jump to navigation

Cardinal Koch: Fall of Communism “not all positive” because revival of Greek Catholicism has hampered ecumenism November 18, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, Ecumenism, episcopate, error, foolishness, General Catholic, history, Holy suffering, sadness, secularism, self-serving, the return.
trackback

You have got to be kidding me.  On the surface, Koch’s statement might seem relatively innocuous (even if counter to the sensus fidei of most Catholics who understand the destruction of the Soviet Empire as a good thing), but given the history of horrible persecution, suffering, and abuse the “Uniate” and Orthodox Churches suffered under communism, it seems incredible to lament the passing of the old communist regime:

“The changes in 1989 were not advantageous for ecumenical relations,” Koch told Vatican Radio. “The Eastern Catholic churches banned by Stalin re-emerged, especially in Ukraine and Romania, and from the Orthodox came the old accusation about Uniate churches and proselytism.” [It was so much easier under the old regime, he seems to say!  “We could just dial up the Kremlin and demand a bishop show up at our Council and they would be there and say whatever we wanted!  No back-tracking, no mussing around, things are much more difficult today, it’s almost like these Orthodox and Uniate guys believe in all this Jesus stuff!  That makes ecumenism so much harder!”]

“Uniate” refers to eastern churches with Orthodox-style liturgies that recognize the pope as their spiritual leader.

Pope Francis will meet Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew in Istanbul late this month. The Orthodox spiritual head supports more cooperation with Rome, but cannot ignore the wary Russians, who make up two-thirds of the world’s 300 million Orthodox.

Koch, who spoke a week after the 25th anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s fall, and on the same day as Czechs marked the start of their democratic revolution, noted that talks on closer ties between Catholic and Orthodox theologians were suspended between 2000 and 2006 because of tensions between the two sides. [One major concern the Orthodox have – Lord knows the preponderance of fault is on their side – is on the tendency towards liberal worldliness they perceive in the Church today.  Relations improved under Benedict because they saw the Church as heading in a better, more traditional direction.  I bet the brakes are hot now.]

“There are always setbacks, but I’m convinced we can make more progress,” the Swiss-born cardinal said. [Always ill-defined…..”progress”. Oh yay]

Persecution of Christians in the Middle East has brought Catholics, Orthodox and Protestants there together, he said, but the Ukraine crisis has heightened tensions among churches.

“We’ve repeatedly heard major complaints from the Russian Orthodox,” he said. “This is unfortunate because churches are supposed to be a factor for unity and reconciliation.”

Metropolitan Hilarion, the number two man in the Moscow Patriarchate, used his guest presentation to a Vatican synod on the family last month to accuse the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church of trying to poach believers from Orthodoxy. [What a joke.  The Orthodox persecute the living crud out of the Ukrainian Catholics and Catholics of all stripes every chance they get.  They constantly proselytize Catholics while getting the government to try to prevent the Catholics from evangelizing Orthodox.  They almost behave as if they do not have the courage of their convictions, if one looks at the degree to which they rely on the state to run interference for them.]

Folks, Catholic/Orthodox relations have been incredibly complex and difficult for over 1500 years. Forgive me if I am dubious that the likes of men as Cardinal Kurt Koch or his hangers on are of a mettle to overcome this very thorny problem.  The Orthodox Churches are very screwed up, mixing in equal parts nationalism with religious fervor and, maybe even more, anti-Catholicism.  If there is one force that binds the many, constantly warring Orthodox Churches together it is their anti-Catholicism.  I used to dream about “progress” in Catholic-Orthodox relations several years ago, when my knowledge of Church history was much weaker, now I pretty much just leave it in the hands of God and pray for the conversion of individual souls.  I don’t see a reunion happening by human agency at all, it could only occur through a huge movement of Grace, a basically miraculous event.

What I do fear, and what has already occurred several times in the past, is that Greek Catholics will be thrown under the bus  and  made to suffer for some perceived or promised ecumenical “gain.”  The only gains the other side will permit are those which profit them and they would like nothing more than to see that little island of Catholicism in their Orthodox sea crushed.  So pray for the Church in Ukraine, it is under heavy pressure and will probably need our support. For one thing many of our bishops really don’t care for the Greek Catholics because they do not use the Novus Ordo and are thus suspect of having a different religious identity.

h/t reader CH

Comments

1. A Mom - November 18, 2014

I find those statements to be highly offensive and painful. By God’s grace these people were able to secretly keep the Faith alive under absolutely crushing circumstances, and this “Prince of the Church” laments it?! I will stop there because I am very upset. God rest the souls of my dear Ukrainian grandparents, who would be absolutely astonished at these words.

2. Pat Scott - November 18, 2014

Are these blabbering comments about the wonders of communism coming from Satan or a man of the Faith? Is he senile? Too bad Archbishop Fulton Sheen is not alive to put this raving loon on the right track!! Sheen condemned the evil of Communism CONSTANTLY!! And this man makes these absurd comments.. words escape me!

3. Rebecca Joan - November 19, 2014

Eastern Orthodox are very anti catholic. I was surprised to find that out. It is very sad. They distort Catholic teachings left and right too.


Sorry comments are closed for this entry

%d bloggers like this: