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Kinda Neat, Kinda Flightline Friday July 26, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in catachesis, Flightline Friday, fun, history, huh?, Latin Mass, sanctity, Society.
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So I stumbled upon this the other day:

This is the patch of the 67th Cyberspace Wing, Lackland AFB, TX.  Formerly the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, which RF-4Cs used to wake me up Every. Saturday. Morning. at 7am when I lived in Austin. Flew right over my ghetto apartment.

At any rate, Lux Ex Tenebris is, of course, a phrase that emanates from the Catholic faith, most particularly, Tenebrae during Holy Week.  Lux Ex Tenebris means “Light out of Darkness,” which is the very essence of our Blessed Lord’s Passion, Death, and Resurrection.

So, on the one hand, I want to say, that’s neat.  Maybe some devout Catholic helped devise this motto?

Of course, this is not the old 67th TRW, unarmed and scared shitless unafraid, flying solo missions over hostile territory to gather photographic intelligence. No, this is the 67th Cyberspace Wing, whose mission is to “train and ready airmen to execute computer network exploitation and attack. It also executes full-spectrum Air Force network operations, training, tactics, and management.”

So maybe it does things like trying to hack into sensitive computer networks of potentially hostile great powers like Russia or China? Maybe they hack into North Korea’s missile program?

Or maybe does it ever work with the NSA in prying very deeply – to a degree that would be unbelievable to the Founders of this nation – into the personal affairs of private citizens?

Hard to tell in this day and age. And the wing is probably fortunate most people today are wholly ignorant of both Latin and the connection this phrase has to the Catholic Faith.  Otherwise, they would probably be forced to change it.

The motto dates back to the Korean War, and the unit’s activation at that time.  Maybe an early CO or DCO was a devout Catholic, and tried to sacralize the wing from its start.  Or perhaps they simply had some knowledge of Latin, though this phrase has, in the Western parlance, always had an overwhelmingly liturgical association.  Then again, the United States of 1951 was a much more Christian, much better educated nation.  If airmen from then could be magically transported to today, they would find the place unrecognizable, and be heartbroken to know that, whatever their efforts against external enemies, this nation has very nearly fallen to internal ones.

BDA from 67th TRW RF-4C, Operation Desert Storm

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Comments

1. Andrew - July 27, 2017

Great post. Lots of symbols and language from our Christian past used in the imagery and mottos of countless US military units are gone now and in its place have come ubiquitous variations of the death head, many with notably demonic features. During an Iraq deployment early in the war a battalion commander of the unit I was assigned to noticed various skulls being scrawled on unit equipment and ordered them removed saying that he wouldn’t have a symbol made famous by the SS used in this unit. His small effort to hold back the tide worked while he was in command but ultimately didn’t change anything. The “Military Religious Freedom Foundation” has had a hand in this but its mostly, as you note, cultural and intellectual decay.


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