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Scorcese Flick “Silence” Looks Like Another Assault on the Faith November 30, 2016

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, damnable blasphemy, disaster, episcopate, error, foolishness, Francis, General Catholic, horror, It's all about the $$$, Revolution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sickness, Society.
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Martin Scorsese is a man capable of bringing prodigious gifts to bear, though he has used them most often toward prurient interests and the denigration, as opposed to the uplifting, of the human spirit.  Almost all of his films are charnel-houses of violence, hedonism, unbounded lusts of all kinds, and the glorification of extremely seedy characters on the silver screen.  Of course, his “Last Temptation of Christ,”rumored for years to have been at least partially financed by the Mafia, is blasphemous from beginning to end.  It’s a shame, as he has such talents as to make even the most gruesome acts strangely mesmerizing, even beautiful in a way, but he has manifestly refused to use the gifts he has been given for more virtuous purposes.

So it should come as no surprise that Scorsese would be willing to produce a new movie based on a 1966 Japanese fiction book that depicted the supposed apostasy of numerous Jesuit missionaries in 17th century Japan.  And, equally unsurprising is the fact that the film has already been lauded by many worldlings who have seen advance showings, and has tragically even been embraced by the Bishop of Rome himself.  In fact, the Vatican hosted the glitzy world premiere, and there has been effusive praise for this work from many Vatican officials already.

Now, the book on which the movie is based supposedly has a good deal of merit until it veers wildly off course at the end, showing collapse of faith and total despondency, and it is unknown how faithfully Scorsese has followed the book in his movie, but given the fact that the arch-progressive James Martin, SJ, was principle advisor, I don’t think we can expect a ringing endorsement of the virtues of faith, patience, joyfully accepted suffering, and steadfastness in this upcoming epic.  Rorate provides further details, while noting the extreme differences between this new movie, and the wonderful A Man for All Seasons, which is celebrating the 50th anniversary of its original release:

In 1966 the movie “A Man for All Seasons” was released in the U.S., the same year Japanese author Shūsaku Endō wrote the historical fiction novel “Silence.”
Last night, the Vatican hosted the world premiere of the movie version of “Silence,” which will be released next month. Shown at the Pontifical Oriental Institute, administered by the Jesuits, approximately 400 priests and others attended. Rorate’s invitation to the screening may have been lost in the mail, so we have not seen the movie.  But based on the novel, the endings for the two 1966 works could not be more opposite. One concludes with heroism and martyrdom, the other with indifference and apostasy.

The adaption of “Silence” for the big screen was done by Mr. Martin Scorsese, a former seminarian (Cathedral College minor seminary in New York) who is now a self-proclaimed “lapsed Catholic.”  One may remember his scandalous and sacrilegious 1988 movie, “The Last Temptation of Christ.” [Saw bits of it way back in the way back when I was a blase’ protestant teen, and even then I thought it contrived, sacrilegious, and deliberately conceived to offend as many Christians as possible.  I also thought it chicken-s–t, as Scorsese would never have the cajones to make a similar film about buddhism, let alone islam.]
To make “Silence,” Scorsese chose James Martin, S.J., as a consultant for the movie…….[Which almost certainly tells us all we need to know about this production]
Before last night’s Vatican screening, Scorsese and Mexican producer Gaston Pavlovich met with Pope Francis.  According to a Variety reporter in attendance:  “The private papal audience, held in the Apostolic Palace, was announced by the Vatican press office Tuesday in a clear show of support for ‘Silence,’ Scorsese’s passion project.” [“Last Temptation” was another “passion project,” which few studios were willing to release, let alone fund, due to its deliberately hateful content.  Thus, the recourse to unconventional sources of funding.  Consider which movie he made next]
Now, perhaps the ending to the movie “Silence” is completely different from the ending to the novel “Silence.”  We sure hope so. If not, the world will soon witness a $50 million renouncement of the Catholic Church by members of the Society of Jesus, as tacitly endorsed by the current (Jesuit) pope. The novel, which was absolutely terrific up until the end, has a clear message to leave with readers — the opposite of Saint Thomas More’s example to England and the world.
Apostasy should not be celebrated by the Vatican. These Jesuits are men for no seasons.

Indeed, and have been for decades.  At this point, sad though it may be, I wait for their hastening extinction while they refuse conversion and reform. Though with this pontiff, they appear committed to hastening headlong along the same road they have been on since the arch-heretics Tyrell and Loisy corrupted their ranks.

As for the movie, there is no chance I will ever see it.  The book’s ending is very provocative and the choice the “protagonist” makes will thrill worldlings, who will now have a powerful new weapon (a whole new mythology, powered by indelible images) with which to attack Christians who hold that adherence to the Doctrine of the Faith is the sine qua non of being a Christian, in spite of all suffering and persecution. Literally hundreds of glorious, edifying movies based on lives of real martyrs could have been made, but they would not stroke the world’s ego as this book does, telling the world, pretty much, what it wants to hear from “God.”

Meh.  As if we needed further confirmation that Hollywood and the Left – ooops, oxymoron – hate us, and hate Him.

Comments»

1. Brian Springer - December 1, 2016

Is the book itself problematic, though? The author is Catholic (though that might not tell much these days). So was the ending suppose to be a celebration of apostasy or is the book a work of tragedy, in which case the choice performed at the end is intended to seen by readers as a bad thing?

Either way, I’m not interested in seeing the film for the reasons you listed.

2. Baseballmom - December 1, 2016

“Hate us, hate Him.” Yep, that’s what He promised.

3. Faith of Our Fathers - December 1, 2016

As for Saint Thomas More in Henrys heart he loved him but as we know with history and the nice Saintly Luther who through the weasel Cromwell had him Martryed. It’s said in lots of circumstances though that Henry when all the lust of worldly things had gone from him was still a Catholic at heart . I would say that on his deathbed his biggest regret and fear was that he could not get a priest to hear his confession and administer The Last Rights. He would surely have in his mind Christs words ” what does it profit a man if he gains the whole World yet suffers the loss of his soul “. There and then he would have given his kingdom for a Thomas More.


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