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How Long Before Father James Martin SJ Comes Out As An Open/Active Sodomite? July 19, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in asshatery, cultural marxism, different religion, disaster, error, General Catholic, horror, pr stunts, priests, Revolution, scandals, sickness, Society, unadulterated evil.
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Discuss.  He may as well come out, he’s done everything but put up a billboard attesting to his proclivities and, probably, unchastity.

But the Vatican’s got his back, at least the heresiarch/demoniac Fr. Tom Rosica does.  I doubt Rosica says or does much of anything without clear direction from Francis.  You do the math.

One day, and that day may not be as far off as we fear, traitors/double agents like Martin and Rosica will be pitied and reviled by all good souls and even the Church as an institution. God will bring this revolution of self-interested sexular paganism in the Church to an end.  It’s only a matter of time.

How many souls are led to eternal suffering by the lies and errors of these men, however, is too terrible to contemplate.  May God have mercy on us all.

To know why former Dallas Bishop Kevin Farrell got his red hat, consider this: he endorsed Martin’s immoral book:

Who else do we find endorsing Fr. Martin’s 2017 repackaging of the New Ways message of the 1990’s? None other than three of Pope Francis’ most recent episcopal appointments: Cardinal Joseph Tobin of Newark, New Jersey; Cardinal Kevin Farrell, Prefect of the Dicastery for Laity, Family, and Life; and Bishop Robert McElroy of San Diego, California.

Farrell is a hardcore modernist and worker of amoral revolution in the Church and against all the souls alive in the world today. Whatever he pretended to be while Benedict was still Pope to get an appointment in Dallas is long gone.  But what would we expect from a protege of McCarrick?

And I’ve been reliably informed that Farrell more or less hand-picked his successor, our current Bishop Edward Burns.  Yippee.

UPDATE: Just read this in I Corinthians ii:

9 But as it is written: *That eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither hath it entered into the heart of man, what things God hath prepared for them that love him:

10 But to us God hath revealed by his Spirit. For the Spirit searcheth all things, even the profound things of God.

11 For what man knoweth the things of a man, but the spirit of a man that is in him? So the things also that are of God no man knoweth, but the Spirit of God.

12 Now we have received not the spirit of this world, but the Spirit that is of God, that we may know the things that are given us from God:

13 *Which things also we speak, not in the learned words of human wisdom, but in the doctrine of the Spirit, comparing spiritual things with spiritual.

14 But the sensual man perceiveth not the things that are of the Spirit of God: for it is foolishness to him, and he cannot understand: because it is spiritually examined.

Martin, Rosica, the rest of their ilk, and, yes, Francis, are sensual men.  To them, the things of the Spirit, the constant belief and practice of the Church, are foolishness, because they have neither eyes to see, nor ears to hear.  They are blinded and deafened by their attachment to the “pleasures” of this world, and to its master.

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The Innovators/Modernists in the Church are Either Heresiarchs or Demoniacs July 19, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, cultural marxism, different religion, Francis, General Catholic, horror, Latin Mass, manhood, priests, Revolution, scandals, secularism, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership.
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An excellent sermon below from a priest much loved by this blog, dealing with the subject of attempted radical changes to Church belief which fallen men have tried to impose on her almost from the Church’s inception.  The specific matter addressed here has to do with a small portion of the First Catholic Epistle of St. John, but there are obvious implications for all those attempting to foist different and novel beliefs upon the Church.

The priest’s key point is that the Church has been empowered by God to be THE reliable witness to the Truth of Jesus Christ in the world for all time.  Father uses a secular analogy to describe the impact the innovators have on the Church’s credibility – if the sole eyewitness to an alleged murder radically changed his testimony on the witness stand, even contradicting himself, would such a witness be considered reliable?  Of course not.  In the even more weighty matter of giving testimony of the Truth absolutely necessary for salvation, if the Church changes her testimony, what will the result be?  The result will not be to win the appraise and lauds of the world – those these may occur, they will be fleeting, and more a self-congratulatory chorus from enemies of Christ and His Church on finally having “vanquished” an eternal foe – the result will be the total collapse of the Church’s moral and spiritual authority and its dismissal from the ranks of seriously considered belief systems.

Of course, even before Francis, immense damage along this line had already been done, as Vatican II and the revolution which afflicted the Church from the early 60s on produced numerous priests and prelates who promoted everything from practical apostasy to subtle undermining of ancient beliefs.  But it’s one thing for individual priests and prelates to promote error, it is something else for the highest authority in the Church to do so.  While Francis is never mentioned by name in the sermon, it is obvious that the specter of Francis looms large over all the priest says.

There is some good news, however.  The priest relates that during the Arian heresy, something like 95-97% of all the priests and bishops in the Church fell into the error that Christ is not God.  How many laity fell likewise is not as well known, though most historians describe the laity as being the main source of orthodoxy during this widespread heresy. Today, I’d say similar figures probably apply to the hierarchy, but in the current crisis, a vast majority of the laity has also fallen away.  I do think, in most respects, this current crisis of sexular paganism/modernism is the worst the Church has ever faced.

May God have mercy on us all.

PS – I saw on Rorate last week how one of Francis’ closest collaborators in wreckovating the doctrinal edifice of the Church, Fr. Anthony Spadaro, attacked Church Militant by name (and at length) in an official Vatican publication.  While I have no time and little interest in following Church Militant anymore, reading it did remind me of a saying an old Senior Chief Petty Officer in the US Navy used quite frequently: what would you expect from a pig, but a grunt?   I would say this attack (which was basically superficial, ill-informed, and full of spite for the United States via a wholly distorted view not only of the US but of the Church herself and her ancient conception of proper Church-state relations) is actually a good sign, in that some of the efforts at resistance (whatever we may think of their particular merits or lack thereof) to the revolutionary agenda are reaching even the highest levels of the Church.  Keep up the fight, and keep to that Faith which has always been believed and practiced.  You can learn this Faith by studying the Saints of old and reading pre-conciliar, and especially early- or pre-20th century books on morality, theology, and the like.  They are available, and a small but growing number of publishers are turning out reprints (or wholly new translations) of traditional Catholic works.

This pontificate lusts to be adulated by modernism on it’s own terms.

Saint Alphonsus Liguori on How to Perform Our Actions Well      July 19, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Holy suffering, mortification, Saints, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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In performing our actions well, the Saint means in the manner most pleasing to God.  This excerpt is from The True Spouse of Jesus Christ, a book originally intended for religious, but this section in particular has great relevance for all souls, not only those specifically consecrated to God in religious life (pp. 187-9).

Many times, we may get bogged down with the seemingly dull routine of life. We might find our job less than satisfying. We may be tempted to find as many distractions to get us through the day as possible (like, say, blogging).  We might find raising and educating kids very tiresome after 5 or 10 or even 2 years.  We might find it a lot more appealing to spend the afternoon on Facebook rather than do the laundry and check the kid’s math homework.

Even though our daily actions may not seem glamorous, even though they may eventually come to seem to be a tiresome routine, these constitute (for laity) the duties of our vocation in life and the means God has given us to grow in Grace and virtue.  We should not only perform these duties with great diligence, but we should even thank God for these means  He gives us to draw nearer to Him in this life.

Begin excerpt:

The following are the means to perform our actions well:

The first means is to preserve during the discharge of our duties a lively sense of the presence of God, that thus every act may be worthy of His divine eyes.

The second means is, to perform every work as if it were the only duty you had to fulfill. When at prayer, let your sole care be to pray well; when you say the Divine Office [which is not enjoined as precept on laity, but which is an extremely beneficial devotion], direct all your attention to the devout recitation of it; when engaged in any employment, your soul concern should be to discharge it well.  Think of nothing but the duty in which you are occupied. To examine, during the time of prayer, how you will direct a certain work, or to reflect on the mans of performing some other duty, is a temptation of the enemy.  “When,” says Saint John of Avila, “any unseasonable thought enters your mind, say: God does not will that I think at this moment on such a subject; and therefore it is not useful for me to reflect upon it: when He commands  me, I shall attend to it.”

The third means is, to perform every action as if it were the last of your life.  St. Anthony frequently recommended this means to his disciples. “In every work,” says St. Bernard, “let each one say to himself: If I were about to die, would I do this?”  Would I it in in this manner? Were this the last Mass that I should hear, with what devotion would I be present at it?………Were this my last Communion or my last meditation, with what fervor would I perform it?  When, says St. Basil, you discharge the duties of the morning, imagine that you shall not live till evening; when night approaches, think that you shall not see morning……….

Four, to think each day only on the labors of the day, is another means which greatly assists weak souls to discharge their duties with fervor.  The apprehension of the pains to be endured, in living till death with so much exactness, and in continually resisting self-love, is one of the causes which make many lose courage in the way of God.  The best means of conquering this temptation is to imagine each morning that you have but one day to live.  Whoever represents to himself that only one day of life remains, will certainly perform all the actions of that day with great perfection.  This means is very profitable for weak souls, but strong and perfect Christians do not require to conceal from themselves the labors necessary for the attainment of sanctity; they rejoice in suffering, and pant for opportunities of pleasing God.

Fifth, and finally, to those beginning to walk in the way of perfection it will be very useful to consider that what is in itself difficult and painful will by habit soon become easy and agreeableI will, says the Holy Ghost, lead thee by the paths of equity; which, when thou shalt have entered, shall not be straightened; and when thou runnest, thou shalt not meet a stumbling block (Prov iv:11-12).  I will, says the Lord, first conduct  you into the narrow paths of virtue; but you shall soon walk through a broad and pleasing way, and there you shall run without difficulties or obstacles. “At first,” says St. Bernard, writing to Pope Eugenius, “some duty will seem intolerable; if you accustom yourself to it, in process of time it will not appear so difficult; afterwards you shall not feel it; and in the end you will delight in it.” Behold with your eyes, says Ecclesiasticus, how I have labored a little, and have found much rest to myself (Eccl li:35).

———-End Quote———–

Do you find it difficult to present to yourself each day or night as your last? This is something I – I’m not sure struggle with is the right phrase – I have not developed the habit of or accustomed myself to.   It seems something very much worth trying, for both embracing some of my more prosaic duties and overcoming some attachments I have so far been unable to separate myself from.  If you have experience with these methods, please share, or if you try them, let me know how they work out.