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Prayer of a Sinner to Our Lady of Ransom November 11, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Our Lady, Saints, sanctity, Tradition, Virtue.
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Taken from the Glories of Mary by that incredible Saint, Alphonsus Maria de Liguori:

O my Sovereign Queen and worthy Mother of my God, most Holy Mary: I, seeing myself, as I do, so despicable, and loaded with so many sins, ought not to presume to call thee Mother, or even to approach thee; yet I will not allow my miseries to deprive me of the consolation and confidence that I feel in calling thee Mother; I know well that I deserve that thou shouldst reject me; but I beseech thee to remember all that thy Son Jesus has endured for me, and then reject me if thou canst.  I am a wretched sinner, who, more than all others, have despised the infinite majesty of God; but the evil is done. To thee have I recourse; thou canst help me: my Mother, help me!  Say not that thou canst not do so; for I know that thou art all powerful, and that thou obtainest whatever thou desirest of God; and if thou sayest that thou wilt not help me, tell me at least to whom I can apply in this my so great misfortune. Either pity me, or I will say, with the devout Saint Anselm, “O, my Jesus, forgive me, or do thou pity me, my Mother Mary, by whom I can have recourse, who is more compassionate, or in whom I can have greater confidence than in thee?”  Oh, no; neither on earth, nor in Heaven, can I find anyone who has more compassion for the miserable, or who is better able to assist me, than thou canst, O Mary.  Thou, O Jesus, art my Father, and thou, Mary, art my Mother. You both love the most miserable, and go seeking them in order to save them.  I deserve hell and am the most miserable of all. But you need not seek me, nor do I presume to ask so much. I now present myself before you with a certain hope that I shall not be abandoned. Behold me at your feet; my Jesus, forgive me; my Mother Mary, help me!

———-End Quote———-

Chester_Cathedral_-_Refektorium_Ostfenster_3_St.AnselmSometimes……or often…….I feel too weak in the Faith. I know Our Lord Jesus Christ is my Savior, but I also know that he is my Judge.  And a dread Judge at that.  But with Our Lady, there is not the same st-alphonsus-2sense of judgment.  She can be turned to as our constant advocate and friend.  Not that Our Blessed Lord is not…….I don’t know, I just feel an immense closeness to Our Lady, I feel very comfortable in approaching her, while at times I feel a bit of trepidation in turning to the Second Person of the Trinity in quite the same way.  As I said, I am weak in faith, please pray for me.

Perhaps it’s sort of like the natural ordering of parents: most mothers are the warm and gentle caregivers while it falls to the fathers to be a bit more distant and disciplinarian – at least in those few families that are still intact in sense God intended.  Do you understand what I’m saying? Anyone else feel the same way?  Our Lady has made so plain so many times how she longs to be our advocate if we will only allow her.  Our Lord of course loved us so much that He willed to become man and die for us, He encourages us to approach and rest in His Sacred Heart.  It is just that in my sinfulness I feel I am unworthy of doing so, which is a sin of pride.

At any rate I do so love the Blessed Mother, as a former protestant, it is inconceivable to me that I spent most of my life both ignorant of her critical role in the plan of salvation and even besmirching her true and glorious nature.  I will never do that again, and will dedicate my efforts to extolling Our Lady to all I encounter! M

My Lady, have mercy on me! Pray for me!

Although wounded, I am in your arms blessed, happy little sheep oh mother do not let me ever turn away from you

Comments

1. Baseballmom - November 11, 2014

“Perhaps it’s sort of like the natural ordering of parents: most mothers are the warm and gentle caregivers while it falls to the fathers to be a bit more distant and disciplinarian – at least in those few families that are still intact in sense God intended. Do you understand what I’m saying? Anyone else feel the same way? ”

Absolutely correct. Maybe not distant, but definitely disciplinarian. In fact, very important NOT to be distant with daughters. Daughters learn from their dads how they should expect to be treated by men… With great respect and also with a great love for their feminine nature.

Tantumblogo - November 11, 2014

Distant probably wasn’t the right word choice. But….firmer, the judge, that kind of thing.

It’s a bit weird for me given my background to have this great devotion to Our Lady, but through her, to her Son, right?

Baseballmom - November 12, 2014

Absolutely right! And dad is the final court of appeal… Maybe that is the way to phrase it? 😉

2. TG - November 12, 2014

I know what you saying about Our Lady. I know in my own relationship with my mother, I knew that if I could get to her, she could convince my dad of what I wanted (if it wasn’t wrong for me.) That’s why I don’t understand people who are against the Blessed Mother. Jesus did his first miracle because she asked him. Thanks for the beautiful prayer.


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