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As Jesus humbled Himself in becoming man, so we must humble ourselves December 15, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Liturgical Year, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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From Dom Prosper Gueranger’s The Liturgical Year (Vol. ii), a brief but, to me, powerful exegesis on the seemingly contradictory nature of the Christian life: in order to be exalted, we must humble ourselves, just as Our Blessed Lord did:

During Christmas, our meditation should turn principally upon the Birth of Jesus Christ in our souls.  At this period of the Liturgical Year, we must return to the very basis of our spiritual life, and  yield, with childlike docility, to the inspirations of the Holy Ghost.

The object of our contemplation, as well as the source of our confidence, is Jesus, the Incarnate Word, swathed in the bands of infancy, laid in His crib, presented in the Temple, and fleeing into Egypt.  His love for us has induced Him to subject Himself to these weaknesses of childhood, in order that even we may imitate our God!  St. Luke tells us that His Blessed Mother kept all these mysteries in her heart, and pondered them (Lk i:19,51).

Let us follow her sweet example, and feed our souls with the heavenly manna.  Let the rays of this hidden but penetrating Light illumine us.  If we would follow Jesus to Thabor, let us begin to follow Him in the way He now shows us – of a child’s simplicity and humility.  The higher the architect wishes to carry up the building, the deeper does he sink the foundations.  Jesus humbles Himself so profoundly, because the work He has undertaken is to go up even to the highest heavens.  As His members, we must go with Him; we must bear Him company, now in His humble crib, and later on His Cross, if we would be associated with Him when the day of His triumph comes, and He is seated at the right hand of His Father.  

———–End Quote———-

Lucky you, an unusually short and to the point post from me.  But I found the imagery of the unfathomably humbling descent  of the Second Person of the Trinity in becoming man, this crude meat, for us, suffering like us, and ultimately dying the most impossibly unjust death for us very powerful.  We must mirror that descent into humility to the extent our fallen natures, and the Grace of God, permit.  Not that I am a paramour in that regard, at all.  Humility is one of my weakest virtues.

Pray for me!

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