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Sexular Pagan Millennials Summed Up in One Video December 6, 2016

Posted by Tantumblogo in asshatery, disaster, foolishness, huh?, non squitur, rank stupidity, Revolution, sickness, silliness, Society.
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Eternal neediness masquerading as virtue?  Check.

Complete lack of perspective?  Check.

Cultish obedience to political correctness?  Check.

Utter lack of self-awareness?  Check.

Inversion of selfishness with concern for others?  Check.

Conformist expression of ostensible non-conformity (see the hair)?  Check.

Via funny man Ross Patterson, a generation defined.  A girl triggered by lack of availability of McRibs:

I’m being somewhat tongue in cheek with this one.  There have always been boneheads and souls who turn minor annoyances into major crises.  And, this generation’s extreme addiction to the internet has put all their foibles on full display, which is actually part of the problem.  Put down your stupid phones for a few minutes and pick up a book or actually have a conversation with someone!

They’re just too easy a punching bag right now.  With all the insanity in what passes for the academy these days and general hysteria over the first electoral defeat they’ve ever been bothered by as adults (they’ve suffered others, but couldn’t be bothered to pay attention, which is the case with a majority of Americans these days), this generation has been covering itself with dung at an astounding rate.

I know I there are good people of this born 1980-2000 generation out there.  I’ve met some.  Some I know quite well.  But they are either a distinct minority in reality or are simply outshone by their outlandish counterparts.

And now they are already hyping the “after-millennials,” so-called “Generation Z” (have these bonehead marketing and sociologist types not considered what catchy phrase they’ll have to come up with next, since they’ve exhausted the alphabet)?  Are people really defined, substantially, by shared generational experiences, or isn’t individual upbringing, schooling, and socialization much more important?  Put another way, aren’t all these generational labels really primarily directed at, and descriptive of, middle to upper class suburban kids?  Does a kid growing up in the Atlanta projects fit much into what Madison Avenue describes as Generation Z?

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Comments

1. Baseballmom - December 7, 2016

Oh my goodness… this is unbelievable. Was this little snowflake serious? Suck it up buttercup….

2. : ) - December 7, 2016

This is sooooo great !!! I love it. If you knew a McRib fan you would understand. My father is in his seventies. He has always liked these sandwiches. The reason they come back every once in awhile is their big fan base. My father has had at least two or three lately that I know of, here in the DFW area. He also likes breakfast food, so he would have to disagree with this girl about breakfast food being a bad substitute for McRibs. Bad that there are no McRibs, yes, but good that it is breakfast food.

: ) - December 14, 2016

I literally just stumbled across the following:
“The McRib Song (McRib Blues)” by the McRib girl. Good song.

Also — “We Want McRib (Documentary FULL)”

Around seven minutes in to the documentary she gives some background (it’s up to you whether you believe it) :

“In the eighties my parents emigrated from the Philippines to the
United States soon after I was born. My mother did her best to raise me in the culture she felt alienated from. My dad worked as a mall busboy and took home leftover cinnamon buns. Later on he joined the US Army in Desert Storm to give back to the country that give us a chance at a better life. When I was four
mother was tired as a food preparer in Germany with McDonald’s. The McRib is available only as a permanent menu item in both Germany and Berlin. One of the earliest memories I have as a child is my mother giving me free McRibs from over the counter. The McRib was an affordable way for us to bond together a reminder of hardship s became a family tradition. In 2013 I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. My mother moved back to America to be with me for my surgery and never left my side through the entire hospitalization. My father could not be there because he was deployed. The surgery was successful and thankfully to this day I’m cancer-free. I was discharged in November of that year and when my mom asked me what I wanted to eat I said the McRib. It was such a comfort after living off of hospital food for weeks and a symbol of consistency in our ever chaotic and changing lives…”

P.S. My father has had a few more McRibs since my last comment.

I think the rest of you need to lighten up and find some actual problems to complain about.

3. Amillennial - December 7, 2016

The 60s gave us the anti-war hippies.
The 70s gave us the anti-nuke lefties.
The 80s gave us those like myself who could care less about such things thanks to MTV and greater access to other types of entertainment media than in generations previous. On it went until now with our Generation Y kids who desire to fight for something but manage to choose all the wrong and misguided causes.

At least those in the 60s and 70s fought for something objectively good. Makes one wonder if there is a connection between this earlier generation’s leaders and this latter one’s followers…

I weep for our future.

4. Barbara Hvilivitzky - December 7, 2016

This must be a joke.

5. Blaine - December 7, 2016

Born December 7th, 1981. I hope I’m not viewed that bad. I do have a hard time with people younger than me and here I figured I was just being curmudgeonly.

Baseballmom - December 8, 2016

Happy birthday one day late…. I’ve got an ’81 model… he’s quite to the right of me and very curmudgeonly…. it’s possible 😀

Blaine - December 10, 2016

Thanks. ’81 model I like that!


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