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Fr. Martin Makes a Statement September 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, asshatery, cultural marxism, different religion, disaster, General Catholic, horror, Revolution, sadness, scandals, self-serving, sexual depravity, sickness, the struggle for the Church.
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Rorate has gotten some criticism over a tweet they did of this pic, not so much for the pic, but for what they had to say about it.  You can decide for yourself whether you think their commentary appropriate or not.

As for me, both the non-wearing of clerics, and the bottle on the shelf, make a very strong statement.

I highlighted the bottle to help you find it.

As if we didn’t know already.

He would come out, if he didn’t think it would hurt his cause.  Once Francis declares the Church for “gay unions,” he’ll be out n’ proud.

Poor soul.  He sees in Francis nothing but great victories for himself, but he is just digging deeper into a never-ending pit of sulfur and brimstone.

UPDATE: I read a chapter of the Bible every day.  This, providentially, was in the chapter I was to read today (since I go in order from beginning to end):

 I charge thee, before God and Jesus Christ, who shall judge the living and the dead, by his coming, and his kingdom:

Preach the word, be instant in season, out of season, reprove, entreat, rebuke with all patience and doctrine.

For there shall be a time when they will not endure sound doctrine, but according to their own desires they will heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears:

And will turn away indeed their hearing from the truth but will be turned to fables.

Father James Martin has turned away into fables of his own making.

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The TLM Demands More and Delivers More…… September 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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……..much, much more!

Before I begin excerpting Dr. Peter Kwasniewski’s excellent post comparing the TLM, as predominately offered today (very well and reverently), and the Novus Ordo, as predominately offered today (poorly), I will point out, as Dr. K does, that there are rare examples of the Novus Ordo, offered in Latin, that offer many of the same benefits as does the TLM (while making many of the same “demands,” as well).  I have been blessed to assist at Novus Ordos offered in Latin that feature the Asperges and with the priest facing the tabernacle, speaking lowly in Latin during the consecration and with bells and smells lifted from the TLM, and both my family and I derived great spiritual fruit from this.  You could easily say the NO in Latin was a quite beneficial and necessary step for us on the way to the TLM.

However, while I don’t wish to be accused of “typical” Trad pridefulness, I do believe that, even when offered as beautifully and reverently as possible, the Novus Ordo in Latin does not quite reach the standard of the TLM in terms of fruitfulness for souls and benefits not only for the life of the Church, but for the world at large.  There were simply too many changes.  Even the Canon was not left untouched, and most sadly, the very words of the Consecration.  Also less beneficial were the massive changes to the readings, and especially the deliberate excision of “problematic” parts of Scripture, the ones that speak of condemnation, blasphemy, even damnation, or – horror of horrors – which point to the Church as the unique body instituted by God for salvation.

But, having said that, if Francis or some other evil force were to somehow abrogate the TLM tomorrow and get all the bishops and priests to go along – if the TLM disappeared – I could probably get by without much ill effect on the best NO in Latin I ever experienced, one that even, perhaps against the “rules,” but of enormous benefit for souls, lifted a few bits of the TLM back into the NO – like the Canon and consecration (yes, that happened).  This assumes basically the situation I encountered, that of a fully orthodox priest who desperately desired to offer the TLM but was barred by diocesan regulations – though I understand he is back to offering Mass ad orientem again, now that a certain Cardinal who stopped him from doing so is out of this diocese.

At any rate, to portions of Kwasniewski’s post, about what the TLM demands, but, even more, what it delivers:

We have probably all met people who are thinking of attending the traditional Latin Mass on a regular basis and who, when they actually start going, are struck by how much extra effort it costs. Perhaps we ourselves once felt the same way.

For starters, you are expected to kneel for long stretches of time. There is a lot of silence to get used to (and, if you are a parent, to keep your children relatively quiet in). Sometimes there are lengthy readings, chants, or prayers that may test your patience and stretch to the limit your capacity for meditation. You might be confused about what words the priest or the schola is saying or singing, because the hand missal you picked up from a bookcase in the foyer is over a thousand pages long, and you haven’t figured out how to use it yet. So much is strange, even overwhelming; sometimes it seems random. And the whole of a High Mass might last for an hour and a half or even longer, depending on the solemnity of the rite or the volubility of the preacher. Everyone dresses up more; women are expected to wear veils; the atmosphere is more serious. An eager devotee might volunteer the information that Catholics who come to Mass here often try to observe either the three-hour Eucharistic fast or the fast from midnight. The usus antiquior is premised on asceticism and a reverential beauty in no hurry to be done. This Mass demands a lot of you and your family, physically, mentally, emotionally, spiritually. Is it worth the effort?

On the other hand, going to the Novus Ordo can be such a breeze………[I’ll skip the explanation.  He means, a breeze, in the sense of making few demands in terms of personal effort]

[Onto the benefits of the TLM]……First, you come to realize that even after years of attending the Novus Ordo, you had not developed much of a “liturgical interior life”—that is, the ability to rest in the mysteries shining forth in the Mass, to absorb the prayers or Scripture texts, to connect deeply with the Real Presence of the Savior. The usus antiquior makes ample room for the growth of the spiritual life at the pace and in the way most suited to each individual, offering many helps or “handles” for penetrating into the marvels of the Eucharist and of the Church’s liturgical year. It gives you a lot more to pray about and a lot more room to pray in.

After experiencing this for a while, it can be like a shower with ice-cold water to return to the Novus Ordo and discover that it is pretty much a non-stop extroverted exchange from start to finish, with now the priest speaking, now the congregation, always “something doing,” and never, or rarely ever, an expanse for resting, absorbing, connecting. Even though the classical liturgy has a lot more going on in its minutiae, it operates on broader lines at a more leisurely pace—an inheritance from the ancient Mediterranean world and the monastery-rich Middle Ages……..

………..Second, at the traditional Mass you start to notice a plethora of little things that serve as windows to the infinite and eternal: the priest kissing the altar time and again; the bowing of heads at certain phrases in the Gloria or the Credo; many signs of the cross made at significant moments; the clink of thurible chains and floating clouds of sweet smoke; the subdeacon holding the paten under the humeral veil; the pregnant silence of the Canon; the lifting of the chasuble at the elevations; the many ringings of bells; the corps of servers with straight backs and folded hands; the touching of sacred vessels and of Christ’s holy Body by ordained ministers alone…. All these little things (and the list could go on) are so many signs or calls of love from God, who is drawing us with exquisite gentleness into the depths of His mystery, preparing us for our beatitude with Him. He would never wish to give us anything less than the fullness of the orthodox Faith, in the fullness of its sacral expression.

(“Now wait a minute,” you may say; “can we not sometimes find the same little things in the Novus Ordo, too?” Yes, you might find some of them, on a good day, if you’re lucky.[1] The problem is that they rarely appear in that context, and when they do, it is with the slightly awkward feel of strangers who have arrived at a casual party vastly over-dressed. [There is something to this.  I don’t mean to insult anyone’s preferences, but even at the very best Latin NO there was a little sense that all the pomp and reverence was something of an affectation – and at the very worst it was obvious.The NO was intended to be a Mass in the vernacular, and offering it in Latin comes across, at times, a bit false.]……..

………Third, by immersing oneself in the ancient Roman liturgy, one’s identity as a Catholic, and the content of Catholicism, becomes thicker and richer. With the aid of good illustrated books, sound catechesis at home, and patient parenting, your children will have the opportunity to become more fully Catholic, too, and their unspoken sense of the reality of the Faith, the powerful reality of the things we say we believe (such as the Real Presence of Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament), will grow. This, in itself, is worth all that it takes to get to the traditional Mass: children will be confronted again and again with unequivocal signs of the holiness of God, the dignity of priests, the set-apart sacredness of the sanctuary, the altar as a place of sacrifice, and the special privilege of receiving the Lord from the anointed hands of His minister, as we kneel along the altar rail to receive the precious Body of Jesus. [This is something I do see: it’s not universal, but there is frequently a connection children make to the TLM that I’ve simply never seen in the NO of any stripe, no matter how good.  You will see little boys literally playing priest at home, asking their moms to make them little chasubles to wear.  Their brothers will help “assist” at the play mass, and sisters will be the congregation.  Children start paying better attention to Mass at a younger age, in my experience, too.]

The traditional liturgy is like the old catechism writ large, in vivid characters, imprinting fundamental truths on the souls of those who attend it—truths for which there is little obvious support in the Novus Ordo, with its democratic permeable barriers that allow laypeople and clergy to mix roles and functions, its positioning of the priest versus populum as a “presider” at a social event, its treatment of the altar as a table, its dearth of signs and symbols to catch hold of and elevate the mind, its nearly institutionalized use of substandard church music, its lack of intrinsic silence, its encouragement of informal attitudes, and much else besides.  If we want to avoid all this, we must not dither and second-guess. We must make up our minds to attend the Church’s traditional liturgy, which enshrines the totality of Catholic dogma and responds to man’s deepest religious needs. Whatever our vocation is, whatever our state in life, whatever the state of our soul, we stand to receive a treasure infinitely greater than any sacrifice we might make in order to obtain it. If we are parents with children, we are greatly increasing the possibility that God may give our families the greatest gift after the Most Holy Eucharist, namely, a vocation to priestly or religious life—a vocation that the traditional liturgy awakens in a disproportionate number of its adherents. [So true – the number of vocations from TLMs compared to Novus Ordo is exponentially higher – by percentage of souls attending who follow their vocation.]

An awakening to the interior life; the finding of dozens of new paths to the knowledge and love of God; the enrichment of one’s identity and faith as a Catholic—this is what the extra effort of attending the traditional Mass wins for you. Is it worth it? Can we say that this is a “reasonable” demand for modern people?

Maybe that is the wrong question to ask, for the truth is better than we expect or deserve. The tradition makes foolish, unreasonable demands because it aims not at our comfort but at our divinization. Its aims at passion, death, resurrection, and ascension, and efficaciously accomplishes them. We would do well to follow this narrow way that leads to abundant life.

Thanks to MFG for the link.

I know a few folks who tried the TLM once or twice and did not feel comfortable. It is an enormous change.  But it is so very much worth the effort.  And if you’ve had a bad experience, if you felt lost or not welcomed enough, please, try again.  Locally, at any rate, there are strong efforts underway to try to make newcomers feel as welcome and involved as possible.  Especially if you go to the 9am High Mass on Sunday.

For those who have never been, it is truly an experience every Catholic should have a serious exposure to – and by serious, I mean, attending at least 3 or 4 times in relatively short succession.  If you still don’t like it after that, so be it – and there are a few, I must admit, especially those of the generation that were taught that the TLM was really bad and just had to be replaced, for their own good – but you owe it to yourself to try it, even at the cost of some effort (one which Dr. K does not mention – often very long travel times, and in other dioceses, inconvenient hours).

Out of time.  2000 words anyway.  You got your fill!

Hope Amidst Horror in the Bergoglian Church September 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, different religion, episcopate, Francis, General Catholic, Holy suffering, Our Lady, persecution, Restoration, Society, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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A really excellent video analyzing the current state of the Church from Michael Matt.  He incidentally gets in some digs at that operation in Detroit that still, apparently – I haven’t watched any of their product in years, for a number of reasons – is refusing to address the 900 bazillion ton elephant in the room, while spending enormous effort/volume of fire shooting at various mice and cockaroaches.  Sure those latter must be opposed and drug into the daylight, but the house will still be destroyed so long as the elephant is free to rampage, and the damage done by the former is orders of magnitude greater than the latter.

But the main point of the video is not just to expostulate on the dire situation in the Church, a situation likely unprecedented in Her 2000 year history, but also to give hope to know that God is still in charge, that His promise to never abandon His Church and the faithful still applies, and that we must have recourse to Our Blessed Mother as our ultimate intercessor with God to have mercy on His Church and restore sanity to the Church.

Both Matt, and, I should add, Bishop Gracida note that this lay intercession is a necessary step in the path towards a formal correction issuing from a certain body of Cardinals, which, I pray, will be more than two.  Bishop Gracida believes that Cardinal Burke, the obvious leader of the cardinalatial “resistance,” should do so before the end of the year.  Even if the cardinals do nothing, either because they are unwilling or unable to do so (for instance, if no other cardinal will join Burke), the lay correction still has great value.  Francis has been corrected. He has been called out.  Future generations, once sanity has been restored to the Church, can and will make use of the historical record this correction provides – and if I were the authors of the correction, I would disseminate hard copies to every chancery and every major Catholic university in the world.  The electronic pseudo-records may not be around forever.

The key role for the laity in all of this however is two fold – to keep the Faith, and to pray.  We cannot allow ourselves to be drawn into extremes of thought or action because of the daily uber-scandals inflicted upon us.  We cannot allow our hearts to become hard and to lose Faith in the Lord.  This too shall pass.  Not perhaps in our lifetimes, but eventually.  And if not, perhaps our children or grandchildren will be witness to the glory of the Lord again on this earth in the Second Coming.  Our Lord Himself told us in inspired and inerrant Scripture that at the end of times, the Faith would be all but dead in the hearts of men.

In the interim, we must be doing all we can – more than we presently think we can – in terms of prayer and sacrifice, and in particular prayer for the intercession of Our Lady. Perhaps this October 13 will witness another unprecedented miracle, but perhaps not.  Either way, Our Lady’s intercession is our best recourse for bringing about the restoration of Holy Mother Church and, just as importantly, the conversion of so many billions of dead, hardened souls.  Even in times when the Faith was infinitely more alive in the hearts of men, at least in parts of the world (the 13th century), the Lord’s hand of judgment was stayed through the enormous piety and noble acts of a handful of great Saints, especially St. Vincent Ferrer.  The fewness of the number of the remnant matters not, what matters is their fervor of faith and cooperation with Grace.  In this respect, some of us, and I certainly include myself in this number, have not been doing all we possibly can, preferring instead to cast aspersions at the failures of others rather than take out the beam in my own eye.

You may have already seen the video, but if you have not, I strongly recommend you watch it.  It’s extremely good.  As a final aside, in the interest of time, I have developed the habit of watching videos at 1.25 or 1.5x speed, which makes a 24 minute video last 16 minutes.  Any faster and they either sound ridiculous or I can’t keep up.

Pray.  And reserve some mercy in your hearts even for those who so despise the truths of our Faith and work so hard to endanger souls – we must, as Catholics, love all, even those who wound us so deeply and spread so much obvious destruction.

Bishop Gracida: Prepare to Live like Catholics under the English Persecution September 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, different religion, episcopate, error, fightback, Francis, General Catholic, Holy suffering, Latin Mass, manhood, persecution, Revolution, Society, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I think this is a most insightful commentary, and one that I agree with.  The persecution of Catholics in Tudor/Jacobian England in the 16th and 17th centuries gives us a very clear picture of what it is like to suffer through a Church  that allows itself to be whored out to the opinions, desires, and whims of the powers that be.  This is precisely what many feel has happened to our beautiful Holy Mother Church in recent decades (though they would probably have the decency and good sense not to use such an awful term, but I feel that is the one that is the most descriptive), and we can expect the faithful remnant – a term I was surprised to see Bishop Gracida, whom I had failed to read for many months, using over and over again on his blog – to be treated as badly or worse by the establishment church as were the “recusants” of Merrye Ol’ several centuries ago.

The tactics, liturgical changes, and theology are virtually identical to the most militant, leftist wing of the protestant revolutionaries of Elizabethan times, too.

But I’ll let Bishop Gracida make his points, and add a few comments.  This commentary was an answer to a question asked by a 70 year old Catholic regarding that septuagenarian’s sense that the Church of today is not the one he grew up in – when the Church fails, where do we go?:

Don’t you realize that you have become part of the Remnant?

Your situation, our situation, is analogous to the situation in which Catholics found themselves in 16th Century England.  All of a sudden Catholics woke up and found that the Church in which they had grown up had changed.  The head of the Church in England, the Archbishop of Canterbury had come under the influence of liberals and progressives like Martin Luther and John Calvin.  Worse, the King, Henry VIII, had become a serial adulterer and he felt it was ok for him to ‘re-marry’ and still receive Holy Communion while living in an adulterous relationship because the good of the Nation required it. [or the good of the groin -as Henry fell deeper and deeper into total incontinence, even the pretense he was doing all his adulterating for “the good of the nation” dropped away]   And to put a proper face on it the King declared himself the Head of the Church, the Liturgy of the Mass changed with the genius [“genius”] of Archbishop Cranmer and all of a sudden Catholics in England woke up and found that they had become Anglicans.

Well, not ALL Catholics.  Some, like the author of the above article still considered themselves to be Catholics, not Anglicans and because they now constituted a small number of people compared to their Anglican neighbors they became a Remnant of the Catholic Church.

That is what you are.  That is what many of us are.

And as a consequence, we are going to experience persecution.  Not the same kind of persecution that English Catholics experienced under Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. [Ummm……wait and see. It might get pretty close, at least so far as being treated as heretics, schismatics, outsiders, and hateful bigots] You will cherish the Traditional Latin Mass when you can find it and you will learn to avoid the absurdities liberal priests and bishops introduce into the Novus Ordo Masses.

Just as English Catholics learned to avoid Anglican Masses celebrated by priests who were ordained not to offer the sacrifice of Jesus Christ but to set the table for a community meal, you will seek out priests, bishops (yes, and even popes) who manifest their belief in the Incarnate Lord Jesus Christ who suffered and died for us and who revealed his plan for us in the 2000 year magisterium of the Church we have possessed up to the present pontificate.

More from Bishop Gracida here, on why he signed the filial correction.

Lord, what good could be done with a few more such men.  Of course, he’s retired, and so it’s a lot easier for him to speak – and probably therein lies very much of the problem.

I’m not quite certain what the good bishop means about seeking out “popes who manifest their belief in the Incarnate Lord….” except that I’m certain he doesn’t meaning finding our own little Pope Michaels, et. al., to follow.  I am sure he means we turn to the popes of the past, the holy fathers who safely guided the Church with a far surer hand than the present trustee of the diocese of Rome.

At any rate it seems Bishop Gracida has become much more clear in his appreciation of the crisis facing the Church and the reality of the tiny number of the faithful. But our paucity of numbers is not a reason to lose hope, as I pray the next post may elucidate unsurreptitiously.

Today I can use my big boy words!