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Powerful sermon on the crisis afflicting the Church October 29, 2013

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, error, General Catholic, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, sanctity, secularism, self-serving, Tradition, Virtue.
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Is the present crisis afflicting the Church – what this amateur student of Church history believes is the gravest, deepest, and most diabolical series of events in the entire history of the Church – a Divine chastisement on the Church for Her unfaithfulness?  Or is it merely the actions of lost and fallen men who have embraced the errors of the world and somehow, through some open window, loosed the smoke of satan in the Church?  My personal view is that the answer is yes, that is both, but the priest in the sermon below presents a strong argument that what the Church is experiencing is a Divine chastisement and thus God’s Will, just as the ancient Hebrews were afflicted with various setbacks and then the final Babylonian devastation of their land, for their unfaithfulness.  This is a sermon very much worth listening to, even though I would counsel that sometimes, to get out of the forest, one does have to mind the trees:

http://www.audiosancto.org/auweb/20131027-Spiritual-Contraception.mp3

I think the points about focusing on our personal sanctification, and not complaining so much or, God forbid, losing hope and giving up, are very valid, but I do think the priest might have inadvertantly lost sight of the understanding that there are millions upon millions of Catholics out there who have no conception of the crisis presently devastating the Church.  It is easy to get too focused on blaming the hierarchy or the Council or whatever, and turn into a bitter unvirtuous person, but at the same time I have learned that the vast majority of Catholics have no idea that there might be problematic aspects to Pope Y, or Bishop X, or, especially, the most recent Council.  Most Catholics don’t even know the Precepts of the Faith or the works of mercy anymore, how are they going to know which theological currents are dangerous and need opposing, or at least rejection?

As I said, the answer is really both – there have been men, perhaps even of the best will, who have inflicted horrific errors on the Church through various means, errors which have caused the crisis we see.  Those errors must be pointed out and opposed.

But at the same time, I cannot argue with the main conclusion, which is that what the Church needs now more than anything, is Saints.  In point of fact, recent pontiffs have worried about the lack of Saints the Church has produced in the past century or so, and that is partially why we have seen the evaluation process for sanctification so watered down in recent years.  Even with that, there is a dearth of recent Saints.

But perhaps what the Spirit intends, is that great Saints be raised up through Grace and the traditional practice of the Faith.  Nothing would serve to restore the Faith better than several dozen very good, holy, traditional Catholics giving witness to the world.  So, the focus on virtue and personal sanctification is definitely well needed, but at the same time, we must also reach out to our brethren in need and continue to oppose what we know to be the first causes for the crisis.

Your thoughts?

Comments

1. Woody - October 29, 2013

Crisis? What crisis? There ain’t no stinkin’ crisis!

2. skeinster - October 30, 2013

I think the points about focusing on our personal sanctification, and not complaining so much or, God forbid, losing hope and giving up, are very valid, but I do think the priest might have inadvertantly lost sight of the understanding that there are millions upon millions of Catholics out there who have no conception of the crisis presently devastating the Church.

But Father wasn’t addressing millions upon millions of Catholics- he was talking to us, many of whom obsess unhealthily upon the crisis in the Church. That was his whole point, as I understood it. For the majority of us, going over the same ground again and again is futile, and wastes time and energy better spent in other ways- like prayer and good works. You have an obvious calling to inform, so you’re probably excluded. The rest of us? Stay informed as needed, and get back to work. As Father said in last week’s equally excellent sermon- leave the ecclesiastical p@rn alone.

Personal sanctity is not just valid- it is essential. But it does not mean holing up in your prayer closet (unless you have a calling to be a hermit), and I don’t think that’s what Father said.

The most important take-away from this, to me, is that sin causes chastisement, which will fall on the innocent and guilty alike, so stop sinning. And that is how you fix the present crisis in the Church.
So, imho, any discussion of the crisis that doesn’t include the plan- personal sanctity- is pretty much just disaster-mongering.

(And look- I understand that for people coming into the EF community, there is a certain amount of shock, disillusionment with prior experience, anger and grief. That’s natural and understandable. The problem is getting stuck and going around in the same circle forever. Acknowledge, forgive, move on. Don’t waste your precious time.)

3. The false gods in today’s Church | A Blog for Dallas Area Catholics - November 1, 2013

[…] false gods.  This theme dominates the whole Old Testament.  [And that was somewhat the point of the sermon I posted on Tuesday.  That we as a Church are being chastised for how unfaithful we have collectively […]


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