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Guide to help attain the TLM in your parish August 25, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in attachments, Basics, episcopate, General Catholic, Latin Mass, Liturgy, persecution, priests, sadness, scandals, secularism, Tradition, Virtue.
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The Latin Mass Society has a helpful guide available to souls desiring more access to the TLM, perhaps in their own parish.  The main portion of the guide is here.  Not only are there some general recommendations copied below, but also much discussion of common objections raised by opponents of the TLM and how to do with the stonewalling and opposition frequently encountered. I know many readers have lamented lack of availability of the TLM in their diocese or local area – this guide may help you to see that pastoral need addressed.  And just because your diocese already has a TLM, or even a TLM-specific parish, doesn’t mean you don’t have the right to ask for the Mass in your local area!

Under Summorum Pontificum, every lay person has the right to request the TLM, every priest has the right to publicly offer the TLM, and priests and bishops are to do all they can to accede to every reasonable request for the TLM from the faithful. We all know that is not how it works in practice, but with much patience and prayer, there has been a good deal of positive growth in the availability of the Traditional Mass.

The step-by-step guide, below:

1. Establish a ‘stable group’. Members of the group do NOT have to reside in the same parish. They do NOT have to have an attachment to the Traditional Mass going back to 1969. They must rather be a group sufficiently committed and sufficiently local that if a Mass were established for them, they would support it. There is no minimum size fixed for such groups, but to be taken seriously you need to show that numbers are at least in double figures. Your local Latin Mass Society Representative should be informed at this stage and should be able to put you in touch with other people who will support your project. [Well I don’t know if many places in the US have a local LMS representative.  But I’m sure you can contact them to find out.  I will say, when we asked for a Novus Ordo Latin Mass, we had dozens of names, and good attendance until a completely unnecessary controversy over the reception of the Blessed Sacrament from an Extraordinary Minister brewed up.  Then it went into the tank and never recovered, but such would never occur at a TLM]

2. Write to the parish priest. You need to choose a parish either where most of the members of your group live, or one where an additional Mass would be easiest to establish (i.e. one where there are not too many Sunday Masses taking place already), or one where the priest is most friendly to your cause. If this Parish Priest is unable to help you it will be up to the Bishop to suggest to nearby parishes that they may accommodate your group if that is the best way forward.  [I will say two things.  In most dioceses, expect a huge amount of pushback. Most dioceses are not complying with the provisions of Summorum Pontificum, and treat the matter as if availability of the TLM depends on some kind of gracious indult from the bishop.  That is very different from how SP reads, but that’s the reality.  In addition, picking a parish where you know, with certainty, there is a priest who desires to offer the TLM himself is key, especially a pastor. If it is simply the vicar, and a young one at that, but the pastor is opposed, you are unlikely to make any headway]

3. Include with your letter a simple petition in its support (‘We the undersigned support this request for a Sunday Mass in the X area celebrated in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite’), and get all the members of your group to sign it, and include their postal addresses. KEEP COPIES OF WHAT YOU SEND[Indeed]

4. If the parish priest does not respond within a fortnight, send your letter to him again; it may have got lost or forgotten about. Politely suggest that if you do not hear back from him within a month you will take the matter to the bishop, in accordance with the provisions of the Motu Proprio. [Good advice]

5. If you receive a negative response, you may be able (politely) to help your parish priest to overcome any misunderstandings about the Motu Proprio with the aid of the FAQs below. If his response remains negative, or if he does not respond at all, you must write to the bishop explaining that you have applied for the Traditional Mass under the Motu Proprio and are passing the matter to him as the Motu Proprio requires. Include with your letter to the bishop a copy of your letter(s) to the Parish Priest, and your petition.

6. With the Bishop, as with the Parish Priest in step 4 and 5: if there is no response after a fortnight, write again with a month deadline. If there are objections based on a misreading of the Motu Proprio, you may be able to respond with the help of the FAQs below. If, finally, there is a negative response or no response at all, you need to write to the Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei.

7. For this step, you should get in touch with the Latin Mass Society office. We will advise you on the wording of your letter, and we can arrange hand delivery in Rome, which will give your letter more force. You will need to include with your letter all your previous correspondence: letters to and from the parish priest and the bishop. [Great advice, and a step I never took.  I strongly recommend going this route if you encounter stonewalling]

It is of the utmost importance that all of the letters from your side are polite, succinct, clearly written, and well informed about the Motu Proprio. [And don’t rant about the Novus Ordo]

Will you get a response? The PCED may, or may not, acknowledge your letter. They will read it, however, and they will be in touch with your Bishop. They will seek to negotiate with the Bishop, and this may take time, and may result in an offer from the Bishop of a Mass in a different church than originally anticipated, in a rota of churches, or with some other arrangement. Such offers, even if not ideal, should be accepted if at all practical, and used as a basis for the establishment of a community committed to the Traditional Mass, which will demonstrate to the Bishop and local priests that allowing the Traditional Mass will not cause problems and divisions in the diocese.

If there is no response, and no progress, then after a year has passed it would be legitimate to go through the whole procedure again. [Oh boy!]

Polite persistence is the key to success.

————-End Quote————-

As the guidelines above mention, there is a FAQ at the link that addresses how to overcome common misconceptions and excuses used to oppose the offering of the TLM.  But unless you are incredibly blessed, you can expect to encounter a great deal of resistance.  As for going through the process over and over again, year after year, that will probably have only a low probability of success if you encounter an initial refusal, but it never hurts to try.  Since many dioceses are large, geographically, it is not reasonable to put forth that since there might be one parish offering the Traditional Mass, that is enough.  In some dioceses, traveling to that one location might require hours of travel.  But such is the attachment to this Mass, that some people do so, week after week, and sometimes more frequently than that.  Holy roller zealouts, what could they be thinking?

If you encounter resistance regarding the potential for the TLM to cause division, especially arguments that say, to the effect, that it is wrong for their to be different forms of the Mass as that might encourage an elitist or separatist attitude, there are many easy replies to make.  First of all, why is it acceptable to offer the Mass in every language under the sun rather than Latin?  Does having Mass in Spanish or Vietnamese somehow make those communities separate or elitist?  You can also counter with, if we must accord to the norm, then shouldn’t most Catholics endure lousy catechesis, use contraception, support abortion, and all the rest, since that is what most “Catholics” do today?   Another argument is that Latin is the official, universal language of the Church, it ties in with our great patrimony and offers the benefit that the TLM can be understood and participated in everywhere in the world on the same terms.  It is in fact really vernacular Mass that is novel and which tends to cause division, since instead of having one universal Mass offered in one language throughout the Church, there are now literally hundreds of different missals in different languages, with slight (or great) differences of translations and emphasis throughout all of them.  This has turned the Church into a tower of Babel, with dramatically less, not more, liturgical fluency across cultures.

There is lots more, but that’s enough for now.  Just know that by requesting a TLM you are not being a rabblerouser, elitist, or troublemaker.  You are being a faithful soul striving to improve the availability of the form of the Liturgy that has been used in the Church throughout the world for centuries, and you are doing so because you know enormous Grace will be the result.  So don’t let rejection get you down, be faithful, polite, and persistent, and most of all, pray!

Compare and contrast – the “life outcomes” of alcoholism and sodomy August 25, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, disaster, error, foolishness, General Catholic, sadness, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sexual depravity, sickness, Society.
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I have long maintained on this blog that there are powerful, I would say almost irrefutable, similarities between drug addiction and the favored sin du jour, the sins of sodom and gomomrrah.  The more I have thought about this, the more I have tended to believe that “homosexuality” reflects a process of sexual addiction and self-worship that culminates in one desiring the “same,” instead of the “opposite.”  In some sense, it’s almost genital worship.  Strange as that may seem, you ought to read what some radical lesbian feminists and sodomite men write and say regarding their equipment.  To say it seems to be the be all and end all of their existence (speaking generally, of course) would be not much exaggeration.

It is amazing how, in our current society, certain behaviors that result in negative “life outcomes” or effects on one’s life receive great concern and medical attention as something to be combated and, hopefully, reduced, while others – with even far worse outcomes – are held up as a wonderful source of diversity and something as good and wholesome as apple pie. Such is the incredible achievement of the 25 year long sodomite propaganda campaign which has taken a tiny minority, rightfully viewed with some disdain and concern, and turned it into a dominant cultural powerhouse that is now demanding, and receiving, from the dominant majority all manner of special treatment, even at great cost to the majority itself!  But the dread life effects remain all the same, and no matter how much propagandists attempt to dress up sodomy and its allied sins as wholesome, that is simply one lie that will never become the truth.  As a post at Pertinacious Papist points out, compared to even alcoholics, sodomites have disastrously bad rates of all manner of afflictions, from premature death to risk of all manner of disease.  First, alcoholism:

  • A significantly decreased likelihood of establishing or preserving a successful marriage
  • A five- to ten-year decrease in life expectancy
  • Chronic, potentially fatal, liver disease –hepatitis
  • Inevitably fatal esophageal cancer
  • Pneumonia
  • Internal bleeding
  • Serious mental disabilities, many of which are irreversible
  • A much higher than usual incidence of suicide
  • A very low likelihood that its adverse effects can be eliminated unless the condition itself is eliminated
  • An only 30 percent likelihood of being eliminated through lengthy, often costly, and very time-consuming treatment in an otherwise unselected population of sufferers (although a very high success rate among highly motivated, carefully selected sufferers).

Now, sodomy:

  • A significantly decreased likelihood of establishing or preserving a successful marriage
  • A twenty-five to thirty-year decrease in life expectancy
  • Chronic, potentially fatal, liver disease — infectious hepatitis, which increases the risk of liver cancer
  • Frequently fatal rectal cancer
  • Multiple bowel and other infectious diseases
  • A much higher than usual incidence of suicide
  • A very low likelihood that its adverse effects can be eliminated unless the condition itself is
  • An at least 50 percent likelihood of being eliminated through lentghy, often costly, and very time-consuming treatment in an otherwise unselected group of sufferers (although a very high success rate, in some instances nearing 100 percent, for groups of highly motivated, carefully selected individuals)

What the above fails to note is that the rate of suicide for sodomites is even higher than that for alcoholics, and by a substantial amount.  In addition, there are frighteningly high rates of drug addiction among that same sex afflicted community (as any addict can tell you, crossover addictions are exceedingly common.  Even when addicts get clean, they often manifest addictive behavior in other areas of life, and it’s not uncommon for addicts to have several addictions ongoing at once).

There are, in addition, other public health risks unique to the latter population which we don’t need to talk about now, but which seem almost to have been purposefully designed to target primarily that community.

That sodomy, in particular, was a dirty practice subject to grave health risks used to be one of those things most even semi-literate people understood, but many in the culture are either too propagandized to understand this, or have been educated into imbecility and no longer accept the wisdom of the ages.

But that process may well have been part of a broader plan, as well, no?

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yWHhLfc0VLg]

 

A commentary on the situation in Ferguson, MO (not what you think) August 25, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, asshatery, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, error, foolishness, General Catholic, sadness, scandals, secularism, Society.
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I read the following commentary on the ongoing civil unrest in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, MO, on Friday.  I’ll present the text before I tell you who wrote it and provide a small amount of commentary:

As we watch the scenes from Ferguson, Missouri unfold on the nightly news, does it prompt some questions? Certainly, they are not scenes that we in the United States expect to see in 2014. But, what do we see?

Are we looking in a mirror? Are we seeing ourselves as others see us? Are we seeing ourselves as God sees us? Do we feel the pain and frustration of those protesting? Do we feel the fear and anxiety of the police officers? Or, are they like figures in an NCIS episode?

I wonder if we have become anesthetized to the authentic agony of others, whose real life pain and suffering will not be resolved by the end of the show. Have we fallen victim to the culture of indifference that inures us to the sufferings of others?

Have we lost the capacity to weep over the pain of those different from us? I hope not. I pray that we seek to be compassionate not judgmental. I pray that we stand down, not stand firm. May God bring peace, justice, understanding and mercy to all the people of Ferguson and throughout this great land and may He grant us all the wisdom to see ourselves as God sees us.

———–End Quote———–

The author was Dallas Bishop Kevin Farrell.

I really don’t want to say too much, I am interested in your reactions.  But I will say a few things.

I could bring up a number of matters of prudence, such as the seeming assumption that the audience is a group of 5 year old’s that have difficulty discerning reality from a TV show (a manifestation of clericalism?). Since I haven’t had a TV in a while, perhaps its influence is even more pernicious than I thought, and there are scads of people who think what is occurring in Ferguson is entertainment.

There is much room for commentary on both the original shooting, the crimes that led up to it, the rioting and looting of the community, the extremely militaristic response of the police, and the ongoing strife in that town.  Indeed, there have been probably thousands of pages written in response to this Ferguson matter, already.

I noted above, from a man standing in an office inherited from the Apostles, a heavy focus on emotion in place of reason.  This is very common in the world and such emphasis on emotion over reason has crept into the Church to a marked degree over the past several decades.

Taking in all of the above, I am struck by how many opportunities for catechesis by Bishop Farrell were missed in choosing to place the emphasis on emotion and non-judgmentalism.  Saint Thomas does make plain that to rebel against the state authority is a grave sin, unless the state’s tyranny be truly egregious and all other methods of recourse have been exhausted.  Even then, any rebellion against the state, which this kind of rioting represents at least in part, must have at least a reasonable chance of success in changing the government, either by overthrow or by forcing a change in behavior.  I do not think either likely in response to the rioting in Ferguson, although I do hope this militarization of the police gets reconsidered.

There seems to be a growing sentiment in this country that if a white cop shoots a black person, some injustice has occurred. But how does that sentiment line up with reason and Catholic belief?  That would have been an interesting avenue to explore.  And what of the role in the media in stoking this unrest, repeatedly referring to a fully grown, 6’5″ 300 lb 18 year old giant as a boy or teen?  Yes, technically he was, but he was a teen fully capable of doing grave harm to others.

I’m not sure what the takeaway is supposed to be.  Don’t judge, have empathy for others?  So, we should just stand by when people riot and loot?  Or feel the pain of “anxiety” of the militarized police when they conduct an erroneous no-knock raid on my house at 3 am on a bogus warrant, because some unfireable civil servant typed in the wrong address?

I’m getting excited, I could go on for quite some time, but some final questions- have we, as a Church lost the capacity for bishops to guide us in necessary moral distinctions and to give reasonably clear and vigorous responses to ongoing moral questions in the Church and world?  Or are we as a Church now in a place where the best we can possibly expect is a muddy call to “understanding” and having empathy for all, no matter how egregious their behavior? And, of course, never, never, never judge!  Of course, Christ was referring to the state of someone’s soul, and not the evil of individual or group actions, but He did say “judge not,” ergo, irrespective of the context, and contrary to 2000 years of Catholic understanding, you better not judge!

Which it’s our birthday, precious……. August 25, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, Bible, catachesis, Christendom, General Catholic, Holy suffering, persecution, silliness.
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……..and we are this many……..

1 Unto the end, for the sons of Core, to give understanding.

2 We have heard, O God, with our ears: our fathers have declared to us,

The work thou hast wrought in their days, and in the days of old.

3 Thy hand destroyed the Gentiles, and thou plantedst them: thou didst afflict the people, and cast them out.

4 For they got not the possession of the land by their own sword: neither did their own arm save them.

But thy right hand and thy arm, and the light of thy countenance: because thou wast pleased with them.

5 Thou art thyself my king and my God: who commandest the saving of Jacob.

6 Through thee we will push down our enemies with the horn: and through thy name we will despise them that rise up against us.

7 For I will not trust in my bow: neither shall my sword save me.

8 But thou hast saved us from them that afflict us: and hast put them to shame that hate us.

9 In God shall we glory all the day long: and in thy name we will give praise for ever.

10 But now thou hast cast us off, and put us to shame: and thou, O God, wilt not go out with our armies.

11 Thou hast made us turn our back to our enemies: and they that hated us, plundered for themselves.

12 Thou hast given us up like sheep to be eaten: thou hast scattered us among the nations.

13 Thou hast sold thy people for no price: and there was no reckoning in the exchange of them.

14 Thou hast made us a reproach to our neighbours, a scoff and derision to them that are round about us.

15 Thou hast made us a bye-word among the Gentiles: a shaking of the head among the people.

16 All the day long my shame is before me: and the confusion of my face hath covered me.

17 At the voice of him that reproacheth and detracteth me: at the face of the enemy and persecutor.

18 All these things have come upon us; yet we have not forgotten thee: and we have not done wickedly in they covenant.

19 And our heart hath not turned back: neither hast thou turned aside our steps from thy way.

20 For thou hast humbled us in the place of affliction: and the shadow of death hath covered us.

21 If we have forgotten the name of our God, and if we have spread forth our hands to a strange god:

22 Shall not God search out these things: for he knoweth the secrets of the heart.

*Because for thy sake we are killed all the day long: we are counted as sheep for the slaughter.

23 Arise, why sleepest thou, O Lord? arise, and cast us not off to the end.

24 Why turnest thou thy face away? and forgettest our want and our trouble?

25 For our soul is humbled down to the dust: our belly cleaveth to the earth.

26 Arise, O Lord, help us and redeem us for thy name’s sake.

Interesting that this Psalm – this year! – would be the one in number corresponding to the years of my life.  For the Church and so many faithful souls seem to face the same horrible persecutions, the same terrible sufferings as King David describes above.

More and more, we seem to be a bye-word among the Gentiles, a name spoken with reproach.  And as is said above, so many Catholics “have forgotten the name of our God, and if we have spread forth our hands to a strange god.”

Oh Lord, have mercy on Your Church!  Give us the strength to remain faithful to You in our sufferings, as this Psalm You have given us so beautifully describes.  Arise and redeem Your Church!  Convert and save all the many troubled souls therein.

For the less discerning:

L43