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Tempting Christ – Avoiding Satan’s Trap March 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Ecumenism, episcopate, error, Francis, General Catholic, horror, Revolution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sickness, Society, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church.
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In posting this video, The Remnant asks why St. Augustine called the Cross “satan’s trap?”

Strange question, isn’t it?  How could the Cross, the very vehicle of our salvation, be a “trap” for faithful souls?

Watch the video, and see if you can figure it out:

From the standpoint of this very good sermon, the “trap” was satan’s belief that he could undo this Messiah by having him killed.  Satan was unable to determine that Christ was truly God, and so erred in believing engineering the most horrific, shameful death possible would destroy all the good this Messiah was intending to accomplish.

But I think the analogy works on another level, too. How else can the Cross possibly be a trap?  We have no need but to look at the present Bishop of Rome, and, shuddering, find the reason.

The Cross also becomes a trap when people reduce the act of salvation to it, and it alone.  When protestants, and their unimaginative emulators in the Church, proclaim that one is saved, wholly and entirely, by Christ’s salvific Sacrifice, independent of one’s actions, this is a terrible error that has led countless millions of souls to their eternal doom.

Personified in the totally novel, made in America phrase (invented in the late 19th century) “once saved always saved,” this pernicious error has grown and multiplied until it has come to dominate most sects and made very deep inroads into the Church herself.  This is the opposite error of Pelagianism, which posits that it is possible to earn salvation entirely by one’s own efforts at virtue, independent of God’s Grace flowing through that one-time but constantly re-presented Sacrifice.

Salvation through a one time proclamation that Christ is one’s “personal Lord and Savior” is refuted numerous times in Scripture, most notably I Cor xv:31, Heb iii:13 and especially Mt xxv:31-46, but the supposedly “scriptural” protestants have twisted it to their own destruction, as St. Peter warned they would.

Of course, Catholics know the truth, that we are saved through Christ’s Sacrifice, yes, but also by cooperation with Grace through the good works we do and the sins we avoid.  Christ tells us repeatedly through Scripture that we establish the fact of our existence in the state of Grace through good works, and that those works are necessary for our salvation.  Christ’s Sacrifice offers us the potential for salvation, which was all but impossible before, but does not guarantee it based on a silly one time altar call.  Such an American concept, anyway, that salvation is like placing an order in a drive thru.

It is terrifying to contemplate that the man elected to the Chair of Peter so openly seems to hold protestant beliefs as much superior to the Sacred Doctrine of the Faith.  Francis has heaped praise on the sects and feted numerous sect leaders, and seems to never tire of heaping scorn and derision on faithful Catholics.  It is the inversion of the Truth and the damage being done to souls is incalculable by human means.

Our Lady, however, revealed the answer, at least figuratively, at Fatima, when she showed Lucia, Jacinta, and Francisco the souls falling into hell like snowflakes.

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Comments

1. The Lord's Blog - March 8, 2017

Reblogged this on Jean'sBistro2010's Blog.

2. Numbskull - March 9, 2017

One could argue that the reason our country is failing so miserably is exactly because of this Protestant error. Christ didn’t save us on the Cross, He redeemed us with the Father in Heaven, through His perfect sacrifice. It is still up to us to work out our salvation here on earth, by grace through faith and works.
Francis? He’s some kind of strange one world religion guy. Indifferentism.

3. dfw - March 11, 2017

“snowflakes” — Presumably she didn’t mean Millennials.


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