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Six Texas episcopal parishes to become Catholic June 30, 2011

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, Ecumenism, General Catholic, North Deanery, Society.
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Yay!

 A few days after news of the return to full communion with the Catholic Church by an entire Episcopalian community (Anglican of the States) of Saint Luke, in Bladenburg (Maryland), a new “transition” takes place:  This time it’s in Texas, where six Anglican parishes are going to embrace the faith of Rome.

The confirmation comes from Monsignor Mark Langham, head of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity:  «For at least ten years these communities have expressed a desire for full communion with Rome. Now they too will become part of the Ordinariate foreseen by the  Apostolic Constitution  Anglicanorum coetibus to accommodate former Anglican pastors and faithful».

In fact, in the U.S. as well there is a study on the birth of a canonical structure (an ordinariate, in fact) modeled on that of Our Lady of Walsingham in England and Wales that is bringing many Anglican pastors and faithful to become fully integrated into the local Catholic community. The Ordinariate allow Anglicans to maintain some traditions, especially in the areas of liturgy, prayers, songs, all expressed in a “high”, almost Shakespearean  language.  Furthermore, for former pastors who are married there is a special “permit” that authorizes them to maintain the marriage bond.

But what are the underlying causes of this separation, in both England and the U.S.? Bishop Langam has no doubts: “The reason is to be found in the faithfulness of the communities to apostolic tradition.  Some recent developments in Anglicanism such as priesthood for women and the opening on issues such as homosexuality, are perceived as unacceptable».

It still amazes me that, having seen the wreckage caused by the modernist, progressive agenda pursued in the Anglican, presbyterian, methodist, and other churches, there are still Catholics who want nothing more than to follow that course.  Forget Doctrine, why, on a practical level, would you want to do something that has failed so badly? What motivations could one have?  It can’t be for the ‘truth,’ because the Church already has the fullness of that.

It must be something

 

Comments

1. JenZ - July 1, 2011

Have you seen a list of the parishes anywhere? I just did a search and couldn’t find any names. I was surprised to see on Wikipedia, however, that of the 14 Anglican Use parishes and missions listed in the US (which does not include the parish in MD), 5 are in Texas already!

2. JeffO - July 2, 2011

The list does not include the parish in Maryland any longer, since St. Luke’s has been taken in under the Diocese of Washington. Stay tuned for information on the 5 Anglican parishes in Texas.

An Anglo/Parish: St. Luke’s is a traditional Anglican parish in the Diocese of Washington DC. With the vast majority of Anglicans around the world, we affirm the Church’s teaching as witnessed to in the Creeds, warranted by Scripture and assented to by reason.
4002 53rd Street
Bladensburg, Maryland 20710
Tel: 301-927-6466

JeffO - July 2, 2011

That is, An Anglo/Catholic Parish: St. Luke’s is a traditional Anglican parish in the Diocese of Washington DC. With the vast majority of Anglicans around the world, we affirm the Church’s teaching as witnessed to in the Creeds, warranted by Scripture and assented to by reason.
4002 53rd Street
Bladensburg, Maryland 20710
Tel: 301-927-6466

3. JeffO - July 2, 2011

Two of the Parishes are:

1) St Mary the Virgin Catholic Church, Use Catholic

1408 N Davis Dr
Arlington, TX 76012
(817) 460-2278

Bishop Paul S. Loverde
______________________________________

2) Our Lady of Walsingham Catholic Church / Anglican Use
7809 Shadyvilla Lane
Houston, Texas 77055 – http://www.walsingham-church.org
______________________________________
His Eminence Daniel Cardinal DiNardo, Catholic Archbishop
Archdiocese Galveston-Houston

The term Anglican Use has two meanings. First, it refers to parish churches primarily made up of former Episcopalians, members of the United States’ branch of the Anglican Communion, who have joined the Catholic Church (in particular, the Latin Rite). These parishes maintain some of the features of Anglicanism and have been established in the Catholic Church under the Pastoral Provision of 1980 issued by Pope John Paul II.

4. JeffO - July 2, 2011

Second meaning of Anglican Use refers to the particular form of worship used in those churches, which is found in the Book of Divine Worship. The liturgy can be used outside of Anglican Use parishes with the proper permission from the local Roman Catholic bishop.

tantamergo - July 3, 2011

Jeff –

Many thanks for the informative comments. I’ve assisted at Our Lady of the Atonement in San Antonio many times. It’s the first Anglican use parish in the US. God bless!


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