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The Profound Hypocrisy of Business Elites Masquerading Business Decisions as Moral Outrage September 28, 2016

Posted by Tantumblogo in asshatery, disaster, error, General Catholic, It's all about the $$$, persecution, rank stupidity, Revolution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sexual depravity, sickness, Society, unbelievable BS.
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Some great commentary from Franklin Graham, scion of the well-known evangelical family, on the blatant hypocrisy of the NCAA, ACC, and other business organizations punishing North Carolina for forbidding sick and/or perverse men from using women’s restrooms in public, while doing business with organizations with far more problematic, even immoral ties (via Pertinacious Papist with my comments):

As a lifelong resident of North Carolina and current CEO and president of two organizations employing nearly 1,500 North Carolinians, I am saddened — even outraged — by the vote of the ACC Council of Presidents to move conference championships from our state in protest of legislation requiring people to use public bathrooms that correspond with their birth gender.

While I recognize this legislation — and legislation like it in other states — is complicated by society’s continued blurring of the lines of gender and sexual identity, I also recognize the profound hypocrisy of the ACC, the NCAA and other companies and organizations who are making calculated business decisions disguised as moral outrage. [Great point. Do tell more]

For example, the football championship game your conference voted to move from Charlotte in December is called the “Dr. Pepper ACC Football Championship.” Dr. Pepper and its parent company, Cadbury Schweppes and Carlyle Group, proundly sell their products in countries where homosexuality is illegal. Will ACC drop its title sponsor? And why isn’t the LGBT community demanding you sever ties with such a “bigoted” corporate sponsor?  [Of course they won’t.  Because moving the championship game costs the ACC or NCAA nothing, while it hurts North Carolina a bit.  But severing ties with all corporations that conduct business in lands with violent, repressive governments would have  HUGE cost, so that, of course, goes out the window.  This is the very definition of hypocrisy, and is also how the left-dominated elite works on a daily basis.  Targeted outrage, targeted punishment, all directed towards a political goal, a goal that yields a tangible economic benefit. Support the leftist power structure, get amazing $$$$, oppose it, and get crushed]

Currently, LGBT relationships are illegal in more than 70 countries — including 10 where homosexuality is punishable by death. Dr. Pepper is often bottled under contract by Coca-Cola bottlers — yet Coca-Cola conducts business in virtually every nation on earth, including nearly every country where homosexuality is currently criminalized. Can your conference continue to tolerate that?

The ACC website proudly features Toyota as an “Official Corporate Champion,” yet Toyota maintains factories and distribution centers in several of these discriminatory countries, including Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Egypt. Where is the moral outrage of the presidents of Boston College, Clemson, Duke, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Louisville, Miami, UNC, North Carolina State, Notre Dame, Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Virginia, Virginia Tech and Wake Forest?[Once again, this inconvenient fact reveals the monetary scheming at the heart of this duplicitous “stand” against North Carolina’s bathroom law]

Indeed, the ACC’s member schools compete in 25 sports divided by gender — 12 men’s sports and 13 women’s. Though gender issues may be becoming more complicated in higher education and other parts of society, the athletic conference you serve as commissioner doesn’t seem to have any problem distinguishing between the two genders — male and female. Yet, when a state like the one I live in seeks to make the same distinction with regard to use of public bathrooms in an effort to protect its citizens from those who would use the men’s room today and th women’s room tomorrow, the academic elites who comprise your conference fake a moral outrage that is frankly shameful.

Ironically, the NCAA is more discriminatory towards transgender people than the public policy they apparently wish to see as law in America. For example, opponents to legislation like NC House Bill 2 support permitting people to use the bathroom which corresponds to the sex they identify with on a given day — meaning someone might feel like a man today and a woman tomorrow, switching bathrooms at will.

Yet even the NCAA doesn’t allow such casual gender identity for participation in collegiate athletics. The NCAA Policy on Transgender Student-Athlete Participation states, “Any transgender student-athlete who is not taking hormone treatment related to gender transition may participate in sex-separated sports activities in accordance with his or her assigned birth gender.” [Lying money-grubbing self-serving Christian-persecuting blankety blank…….]

I think I represent the views of millions who would rather preserve gender-specific public bathrooms — a mainstay for generations — than to attend a football game in my state to determine the champion of a conference governed by politically-correct, morally hypocritical academics.

Commissioner, in your statement today you said, “the ACC Council of Presidents made it clear that the core values of this league are of the utmost importance, and the opposition to any form of discrimination is paramount. Today’s decision is one of principle.” Will this same paramount “opposition to any form of discriminatin” have you now sever ties with Toyota and Dr. Pepper?

Again, we know the answer to that.  Cutting ties with Dr. Pepper would not only deny the conference a shoot-pot full of money, it could cause a lot of other corporate sponsors to bail out and really hurt their bottom line. And they can’t have that.  It’s entirely a moral outrage of convenience. No cost to the ACC, Google, NCAA, Facebook, and all the others virtue-signalling saps out there who only care about today and tomorrow’s profit, and care nothing for the destruction of the moral order in this nation or the souls whose lives – and prospects of salvation! – will be ruined in the process.

If these self-serving business interests had a moral bone in their bodies, they would immediately stand in staunch and total opposition to abortion and contraception, but I’ll be King of Mars before that happens.

But, of course, the self-anointed elites don’t believe Heaven, hell, or any of that kind of crap anymore.

crap

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Sign the Declaration of Fidelity to the Church’s Unchangeable Teaching on Marriage September 28, 2016

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, disconcerting, episcopate, Francis, General Catholic, Grace, manhood, priests, sadness, sanctity, scandals, the struggle for the Church, true leadership, Virtue.
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I’m not sure I like the word “teaching.”  Teachings are changeable, a bit amorphous.  Doctrines are better, Dogmas are the best.  Dogmas cannot change.  They are fixed.  The Church’s belief regarding marriage most certainly rises to the level of a Dogma.

That quibble aside, we’ve had  1500 odd priests in the US and Britain sign a pledge to uphold Church Dogma on marriage and urge Francis to do the same, we’ve had 42 leading prelates and theologians privately dissect Amoris Laetitia and implore Francis to return to the perennial Dogma, we’ve had cries of the heart from The Remnant and many other organizations and individuals, and now this: an attempt by even more leading Churchmen, theologians, apologists, clergy, and faithful to declare their fealty to this unchangeable Doctrine, and imploring Francis to stop undermining the constant belief and practice of the Faith.

Some 80 leading lights in the Church today signed onto this petition at its launch.  2200 other souls have done so in the past few days.  I have done so.  Perhaps you will, too.  An overview of the effort via Rorate:

80 Catholic personalities reaffirm their loyalty to the Magisterium of the Church on the family and Catholic morals
A Declaration of Fidelity to the Church’s Unchangeable Teaching on Marriage and to Her Uninterrupted Discipline was disclosed today by a group of 78 Catholic personalities, including cardinals, bishops, priests, eminent scholars, leaders of pro-family and pro-life organizations and influential figures of civil society.
The statement was disclosed by the association Supplica Filiale [Filial Appeal], the same organization that collected, between the two Synods on the family, nearly 900,000 signatures of Catholic faithful (including 211 prelates) in support of a petition asking Pope Francis a word of clarification to dissipate the confusion disseminated in the Church on key issues of natural and Christian morality since the consistory of February 2014.
Noting that the confusion has only grown in the faithful after the two Synods on the family and the subsequent publication of the Apostolic Exhortation Amoris Laetitia (with its more or less official adjacent interpretations), the signatories of the Declaration of Fidelity feel the urgent moral duty to reaffirm the immemorial teaching of the Catholic magisterium on marriage and family and the pastoral discipline practiced for centuries with regard to these basic institutions of a Christian civilization. This grave duty, according to the signatories, becomes even more urgent in view of the growing attack that secularist forces are unleashing against marriage and the family; an attack that does not seem to find any more the accustomed barrier in Catholic doctrine and practice, at least in the way they are now generally presented to public opinion.
Solidly supported by a crystalline and indisputable teaching, confirmed by the Church in recent years, the Declaration is concatenated around 27 statements upholding those truths explicitly or implicitly denied or rendered ambiguous in the present ecclesial language. According to the signatories, what is at stake are unchangeable doctrines and practices concerning, for example, faith in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist, the respect due to this Sacrament, the impossibility of receiving Communion in a state of mortal sin, the conditions of true repentance that enable to receive sacramental absolution, the observance of the Sixth Commandment of the Law of God, the most serious obligation not to give public scandal and not lead the people of God to sin or to relativize good and evil; the objective limits of consciousness when taking personal decisions, etc.

The Declaration of Fidelity is already available in English and Italian and it will soon be available also in French, German, Spanish and Portuguese. Whoever wants to adhere to it can do so by signing at the address http://www.filialappeal.org/ 

When you go to the link, click on the “XXXX signatures worldwide” to add your own name.  There, you can also read either a summary of the declaration, or the lengthy text itself.

Thus we now know with certainty of at least five public and who knows how many private intervention attempts that have been made to change the direction of this most radical and destructive pontificate and affirm the Sacred Deposit of Faith.  That these efforts have all been directed at the pope himself is, to put it mildly, unprecedented in the history of the Church.

The Church is being “fundamentally transformed” just as the US was.

PS – I finally get into Rorate!  Wish I had known Adfero was going to be there, I should have liked to have met him:

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I’m gonna make it after all, dun dun dun duuun da!!

Actually, Rorate has linked to my stuff a few times, for which I am appreciative.  The Rorate post seems to express the view that the parish is small in size but crowded.  Perhaps by New York standards.  I haven’t been in many traditional parishes substantially larger (though primarly NO parishes that offer the TLM often are).  They did note the crowds, which is always the case especially on Sunday.

My Sunday pal Hugh Sheridan wasn’t to my left as he was for almost every Sunday for 5 years or so straight.  RIP.

I think we need a bigger altar with a massive reredo with many niches for Saints statues and/or paintings.  What do you think?

A New Cristiada Brewing in Mexico? September 28, 2016

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, disaster, error, General Catholic, horror, persecution, priests, secularism, shocking, Society, unadulterated evil.
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I was stunned to read in the article excerpted below, that 31 priests have been murdered in Mexico in the past 10 years.  The killings have most often been associated with the drug cartels, which are also, not coincidentally, tightly associated with the same Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) that instigated the original Cristiada under communist President Plutarco Elias Calles in the 1920s.  Tensions have risen markedly between the PRI and the Church in recent years, as the PRI has legalized abortion in Mexico City and is atttempting to impose pseudo-sodo-marriage on a quite strongly opposed Mexican populace.

Three priests were murdered in Veracruz this past week, and the PRI-run government there engaged in a smear campaign against the priests, strongly implying they had been engaged in something nefarious and earned their demise.  The people would have none of this, as these priests were too well known as good and pious men, relatively speaking, for such an accusation stick.  Of course, in the original Cristiada, the PRI-run government accused priests and religious of all manner of immoral acts and perversions, engaging in the time-honored left-wing practice of psychological projection.  Amazing to see how little has changed in almost 100 years:

Mexico’s Roman Catholic Church on Monday harshly criticized what it called a campaign to smear three priests murdered in less than a week by suggesting the victims had been involved in questionable behavior.

The outrage came in response to a state prosecutor’s allegations that two of the dead clerics had been drinking with their killers beforehand and media reports suggesting the third had last been seen with a young boy. [This kind of guilt-by-insinuation has been a hallmark of the PRI since its inception in the dark days of 1917.  Of course, the PRI was taught much of its tradecraft by the more radical elements of the Lodge in the US]

“In these cases it has become clear that state governments that cannot handle the drug cartels are criminalizing the victims, depicting some as drunks and another as a pedophile, making it look like the crimes were not related to drug cartels but because of some immoral conduct,” said the Rev. Hugo Valdemar Romero, spokesman for the Catholic Archdiocese of Mexico City.

“To physical death they are adding moral assassination, slandering the priests and holding them up to ridicule,” Romero said, “and that has caused deep indignation in the church,” Romero said.

Two of the slain priests were shot to death in Veracruz state last week and their bodies dumped on a roadside. On Sunday officials confirmed that the other priest had been shot to death in Michoacan state after being abducted……..

………Parishioners in the Veracruz city where the two priests were killed have also said they were skeptical of the prosecutor’s account and suspected an attempt to quickly shelve the case.

Romero said of the government, “the least we expect is a public apology.” [Since I first read this article on Saturday, and when I accessed it today, it appears to have changed.  It formerly included a statement from the prosecutor’s office largely retracting the nasty implications first made against the priests.  That text appears to be missing from the article now]

It is unclear whether drug gangs were directly involved in last week’s killings, though most attacks on priests in Mexico in recent years have occurred in areas plagued by cartel violence. [And most areas plagued by cartel violence are led by the PRI, where government officials willingly accept heavy bribes to use the power of the state to help enforce the will of the cartel]

Prosecutors have suggested the robbery of a couple hundred dollars in church collections may have been a motive in the Veracruz killings.

But Cardinal Francisco Robles Ortega [of Guadalajara, one of the best Mexican prelates] of the western state of Jalisco said priests there have been subjected to extortion demands, a common practice among drug cartels in Mexico.

Mexico’s Catholic Media Center says 28 priests have been killed in Mexico since 2006, not counting last week’s slayings. It says Veracruz, Guerrero and Mexico states are the most dangerous for priests; along with Michoacan, they are some of the state with the worst drug-cartel problems.

The original article also spoke of the growing conflict between Church and state over such matters as pseudo-sodo-marriage, but that apparently was also judged inconvenient and so was flushed down the memory hole, too.

This is the danger of electronic media, it is subject to endless revision at the behest of political, economic, and cultural elites, becoming little more than a tool for propaganda, or at least the suppression of embarrassing evidence.

Buy as many books as you can.  But, of course:

Evangelization as It Used to Be September 28, 2016

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Ecumenism, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, manhood, priests, sanctity, Society, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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From the book A Saint Among Us on Servant of God Fr. Emil Kapaun, a little blast from the Catholic past:

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Seminarian Kapaun spent many evenings reaching out to souls in this novel bit of outreach and apologetics back in the late 1930s.  I think this is a brilliant idea, though it might go over as well today as it did then, given the increasing hostility towards any form of Christianity held by growing numbers of souls.

I think this form of evangelizing is superior to most of today’s technology-enabled efforts by priests to do similar work for the following reasons:

  • It is much easier to blow off a blog post or Youtube video than someone standing in your presence
  • Interaction and argumentation are much easier, and much better conducted, face to face than over the internet or even radio
  • There is no substitute for human interaction, where a soul could, hopefully, experience the warmth and charity of a devout priest, seminarian, or religious
  • This is also excellent training for a real-life apostolate, having to interact on the fly with people who may be hostile, questioning, or simply ignorant.

Downsides to this approach include:

  • It’s much more challenging to interact with doubtful or hostile souls face to face than over the internet
  • It’s demanding of priest’s/seminarian’s time
  • It may reach fewer people than a blog, social media, or other “modern” means
  • It takes a true man to stand in public and declare his faith, and all the supports for it.  Not sure how many of those are around anymore

But, for all that, I think this kind of personal interaction, necessary at the time due to lack of technology, is still superior to most of today’s attempts at the same.  I’d love to see our priests witnessing in public more than they do at present.  Of course, some of that absence here locally has been due to deliberate diocesan policy.  Perhaps that will change to a more fortuitous approach in the near future, too.

What do you think?

kapaun-painting

Excellent Analysis – How the American Republic Came to This Point of Collapse September 28, 2016

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Basics, catachesis, disaster, error, General Catholic, persecution, Revolution, sadness, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sickness, Society, suicide.
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I found a really good piece by Angelo M. Codevilla examining the background to the election in 2016 and the dire portents for the future of the American Republic.  Codevilla goes to significant lengths to prove the nightmarish, evil influence the self-anointed elites have had on this country, and how their self-serving beliefs portend only widening hatred of Christians, increasing persecution, and growing national malaise followed by ultimate collapse.

Codevilla quite rightly notes that the rise of Donald Trump is much more an expression of exasperation by a broad swath of the populace with the ruling elite who have all but destroyed this nation than it is an indication of a clearly defined set of policies.  Certainly, there are aspects of Trump’s popularity that have to do with policy – his claims to reduce or eliminate muslim immigration, build a wall to contain illegal immigration from south of the border, and his erstwhile support for some kind of return to an actual rule of law in this country – but most of all, he is supported for being perceived as an outsider, even an enemy, to the ruling class that has insulted and persecuted millions of Americans for decades, and which millions see as driving this nation off a cliff.

But Codevilla notes a danger here, on two fronts: one, even Trump, and many of his most fervent supporters, seem enamored of the same kind of rule by decree, punish your enemies philosophy that has been the primary tool of the leftist elite in this country for decades.  Secondly, Trump may well fail to “Make America Great Again,” leaving tens of millions even more aggrieved, more antagonized, more disenchanted with the political process in this country, and potentially open to revolution, or really, what might be a violent counter-revolution against the slow-moving revolution of the Left we have endured these past 50 years or so.

Thus, the prospects that Trump will return the US to some kind of pre-revolutionary Constitutional footing, the America That Was, seem slight, at best.  Having spoken with a number of ardent Trump supporters, however, many seem cognizant of this “long shot” aspect to Trump’s candidacy, but given the choices in 2016, many were willing to role the dice on a perceived outsider, hoping against hope that he might somehow find a formula to roll back the entrenched attitudes of the leftist elite, or even, even more miraculously, somehow displace that elite with a new elite, much more in line with traditional American values and support for the Constitution.

And there are glimmers of hope for this.  Trump has displayed an uncanny ability to both survive virtually unscathed the usual left-wing attacks that leave other politicians gravely wounded (or at least severely cowed), and to squash the fatal conceits and internal contradictions of cultural marxism.  Cultural marxism/political correctness has been the primary vehicle by which the ruling elite – which Codevilla repeatedly notes, includes both demonrats and Republicans, all sharing the same assumptions and hideous errors – has imposed its will on the American people.  It is one of the aspects of Trump’s rise I find most attractive.  But will Trump simply be a “reactionary” version of the same thing we have been enduring for decades, with rule by decree, executive action, secret handshakes, and all the other contra-Constitutional behaviors that have defined the ruling elite, only turned around and directed at those who have held sway for the best part of 56 years?

Codevilla’s work is long, but very much worth reading from beginning to end.  It’s also quite dense, and not easy to excerpt, so I’ll only provide his conclusion below.

His overall takeaway, however, is that whatever Trump is, and whatever good he might do, it is probably too late to preserve this Republic.  The toxic ideas of the marxist-inspired Left in this country have sunk in too deep, done too much damage, and influenced the thinking of far too many LIVs and other useful idiots to be checked by a single politician, even an exceptional one (which is far from certain, to my mind).  This is precisely my view, and has been for some time.  America has fallen beyond the realm of a political savior.  Politics is downstream of culture, the leftist pseudo-religion has definitively won the culture war (in terms of getting a large majority of people to accept their false precepts and diabolical doctrines), and only a religious renewal on a massive scale can possibly turn this country around.

I see little evidence of that, however.  What I fear will happen is just more of the same, but with limitless boundaries, as Codevilla notes, as this country transmogrifies into some kind of socialist pseudo-dictatorship of the oligarchy, with endless repression of Christians and traditional beliefs, generally.

Codevilla’s conclusion:

Trump’s slogan—“make America great again”—is the broadest, most unspecific, common denominator of non-ruling-class Americans’ diverse dissatisfaction with what has happened to the country. He talks about reasserting America’s identity, at least by controlling the borders; governing in America’s own interest rather than in pursuit of objectives of which the American people have not approved; stopping the export of jobs and removing barriers to business; and banishing political correctness’s insults and injuries. But all that together does not amount to making America great again. Nor does Trump begin to explain what it was that had made this country great to millions who have known only an America much diminished.

In fact, the United States of America was great because of a whole bunch of things that now are gone. Yes, the ruling class led the way in personal corruption, cheating on tests, lowering of professional standards, abandoning churches and synagogues for the Playboy Philosophy and lifestyle, disregarding law, basing economic life on gaming the administrative state, basing politics on conflicting identities, and much more. But much of the rest of the country followed. What would it take to make America great again—or indeed to make any of the changes that Trump’s voters demand? Replacing the current ruling class would be only the beginning.

Because it is difficult to imagine a Trump presidency even thinking about something so monumental as replacing an entire ruling elite, [how could such even be accomplished? Shut down all Ivy League and most other colleges, most public schools, where the indoctrination is so firmly entrenched rocing a change seems essentially impossible?] much less leading his constituency to accomplishing it, electing Trump is unlikely to result in a forceful turn away from the country’s current direction. Continuing pretty much on the current trajectory under the same class will further fuel revolutionary sentiments in the land all by itself. Inevitable disappointment with Trump is sure to add to them.

We have stepped over the threshold of a revolution. It is difficult to imagine how we might step back, and futile to speculate where it will end. Our ruling class’s malfeasance, combined with insult, brought it about. Donald Trump did not cause it and is by no means its ultimate manifestation. Regardless of who wins in 2016, this revolution’s sentiments will grow in volume and intensity, and are sure to empower politicians likely to make Americans nostalgic for Donald Trump’s moderation.

Two last things: first, I don’t take this piece as anti-Trump.  I think it realist.  I have become increasingly anyone-but-Hillary in the past 2-3 months, but I am highly skeptical that Trump will really turn things around in this country.  I am skeptical that any man, especially a politician, could do so.  We’re in the hands of God at this point.

Secondly, I am increasingly doubtful there will be some kind of revolutionary or counter-revolutionary reaction against the entrenched elites.  I mean, given the insults, persecutions, and unjust treatments we’ve already swallowed, what will we not swallow?  The elites are absolutely banking that we’re far too spoiled, comfortable, and afraid of losing what we have to do anything radical.  I see little evidence they are not right.

But should they begin to truly impoverish Americans en masse via things like carbon taxes, banning of fossil fuel production/use, implementation of hard-socialist policies a la Venezuela or Bolivia, then………maybe.  Note, however, that even in Venezuela, strident protest and violent reaction against the country-destroying socialist regime has been really quite limited, and the government is not experiencing an existential crisis just yet.