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Instead of bishop’s walking out on the Synod of Death, maybe we should be calling for Pope Benedict to intervene? October 19, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Basics, different religion, disaster, General Catholic, Papa, Revolution, scandals, SOD, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church.
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The problem with the Synod is not, so much, the bishops.  Or there appears to be significant resistance from the bishops.  I’ve seen some tweets and other coverage the past few days that indicate Pope Francis has lost the support of a large majority of the Synod in recent days (if he ever had it).  Sure, staging a walkout would be a huge slap in the face and a very public rebuke, but I imagine – or maybe it’s hope run wild – that the rebukes have been communicated in many other ways, including the now famous intervention of 13 cardinals.  But the only response we’ve seen from Pope Francis is a doubling down on the radical rhetoric and programs for irreformable revolution inflicted on the Church.

That’s because, ultimately, this entire revolution of the past 30 months rises and sets with one man: Pope Francis.  And because no one else in the Church, in normal circumstances, has anything like the power and influence of a pope, no matter what the bishops do, a stubborn, ideologically-motivated pope could always just do what he was going to do, anyways.  And, we really don’t know just how much support or opposition Pope Francis has for his very, very broad program of reform cum revolution among the episcopate. It appears most Synod fathers are opposed, but the Synod represents maybe 5% of the world’s bishops.  Certainly there is great division in the episcopate, but overall Francis could surely find hundreds or thousands of bishop-supporters for even the most egregious acts.

However, there is a bit of an ace card on the side of orthodoxy.  We are not living in normal circumstances in the Church.  There is another living pontiff.  Not only is he living, but by all available evidence, one must believe that he is bitterly opposed to much of the program being laid out by his successor.  And even though I know many are loathe to consider this aspect, I suspect largely to preserve their faith, there is increasing evidence that not only was Pope Benedict forced to abdicate under extreme duress, but that the election of his successor was badly compromised by illicit politicking and conniving among the modernist element in the Church (just as, very explosively, a new book claims the election of Pope Paul VI was).

Now, Pope Emeritus Benedict is probably about as constitutionally unlikely to make any kind of dramatic intervention against the revolution taking place as can be imagined.  For one, he may well be a broken man.  Secondly, even if not, he has never favored the dramatic gesture Thirdly, for all his problems as pontiff (don’t they seem rather small today!), he is very cognizant and appears to have great respect for precedent and he has a sense of propriety and respect for the office of Pope that would almost certainly keep him from announcing his views on the process to unalterably remake the Church that appears rapidly heading towards a conclusion.

But what if there were to be a great groundswell of faithful Catholic voices asking him to intervene in some manner?  What if a petition could be put together and widely advertised that garnered a million-plus signatures in the next few weeks?  What if that petition called on him not to contest the office of papacy, but to simply comment on and (one would hope) refute many of the radical notions being promoted by Pope Francis? Would not such opposition from another living Pontiff gravely compromise the modernist’s efforts?

Does anyone think this could have a remote chance of succeeding, on either level?  That is to say, could Pope Benedict be moved to make a statement or statements, and might that be sufficient to derail the ongoing “reform?”  Would such an intervention cause more division and angst than any good that might result?  As to that, I’m of a mind that desperate times make for desperate measures……I think any possible unknown bad stemming from an intervention is outweighed by the bad we see staring us in the face at present.

Having said that, I would bet my house that Pope Benedict has already been approached by more orthodox prelates a number of times and has probably refused to intervene just as often.  So maybe my idea is a pipe dream.  But to me it seems more likely to disrupt the ongoing revolution than a walkout or any other intervention I can imagine.

Obviously, our prime warfare against any ongoing revolution must be spiritual. But that does not mean we are blocked from using human means.

What say you?

Comments

1. tg - October 19, 2015

I would sign it. I keep thinking he is going to have to say something as some point. He should be willing to die for Christ and his church. There are conspiracy theories that the real Pope Benedict was killed. I’ve read the same about Sister Lucia and Pope Paul VI.

2. MFG - October 19, 2015

Great idea. We may not need him to intervene just the fact he is alive offers us a person to rally to. Next to the Holy Ghost and Our Lady, he’s the largest entity both political and spiritual that can make a difference.

While one needs to be careful to respect the Papacy and Pope Francis can we not at least say “We miss BXVI” or start using Benedict’s writings in arguments against the Synod? I would presume some deference must be made to BXVI by the prelates.

3. LaGallina - October 19, 2015

I would sign it. That would be great if he would step in. But I don’t think that is going to happen:(

It does bother me that nobody seems to remember that this revolution started a long time ago. Even in the traditional press, this synod is being treated as some crazy new phenomenon. But just the fact that we are having a “synod” in the first place, in which Church leaders are voting on what should and should not be Church teaching is a major problem in itself.

Not even Benedict XVI was overly concerned with the revolution that started at Vatican 2. Sure, he “allowed” the “extraordinary form” of the Mass, and he said some pretty harsh things about the new mass, but he never has rejected Vatican II. And Vatican II must be rejected. It must be thrown into the trash bin — period. Until that happens, the Church is going to continue to have this struggle between “conservatives” and “liberals” as if this is some kind of political situation.

Tantumblogo - October 19, 2015

I agree. Although the modernists were brilliant to construct conciliar documents that are maybe 90% orthodox and 10% very novel or worse. So if one says they reject VII they can always come back with “So you reject the bodily Resurrection, you reject the Real Presence,” etc. Obviously that is not what is meant. I prefer to say Guadium Et Spes 24 is really bad, Lumen Gentium XXX is impossible to reconcile with Mirari Vos, or whatever.

LaGallina - October 19, 2015

It really does not matter if 90% of V2 is orthodox. Everything truly Catholic at Vatican II was already stated in greater clarity in previous councils. Rejection of a one bad (pastoral, non-binding) council is not rejection of former councils.

This synod would not be happening if Vatican II hadn’t paved the way for it.

4. Biff Loblaw - October 19, 2015

The Catholic Church going into schism is sort of like an American League versus National League and since the Germans don’t want him perhaps we could draft Benedict as DH or something bigger.

5. L. Chapman - October 19, 2015

Card. Burke is frequently in Rome. Such a petition could be placed in his hands to present to Emer. Pope Benedict. It would give him spiritual support. As for our warfare being spiritual, we can’t hide behind that, God has always expected and blessed a battle that takes place in reality.
I will sign such a petition.

6. Anonymous - October 19, 2015

I like the idea of the sight of Pope Benedict bursting open the doors of the synod and marching, pensively, forward to make a profound and thoughtful pronouncement on the wisdom of the direction the Synod is taking…I’m envisioning a sort of Benedict a la Gandalf the White.

HOWEVER…I fear what I have feared since he announced his resignation: As Tantum says, we now have “another living pontiff.” What could the negative consequences of this be? Well, what are the results when Mom or Dad makes a pronouncement, and the children go to the other one for a different result?

I understand the gravity of this particular situation, and the fact that our Church seems to be coming apart at the seams, but couldn’t Benedict’s intervention possibly create just another form of disorder for the Church? For example, such a situation might provide ammunition for Sedevacantism: There are now two “popes” because there actually isn’t even one. Or, perhaps it could provide the appearance of, or even actual, power struggle between pontiffs. It might stir up talk of Pope vs. Anti-pope.

What authority, canonically, does a Pope Emeritus actually have, anyway? Looking at the slippery slope, if he does step in on this occasion, what if the faithful, then, beckon to Pope (Emeritus) Benedict to intervene on every occasion or on every topic on which we disagree with Pope Francis?

I agree that this Synod is not a good thing for the Church. BUT, is it better to create a power struggle within the Rock? The outcome of this Synod, when looking through wordly eyes, could be horrible for the Church. BUT, Jesus Christ guaranteed us that the gates of Hell would not overcome the Rock on which He built His Church. Now, the topic of the synod and the temptations from which it flows are straight from the evil one, but the proposed course of action could create a power struggle within the Papacy that would be at least partly our own doing…but, could it also be the hope of Satan to cause such a division?

How are we to know? We cannot hope to outwit the evil one with our own designs. Both the Synod and the potential for division seem to work out well for evil. Therefore, I’m inclined to not chip away at the Rock on which Christ has built His Church and to stick with the spiritual means–complete Trust in Our Lord and His own words.

7. ck - October 19, 2015

Definitely feel we will be held accountable if we don’t do all we can spiritually and physically. Draft a petition! We must now pray, hope and ask for what we feel we need from a father. Then trust that our heavenly Father is in control.

8. Janet Kilb - October 19, 2015

It is definitely worth a try thru Cardinal Burke. It certainly can’t make things worse than they already are!

9. Remnant Clergy - October 20, 2015

Pope Benedict is the pope. Francis is an anti-pope, a fake, the False Prophet. Search for Team Bergoglio From Rome for details.

10. Anonymous - October 20, 2015

Whilst I like the idea of the sight of Pope Benedict bursting open the doors of the synod and marching, pensively, forward to make a profound and thoughtful pronouncement on the wisdom of the direction the Synod is taking…I’m envisioning a sort of Benedict a la Gandalf the White.

HOWEVER…I fear what I have feared since he announced his resignation: As Tantum says, we now have “another living pontiff.” What could the negative consequences of this be? Well, what are the results when Mom or Dad makes a pronouncement, and the children go to the other one for a different result?

I understand the gravity of this particular situation, and the fact that our Church seems to be coming apart at the seams, but couldn’t Benedict’s intervention possibly create just another form of disorder for the Church? For example, such a situation might provide ammunition for Sedevacantism: There are now two “popes” because there actually isn’t even one. Or, perhaps it could provide the appearance of, or even actual, power struggle between pontiffs. It might stir up talk of Pope vs. Anti-pope.

What authority, canonically, does a Pope Emeritus actually have, anyway? Looking at the slippery slope, if he does step in on this occasion, what if the faithful, then, beckon to Pope (Emeritus) Benedict to intervene on every occasion or on every topic on which we disagree with Pope Francis?

I agree that this Synod is not a good thing for the Church. BUT, is it better to create a power struggle within the Rock? The outcome of this Synod, when looking through wordly eyes, could be horrible for the Church. BUT, Jesus Christ guaranteed us that the gates of Hell would not overcome the Rock on which He built His Church. Now, the topic of the synod and the temptations from which it flows are straight from the evil one, but the proposed course of action could create a power struggle within the Papacy that would be at least partly our own doing…but, could it also be the hope of Satan to cause such a division?

How are we to know? We cannot hope to outwit the evil one with our own designs. Both the Synod and the potential for division seem to work out well for evil. Therefore, I’m inclined to not chip away at the Rock on which Christ has built His Church and to stick with the spiritual means–complete Trust in Our Lord and His own words.

LaGallina - October 20, 2015

And, Anonymous, you are part of the problem. “Don’t rock the boat. Don’t criticize the pope — even if he is declaring massive heresy on a daily basis.” How do you think we got where we are today? By all the lay people, priests, bishops, and cardinals who didn’t want to disrupt the “unity” after Vatican II so chose to remain silent who have made this mess even worse.

“For example, such a situation might provide ammunition for Sedevacantism” you say. Umm, I hate to say it, but the sedevacantists are probably gloating right about now.

11. Estella Careaga LeBlanc - October 20, 2015

I would sign it. I believe the Holy Spirit has this but we are expected to do our part, physically, to defend the Church Christ founded. We must remember the modernists have been working behind the scenes for 100 years and are now finally out in the open. Things are coming to a head. It is definitely worth a shot.

12. Guest - October 20, 2015

I don’t know, I’d rather call fire down on these murderers and rapists running the synod. They don’t destroy the body but rather the soul and these b-s are raping the Church. Even if we’re all going to die horrible deaths in the fire at least the Church and the world will be free of these perverts.


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