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Catholics give less money to Church than any other religion…. February 2, 2012

Posted by Tantumblogo in Dallas Diocese, General Catholic, Interior Life, North Deanery, sadness, Virtue.
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….at least among Christians.  0.7%?  Are you kidding?  That’s $6.75 a week for a family making $50k a year, and who assists at Mass every week.  The critical data is the bar graph at the bottom.

No wonder Catholics are so eager to embrace government mandated “charity?” 

Am I going to lose readers for posting this?  No doubt, much of the very low donation ratio is due to many Catholics assisting at Mass so rarely.

I understand that not everyone can give a full 10% of gross, although I think perhaps we should try a bit harder.  But I do believe that there are too many Catholics who are still putting the same $X bill in the basket every week they did 20 years ago.  Yes, this is intensely personal, and may make folks mad, but my family and I do give to the point that it hurts, somewhat.  We’ve also been blessed to have a certain amount of excess income, which not everyone has, but I can say that we give beyond that.  We are denying ourselves and our kids quite a bit in our support of the Church.  We do it for love, because God has given us everything we have, and we owe Him something of what He has given us back, for His Church.  But this is not anything wonderful we’ve done.  Even this desire to give, is Grace. 

I also get that many folks may go to a parish where they don’t feel comfortable handing over large sums of money to dubious purposes.  Then MOVE!  That was a large part of the reason we switched where we assist at Sunday Mass – we can’t give money to a parish that supports an Alinsky-ite group, or that brings in heterodox speakers, or teaches heterodox beliefs in formational programs, or that has clergy that undermines Church Doctrine or abuses the Mass.  Sorry to be so harsh, but that’s simply the case.  That’s why many folks made large donations to San Juan Bautista in El Paso – they felt their money would be “safe,” and would go to a holy purpose they agreed with.  They did not agree with many things occurring in the El Paso Diocese, many heterodox things.  And now Fr. Rodriguez is being sued because of disputes over some of this money.   If you want to effect change in a parish or diocese, stop giving money on a broad scale, with a little note stating why, and things will change, and rapidly.  But make sure you continue to support the Church as a whole, through some orthodox religious order or somesuch, in lieu of giving to a certain parish or diocese.

Getting ready to watch my follower count drop!  Sorry!

Comments

1. Teresa Rice - February 2, 2012

I agree. Spot on!

2. Cori - February 3, 2012

Dang, you rock! I hope everyone on earth reads this. See you on the 11th.

3. Kathie - February 3, 2012

Who did the survey? Was it random all across the USA including equal amounts of city and rural locations? Are they including people who say they are Catholic but haven’t attended Mass in 25 years?

4. Catechist Kevin - February 3, 2012

Tantam,

Well, I had been mulling giving more – there, you just did it for me!

I have no problem with what you said.

Catechist Kevin

5. Obama press secretary threatens to de-fund the Church? « A Blog for Dallas Area Catholics - February 3, 2012

[…] In the context of a question regarding the controversy that has erupted between the Church and the administration, a statement like the one above could be taken as a veiled threat, reminding the bishops (and especially, the USCCB) of just how much they depend on the good will of the administration when it comes to funding they depend on so very, very much.  Funding they have come to see as a wonderful, regular, inflation-adjusted substitute to the donations of the faithful, which are always a hassle to raise, variable, and somewhat dependent on how the faithful view the Church and bishops at any given point.  Far easier just to enjoy the federal teet, idn’t it?  I think this great dependence on federal funding for so many Church related activities is one reason, among many, why Catholics give so little.  […]

6. James - February 5, 2012

There is a parish not far from me that has a reputation for liturgical abuses, which is why I drive down the road to another parish – the extra 10-15 minutes is worth it.

It’s important to know where the money is going. I gave zero dollars to the Catholic Campaign for Human Development, and there is a “Catholic” college I attended way back when where I ceased donations 12 years ago because I didn’t agree with the direction of the president, who is still there. Any money I would donate there I send directly to the Catholic Student Center at Texas A&M University, where the authenticity there never stops bringing new students (universities need to take note).

One rule of tithing 10% that I was given by a former pastor was 5% to the parish, 1% to the diocese, and 4% to other. I may not make the 5% total or the 1% total, even though I do give money weekly to my parish. However, I also give money to certain religious orders such as the Fathers of Mercy and the Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist, as well as donations to some pro-life groups. The two orders mentioned herein are upholding the church’s teachings, and the money I give to the Fathers of Mercy goes to seminary education.

I also donate money to the Archdiocese for the Military Services, whose priests are “on loan” from dioceses and some religious orders. The Archdiocese for the Military Services receives no additional government funding, and Archbishop Broglio is trying hard to get more priests, and the Archbishop was very vocal on the danger of repealing “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”. Many of the Catholics priests I have met serving our military are good positive “manly” role models for the younger generation they serve — the average age of our Armed Forces is under 30.

Honestly, I would not give money for education where “dumb it down” is the norm, and I wouldn’t give money to say, a youth ministry whose prime interest is purely social. It’s important to know what the money is being used for.


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