edict from Rome, which was a major goal of those who threw out the schema produced before Vatican II – the undermining of the authority of the Pope and the Curia.  That mission has been accomplished, and the Pope is now limited in what he can do in the face of open dissent.  What I wonder is whether the Pope will listen to the various appeals and consider re-examining all aspects  of Vatican II in the light of Tradition?  I think it’s worth a few prayers to ask that he does.

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