jump to navigation

Habemus Papam! March 13, 2013

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Papa, sanctity, Society, true leadership.
trackback

We have a Pope. Awaiting the announcement on who it is right now, but I am guessing Scola.

I’ll be updating this post to try to liveblog the announcement.  I feel a weight off my shoulders already. You can watch the announcement live on FoxNews and other places.

The light is on in the Papal apartment. It’s getting closer!

Please, Lord, let it be:

burke

I had never noticed the shell-shaped stairs at the front of St. Peter’s before!

Here it is!  The announcement!

AAAHHHH!  The connection dropped out right when the name was said!  Who was it?!?

It’s Bergoglio!  Whoa.  Shocker!  He took the name Francis I.  I know very little.

He is the first non-European Pope in at least about 1600 years, and the first from the Americas. Boy, Latin America needs A LOT of attention because the Faith is in free fall there, this is interesting.  He looks a little like Pius XII!  God bless him!  How wonderful!  How stupid we all are, you know!  Scola and Americans and all that, how funny.  Thank you, Lord!

I think it gerat he chose his own name!  I can’t believe there is no sound on EWTN! Grrr!

francis

He is 76, though. I guess “young” is a relative term!  And as far as dealing with the problems in the Curia, I guess we’ll see.  Still, there is time for that, later. For now, we have a Pope!

And thanks to Kevin for the additional biographical information.  There is some on Wikipedia, he seems pretty orthodox – they had his name updated and some bio added within 30 seconds of the announcement!

Rorate Caeli is reporting that the new Pope Francis I was rather hostile to the traditional Mass in Buenos Aires.  Apparently, as Cardinal Bergoglio, he finished 2nd in the 2005 Conclave.

Ruh-roh.

RUH-ROH!

Ah, well, there were also photos of Pope Benedict XVI taking part in a Lutheran simulacrum of the Mass, whatever they call it.  Service.

 

Comments

1. MAM - March 13, 2013

Yes!

2. Dan - March 13, 2013

Thanks be to God. Thank you Mama Mary.

3. Catechist Kev - March 13, 2013

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Pope Francis.

Born: Dec. 17, 1936, in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Education: Studied at Theological Faculty of San Miguel. Received licentiate in philosophy.

Ordained for the Jesuits on Dec. 13, 1969.

Languages: Besides his native Spanish, Bergoglio also speaks Italian and German.

Bergoglio became known for personal humility, doctrinal conservatism and a commitment to social justice. A simple lifestyle has contributed to his reputation for humility. He lives in a small apartment, rather than in the palatial bishop’s residence. He gave up his chauffeured limousine in favor of public transportation, and he reportedly cooks his own meals.

Catechist Kev - March 13, 2013
tantamergo - March 13, 2013

Yeah, I know, I’ve seen. I don’t know all these little details of papal dress and actions that our new Pope apparently skipped, but there have now been several reports from Argentines there that the Pope has been quite hostile to the TLM. Fortunately, the TLM parish I assist at has been around for 23 years, it’s not dependent on Summorum Pontificum.

Catechist Kev - March 13, 2013

I *really* do not understand the hostility against the TLM. ??

I just don’t. I have only assisted at 1 in my lifetime, but gee-whiz it is beyond me why so many loathe it so.

FWIW, thanks to blogs like this one, Philothea’s, SuperT’s, and Fr. Z’s I am more and more drawn to it. If only th eclosest one weren’t an hour and a half away from me. 😦

Steve B - March 13, 2013

Kev,

The hostility/discrimination exhibited toward the TLM is because its opponents see it (and those who’ve embraced it) as rejecting lock-stock-and-barrel the reforms of Vatican II.

They see the TLM and us traditionalists as those who wish to “turn back the clock to 1962”, and we are disdainfully stereotyped at virtually every opportunity.

In brief, they see the TLM & traditional Catholics as a threat to their “reforms”….

Pax et benedictiones tibi, per Christum Dominum nostrum,

Steve

skeinster - March 14, 2013

And as with most stereotypes, there’s a grain of truth there. Or was.
But time keeps rolling on, and Fr. Z’s biological solution will eventually bear the reformers and their opponent peers away. Then the less emotionally involved can sort things out.

4. Joseph - March 13, 2013

In the pit of my stomach….somethings seems wrong and I have a bad feeling.

5. Heather N - March 13, 2013

‎: The Bishop of Rome is a Jesuit? Well, then, it’s official: We are all now more Catholic than the pope! 😉

Joseph - March 13, 2013

I am not familiar with the Jesuits history…can you give me a brief explanation about them? Thanks.

tantamergo - March 13, 2013

Uhh, they were for 400 years the backbone of the Church, defending Doctrine and fighting heresy everywhere, the most dreaded and feared order by all enemies of the Church. But starting in the 50s they absorbed the modernism rampant in the Church and went totally, completely off the rails in the 60s, so that the order will hardly exist in another 20 or 30 years due to a dirth of vocations. They are probably as radical a religious order as there is, overall.

Joseph - March 13, 2013

Thanks for the explanation. It is worrisome to say the least…I talked with a few catholics at work today. Not a single one knew anything about the TLM or that there was a different mass. Much less about the liturgy etc…sad sad sad. Guess I should start going to a Eastern rite mass?

tantamergo - March 13, 2013

I don’t know, they have their own problems. The best bet is a TLM, but if that’s not available, you’ve got to discern what is best for you and your family, if you have one.

David - March 14, 2013

In 2003, 100 out of 250 Jesuits from the New Orleans province were 70 or older. This was mentioned one Sunday at Mass because my parish was once staffed by Jesuits from the New Orleans Province.

Today, I have heard that the John Paul II generation novices are more orthodox than the establishment. When the attrition takes over, the Jesuits may experience a renewal in 25 years. I do know in 2008 a new superior was elected (the old superior reached retirement age), and the new superior is more orthodox.

I also think certain Jesuit provincials were more liberal than others. I heard the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley in the 70’s and 80’s was horrible, and my perception is that the New England province had a reputation for dissent. I’ve also heard horror stories about St. Joseph’s College in Philadelphia (mostly in the 90’s), a Jesuit institution, where things like “rainbow week” and masses with wonderbread have been celebrated in the past (???)

I don’t know about Chicago or St. Louis, but I did meet a good Jesuit about 12 years ago from the Washington, D.C. province who serves the Air Force. I also know of a Jesuit who served in the Navy, and I don’t know if he asked his provincial for permission to serve the Navy in order to find his own assignment. Good Jesuits like Fr. Mitch Pacwa and Fr. Fessio have had to find their own assignments. Fr. Pacwa (I have met him several times) is a good orthodox priest.

I don’t know about Jorge Cardinal Bergoglio, but I heard he does not like “liberation theology”, which is a plus. Now that he is Pope Francis I, we will just have to be patient and take things one day at a time. I too was praying for Raymond Cardinal Burke.

For what it is worth, Crisis magazine had an article about the future of the Jesuits sometime between 2005 and 2007 that was insightful. It was written by Russell Shaw.

David - March 14, 2013

I didn’t attend a Jesuit institution (I went to public high school), but I did attend a college that was affiliated with the Marianists (the Society of Mary founded by Fr. Joseph Chaminade, not the Marists) in the late 1980’s. Looking back, the Marianists went through some “watering down”, and many of the younger brothers did not stay. My college experience there was similar to going to a small secular institution.

That said, I wouldn’t be surprised if the Marianists are gone (at least from the United States and Canada) within the next 20-25 years. Quite frankly, I haven’t even heard of them getting new vocations. At least with the Jesuits, I’ve heard that in some provinces, the younger JPII novices, scholastics, and priests are really shaking up the older guys, and that is a positive.

tantamergo - March 13, 2013

Bwaa-haaa-haaaa! That was good!

6. skeinster - March 14, 2013

Thanks be to God! A surprise, but hopefully a good one.
If people can temper their expectations, I pray he will do very well.

I was watching the grands (ages 4-11) with EWTN on, and they were fascinated, when they weren’t bored. They now know a lot more about the Popes,cardinals, conclaves, the universality of the Church, St. Peter’s and the Sistine Chapel than mega-church kids usually do.
I was reminded of how a neighbor explained the ’63 election to me over Life magazine- another mite added to my interest in the Church. Maybe a good omen for us?


Sorry comments are closed for this entry

%d bloggers like this: