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Atrocities against Egypt’s Christians continue to grow July 7, 2016

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, disaster, Ecumenism, General Catholic, horror, martyrdom, persecution, scandals, Society, Spiritual Warfare, the enemy, unadulterated evil.
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At least three Christians (all Copts) have been killed in Egypt in the past week and a half.  They included a priest and a nun.  The layman was beheaded.  Some are trying to say the nun was accidentally wounded, but there is some skepticism over this.  A brief roundup on the depredations against Christians in one of the more stable, “permissive” Mideastern states.  Things in places like Syria and Iraq are far, far worse:

Yesterday, July 5, a Coptic nun was shot dead in Egypt.

The police called it a “tragic accident”.  It currently not being treated as a crime. The nun was accidentally caught in a shootout between two rival clans. An stray bullet  killed the nun, says Fides ……..

……..The first reports reported an anti-Christian attack.The investigating police of Guizeh denied this, however, describing the shooting between two local Muslim clans as the reason for the “accidental” death of the nun.

……..On June 24, several Christian homes had been burned in al-Baeda in Alexandria. A Muslim mob had gathered after Friday prayers in front of the house of Christian Naim Aziz because the false rumor was spread among Muslims, that the house may be converted into a church. The Muslims shouted the slogan: “Under no circumstances will there be a church here.” To be sure, deeds followed their  words, and and they burned down the house of a Christian and a few other Christian homes for good measure. [When an area is under muslim suzerainty, generally it is impossible to get permission to build new Christian churches or even substantially improve/repair existing ones.  That’s a powerful means to help keep the Faith in check]

…..The Christians of Egypt have been experiencing a new wave of Islamic violence for months. Last Thursday a Coptic Orthodox priest was murdered on the Sinai Peninsula belonging to Egypt. The priest Raphael Moussa was 46 years old. After the Holy Mass, which he celebrated in the Mar Girgis Church of the city of El-Arish in the north of the peninsula, he was killed in the parking lot in front of the church by a targeted shot. The murder was claimed by the terrorist militia Islamic State (IS).

A separate post from Eponymous Flower deals with the beheading:

on Monday, July 4, a Coptic Christian was stabbed in Tanta (Gharbia Governorate) by Islamists and then beheaded.

The 33-year-old pharmacist and Coptic Christian, Magdy Attia, was lured with a medication order into a house and killed there. According to Egyptian media reports, the house is inhabited by Salafists.

Awful.  What is happening to the Christians of the Mideast is horrific.  I pray their sufferings may bring a great flowering of the Faith there and conversion of millions of muslims.

For the commenter who dropped by this morning and left a profanity-filled rant, buddy, I do cover the persecution of Christians in the Mideast all the time.  I have written dozens of posts on the subject over the years, as longtime readers can attest.  I can’t possibly ride everyone’s hobby horse every day, and, yes, local events tend to get more play than international ones.  I understand your outrage and anger but I ain’t the one to direct it at.  I’ve been a strong supporter of Mideast Christians and your comments were as unjust as they were unhinged.

Any further such comments will result in permanent banning, even granting some leeway for English not being your first language.

Koptische-Christen-leiden-unter-islamischer-Gewalt-678x381

I love Eastern Christian art.  It is so ancient, so warm.  There are incredible treasures of Christian art and architecture in Egypt.  I pray they are permitted to survive.  EG28-8-14JT

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The fact that the Church leadership continues to very often ignore or explain away muslim atrocities against Christians in pursuit of (I guess) the great one world religion project is one of the most galling aspects of being a Catholic today.

Comments

1. Camper - July 7, 2016

Remember that the Copts are monophysites, and therefore more obviously heretical than PF, which is saying something. It is good not to call heretics Christians.

Tantumblogo - July 7, 2016

I’m well aware of Coptic belief, and its erroneous. But it’s also completely non sequitur to the post. The point is, muslims view Coptics as Christians, and persecute them on that basis. That’s really all that matters in this context.

The Copts and all the schismatic/heretical ancient belief groups have always been considered by the Church to be Christians and proper Churches with valid Sacraments, etc. Even though erroneous on key points and schismatic in nature, they are far superior to, say, protestants which are so far gone they don’t even constitute real churches.

I would hope we could have a little sympathy and pity for those who are undergoing such hellish persecution. Their fate may be our own before too long.

Camper - July 10, 2016

I believe that the modern custom of referring to heretics and schismatics as Christians is just that – a modern custom. Back when the Church practiced its ancient rigor, such things would not have been said. Yes, of course the slaughter of the Copts is horrendous, but it is critical to make such distinctions. Also, we should consider that many Egyptian copts might not understand what it takes to maintain freedom – rejecting the welfare state and other such things.

2. huxleyorwell - July 7, 2016

At risk of getting banned, I wish to apologize for the unfair comments and the basic desire to verbally slap you around.

By the way, this “buddy” is a very angry woman who is tired of seeing everything in the world fall apart, the way things are going.

The first part of your blog about the murders in Egypt showed that you cared.

Tantumblogo - July 7, 2016

You don’t get banned for what you said, but how you said it. No one needs to use that kind of profanity to make a point, least of all a woman. It undermines whatever you had to say, and your grammar deteriorated so badly that I literally thought you were an aggrieved mideasterner by the end. Settle down.

If you had a slight interest in the truth of what I’ve written in nearly 7000 posts, there is a search bar that would reveal many posts on the topic of mideast persecution. A really quick search just revealed 28 posts over the past 2 years alone. That’s twice a month. Yes I haven’t blogged on it much lately but it’s a topic I’ve covered over and over again.

huxleyorwell - July 7, 2016

My fault for not reading all your blogs.

By the way, I don’t hail from the Middle East, but instead from the MidWEST.

Sorry if you thought ill of Middle Eastern Christians on account of what I had said.

(By the way, there were only two typos “fir” for “”for” and “yer” for “your”. The “fir” was a pure typo, and the “yer” was done on purpose.)

The true nature of my error was not grammar –iy was the use of ugly vocabulary. We both know the nature of that error was harsh words.

Sorry if I had made Middle Easterns look bad, as that they don’t need such a burden.

Tantumblogo - July 7, 2016

I have a bad habit of reading comments too fast, so at times I also misinterpret. Thank you for reminding me that I had neglected an important subject for too long.

huxleyorwell - July 7, 2016

You’re welcome, “de nada”, think nothing of it.

I normally don’t ask people to pray for me, not since about 2014, but can you pray that I can respond to anger and frustration with kindness first? I think that kindness has become rare in me.

I made that ugly post quite ugly, probably because I wanted others to feel anger similar to my anger. I was being unkind to begin with.

Also, I need to do something as a penitential act for the over-the-top slurs that I had admittedly made. No priest should ever be despised for his ethnicity or mother tongue.

Don’t be very hard on yourself. I was being unkind in the first place.

Tantumblogo - July 7, 2016

AND, I wouldn’t expect anyone to have read ALL my posts, but perhaps before letting go with a full broadside maybe check to see if I’ve just been in a lull on a topic for a while instead of ignoring it completely.

3. Faith of Our Fathers - July 7, 2016

Sir its really nothing as far as Moslems are concerned who they kill as long as it’s Christians .What you wrote about Protesetants are true,if they fall out with their Minister they just go and start another Church. I can remember having a discussion with an Episcapallion when she said ” o but I don’t believe in God,it just gives me somewhere to go on a Sunday ” Enough said Take Care God Bless.

4. Sarah - July 7, 2016

And why is Catholic Charities working with the Federal Government to bring in Muslims from Africa and the Middle East and not these Christians in Egypt? What’s the USCCB’s explanation? No more donations to Catholic Charities. I’ll donate to Aid the Church instead.
Where is this all leading to….

5. Joseph D'Hippolito - July 8, 2016

“Atrocities against Egypt’s Christians continue to grow…

…and Pope Fuggeddabowddit continues to say nothing. Neither do the boot-licking careerists in the hierarchy, all of whom value their cherished “ecumenical dialogue” more than human life.

Then again, this was true with John Paul II and his hierarchs, as well.

Not for nothing is the floor of Hell paved with the skulls of bishops, including the bishops of Rome.

Tancred (@sedgladium) - July 9, 2016

Pope Francis has mentioned it one a number of occasions, but not enough in my opinion. It has been remarked upon that there is a reason he’s reluctant to dwell on the persecution of Catholics and Orthodox Christians in the Middle East. I suspect that he’s reluctant to upset a policy toward these people, unfortunately established long before and followed by his predecessors, in the Second Vatican Council in Nostrae Aetate:

“Over the centuries many quarrels and dissensions have arisen between Christians and Muslims. The sacred Council now pleads with all to forget the past, and urges that a sincere effort be made to achieve mutual understanding; for the benefit of all men, let them together preserve and promote peace, liberty, social justice and moral values.”

“Therefore, the Church reproves, as foreign to the mind of Christ, any discrimination against people or any harassment of them on the basis of their race, color, condition in life or religion. Accordingly, following the footsteps of the holy Apostles Peter and Paul, the sacred Council earnestly begs the Christian faithful to ‘conduct themselves well among the Gentiles’ (1P 2:12) and if possible, as far as depends on them, to be at peace with all men (cf. Rm 12:18), and in that way to be true sons of the Father who is in heaven (cf. Mt 5:45).”

Perhaps the Vatican has tried to put the quarrels and dissensions behind them, but the pleading seems to have been met largely with fire and sword, as is traditionally been our experience of Muslims throughout the centuries as they’ve raped and conquered large portions of the world.

Joseph D'Hippolito - July 9, 2016

Who cares what Francis or any Pope — or, for that matter, any bishop or anybody at all — says? Bureaucrats and executives specialize in pro forma statements that do nothing but “show” that those in charge “care.”

I would like somebody in the Catholic Church to demand stridently and strenuously that Muslim religious leaders fight this plague in their midst. I would like somebody in the Catholic Church to call out Islam for what it is: religious Nazism. I would like the Vatican to use its billions in wealth and its extensive diplomatic contacts to help these people instead of letting them be butchered.

I would like to see the Vatican end all ecumenical dialogue with Islam, at least as a protest.

But that won’t happen because the Catholic Church centuries ago — before the Enlightenment, the Reformation or the Great Schism — sacrificed its spiritual patrimony on the altar of power, wealth, political influence, secular prestige, intellectual fashion and institutional arrogance and isolation. What the Catholic Church will reap as a result will be too horrific to describe.

Camper - July 10, 2016

Excuse me, but are you a Catholic? Bad men have entered the priesthood since time immemorial, but constantly pointing that out, without mentioning the multitude of good and serious priests, is unfair and perhaps is a hint that you are not orthodox.

Joseph D'Hippolito - July 11, 2016

Oh, come off it, already! This isn’t about good priests doing their job. This is about their superiors failing to do theirs. It’s not a matter of being “orthodox” or “heterodox.” It’s a matter of being historically honest and morally clear. Do some research on St. Peter Damian and “Liber Gomorrahianus,” then get back to me, OK?

Camper - July 10, 2016

By the way, it’s fair to say that also since time immemorial, since celibacy has been required of clerics since the 12th century, that the overwhelming majority of men have entered seminaries with honorable intentions.

Joseph D'Hippolito - July 11, 2016

So what? This isn’t about celibacy but about the Church willingly turning a blind eye to murder!

And if “the overwhelming majority of men have entered seminaries with honorable intentions,” one can also say that the Church bureaucrats have corrupted those intentions. Just read Michael Rose and “Good-Bye, Good Men.”

6. Brian E. Breslin - July 8, 2016

Tantum, I am so so sorry for the horror you Dallas-area people are going through. Our son is a policeman in a big city and we know on a daily basis the worries and fears surrounding that careers.

Tantumblogo - July 8, 2016

Please pray for my friend MB. He is a Dallas PD detective and was on duty last night. He is uninjured, but he had a very bad night, as you can imagine.

7. Brian E. Breslin - July 8, 2016

Will do, I promise.

8. Are Orthodox, Copts, and Similar Killed for the faith Christians? | A Blog for Dallas Area Catholics - July 14, 2016

[…] weeks ago, I did a post on the persecution of Coptic Christians in Egypt.  A commenter objected that those holding heretical views or in schismatic groups are not […]


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