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Poland Passes Bill to Eliminate Most Sunday Commerce by 2020 November 29, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, Domestic Church, episcopate, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Restoration, sanctity, Society, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Poland continues its rapid ascent to become the most Catholic country in the world.  The lower house has passed a bill to ban most all Sunday shopping by 2020, and the Senate looks likely to approve.  Amazingly, the bishop’s conference is somewhat opposed to the bill, because it does not, in their minds, go far enough.  Can I imagine the USCCB taking such a strong, unequivocal stand?  Not very easily:

Polish MPs have approved a bill that will phase out Sunday shopping by 2020.

Initially proposed by trade unions, the idea received the support of the ruling conservative Law and Justice Party, who want to allow workers to spend more time with their families.

The Sejm, the lower house of Poland’s parliament, passed the bill by 254 to 156 to restrict Sunday shopping to the first and last Sunday of the month until the end of 2018, only on the last Sunday in the month in 2019, and to ban it totally starting in 2020. It will still be permitted, however, on the Sundays before major holidays such as Christmas. Some bakeries and online shops will also be exempt.

The bill will now pass to the Senate, and then to President Andzrej Duda for approval.

In a statement, the Polish bishops’ conference said the bill did not go far enough, and that everyone should be free from work on Sundays.

I don’t disagree, excepting those who perform vital public services, such as doctors and nurses at hospitals, emergency workers, and, of course, muslim or Hindu 24 hour convenience store/gas station attendants.

Seriously, I still remember a time when, on Christmas day at least, the streets were pretty much empty.  This would have been the late 80s, even after the Sunday blue laws had been repealed here in Texas (which I think happened around ’82 or ’83).  The only places that were open were a few gas station/convenience stores staffed by surly Sikhs.  How unimaginable it would have been, back then, at the height of the Cold War, to think that in 30 year’s time, formerly communist Poland would be leading at least some kind of Catholic restoration, while the United States and the West generally would be sinking into a soft leftist sexularist dystopia?

I don’t think these “extra” shopping days have boosted the economy at all, they’ve just transferred commerce from one day to another.  I find especially grating all these “Black Friday” and “Day After Christmas” sales that start at noon on the holiday itself (and soon, will probably just subsume the entire holiday).

I think allowing shopping on Sunday has had a deleterious effect on the sanctity of the Lord’s Day and people’s appreciation of it. I think it’s helped peel people away from Christianity, which is probably why it was pushed in the first place.  For most people, Sunday is just another day.  It no longer has any special significance, except maybe during football season or because it’s the 2nd day of the weekend.  There is little sense of family togetherness, even on a secular level, and barely any more religious significance to the day.

So good on the Poles for taking at least this first, partial step.  Hopefully they will move forward even more to end all non-essential trade on Sundays.

h/t reader MFG

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Comments

1. The Lord's Blog - November 30, 2017

I AGREE TOTALLY IN ALL CAPS!

2. The Lord's Blog - November 30, 2017

Reblogged this on Jean'sBistro2010's Blog and commented:
SUNDAYS OFF DEFINITELY……………

3. MFG - November 30, 2017

Tantum,

Tnx for posting. I’m wondering if you remember from the 1980s how people treated Saturdays? I seem to recall most people did their chores like yard work on Saturday and shopping etc and spent Sundays resting or with family (or church). Was that your memory or just my false impressions.

Speaking of blue laws the county outside of NYC (Bergen, NJ) still has blue laws to this day!

4. NickD - November 30, 2017

I wish I could move to Poland. But, better to be “salt and light” “in a strange land,” I think. Still, good on the Polakom!


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