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Seder Meals violate the First Commandment February 18, 2013

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Basics, disaster, Ecumenism, episcopate, error, foolishness, General Catholic, Interior Life, Papa, scandals, secularism.
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This is a 19 minute sermon where a priest points out whole litany of reasons why Catholics should never participate in a Seder Meal, which is a Jewish passover meal that many Catholics have taken up as some kind of pious practice in association with this time of year.  It’s a very bad idea.   Readers should never get involved in one of these, and if you took part in one in the past in ignorance, I would counsel informing your confessor of the instances when this occurred and the circumstances surrounding those instances.  That’s not condemnatory in the slightest, but if you listen I think you’ll understand that these Seder meals are not only obsolete in the New Law but are directly counter to it.

http://www.audiosancto.org/auweb/20080928-Seder-Meals-Violate-the-1st-Commandment.mp3

“All religious ceremonies are professions of faith in which the interior worship of God exists.” If a man makes a false declaration of faith by taking part in a pagan rite or one of the old Jewish law, he is committing a very grievous sin – this priest describes it as a mortal sin.

That priest is the best sermonist I’ve ever heard. It is a profound indication of the utter state of collapse in which the Church presently suffers that this priest is one of only a handful I know that will address a specific action as being gravely sinful.  And say so.  How else, in our present culture, are souls to learn what is sinful, or not?

But the really sad fact of the matter is that so many priests today believe, essentially, in universal salvation.  Why get hassled by people you’ve <gasp!> made to feel bad because you spoke of sin, when everyone, or everyone short of Adolf Hitler, goes to Heaven?

This sermon, of course, opens very troubling questions over those priests and prelates who have participated in ecumenical services from some separated sect or other religious body.

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Comments

1. Theresa - February 18, 2013

Here in the Boston archdiocese it has become common practice for Cardinal O`Malley to participate in Seder meals along with parishoners of various parishes. I`m sure much of the confusion has been due to the actions of the past two Pontificates where ecumenism has replaced Traditional church teaching. Prehaps this audio could be sent to Rome? This priest is truly worth his weight in gold ( the spiritual kind) .

2. Jeannee - February 18, 2013

Yes, I agree with you completely that those teaching homily’s in the seminaries should be regenerated, so that priests speak of specific sins and specific items in the news (and etc) rather than pablum and sound bites that could come from anywhere when they are up there.

That said, I’m not quite sure this is it – I mean, really?! To me it sticks in my throat as when I read the volumes written from the Necedah, Wisconsin shrine site and hit against their railings about “Yid’s” & etc.

tantamergo - February 18, 2013

You sort of lost me in the second half. What is this shrine, and what are they railing about?

3. Steve B - February 19, 2013

Tantamergo,

As usual, fantastic post!

In the Fall 2012 edition of Latin Mass Magazine, in his article “Professions of Faith: The Perennial Value of Ceremony”, Dr. Michael Foley expounds upon teachings from the Angelic Doctor of the Church – St. Thomas Aquinas – for this very topic (albeit in a more general way).

“… for by fulfilling them [the ceremonial precepts of the Old Covenant] He [Christ] did abolish them (ST Ia-IIae.107.2.ad 1, ad 4). The ceremonial precepts, such as the rubrics for the Temple liturgy and the rules governing ritual purity, were designed to foreshadow the coming of the Messiah. Once the Messiah has come, these precepts are automatically nullified: indeed, Aquinas goes so far as to state that observing the ceremonies of the Old Law after the time of Christ’s Passion is a mortal sin (see ST 1a-IIae.103.4). The reason for this is that unlike the moral precepts [e.g. the Ten commandments], which are reflected in the natural law and are therefore perennially valid, the ceremonial precepts have the character of a promise, and once a promise is fulfilled, it no longer exists (ST Ia-IIae.107.2.ad 1). Persisting in the practice of the old Hebrew rites is therefore tantamount to denying that God has kept his promise to Abraham and the Fathers in the person of Jesus Christ.”

So, the practice of the Jewis seder meal by Catholics must stop!

But, will the “ecumenitis in the Church” since Vatican II allow for that???

Pax et benedictiones tibi, per Christum Dominum nostrum,

Steve B

4. Thomas - February 19, 2013

Who is the priest speaking?

5. Kirsten Houseknecht - February 19, 2013

as a convert to Catholicism…
i totally agree, with the reservation that one should be respectful and considerate of other beliefs, but that doesn’t mean SHARING them.

people who were hostile to my beliefs (including many Catholics) got hostility back, and just made me dig in my heels… people who simply were kind, and polite, but made clear their faith was different? that got my attention (it was the Rosary that won me over, finally)

we should be especially respectful to our Jewish brothers and sisters, of course! this doesnt mean becoming Jewish, or celebrating their religious rituals

6. supertradmum - February 19, 2013
tantamergo - February 19, 2013

He doesn’t seem to have a strong opinion either way. I’ll go with the priest on the audio. There is no sufficient reason to partake in a seder for a Catholic that outweighs the potential or real spiritual danger.

7. Audio Sancto - February 19, 2013

tantamergo: would you please contact me at http://www.audiosancto.org/contact — thanks!

tantamergo - February 19, 2013

Oh, I’ll delete it.

8. Raul De La Garza III (@raul_delagarza) - February 20, 2013

I am reminded of a related matter. There has been a discussion running through one of the Catholic home school groups relating to the issue on whether or not one may use chicken broth while cooking. The arguments for and against have been very animated. It has been really quite surprising and a little amusing as well. C’mon, folks. It’s chicken broth. Pray, listen to your conscience and the guidance given by the Holy Spirit and take action. ‘Nuff said.


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