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Dr. Christopher Dawson on the Fundamental Anti-Christian Religious Nature of the Left February 22, 2018

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Christendom, cultural marxism, different religion, error, General Catholic, history, horror, persecution, Revolution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, Society, unadulterated evil.
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Dr. Christopher Dawson was one of the greatest Catholic historians and sociologists of the modern era, a man capable of amassing voluminous knowledge and collating it down to a sensible, digestible whole that relatively educated masses could imbibe.  He wrote a number of books, mostly now held by Ignatius (which makes me wonder the degree to which they have been edited for content uncomfortable to the post-conciliar zeitgeist) but there are other titles available from other sources, and you can still find pre-conciliar copies of his works every now and then.

One of the most interesting of his works was The Gods of Revolution, which argued that the French Revolution – the progenitor of the modern Left and all subsequent revolutionary movements – was primarily motivated by the desire to promulgate a new religion and moral order for society, both of which were antithetical to the hated religion and moral order of Catholicism and the Ancien Regime.  Now this realization may be old hat to many readers, and Dawson was hardly the first to make this claim, but in an age where history and science are dealt with, especially in the academic sense, from an overwhelmingly materialist and rationalist perspective, Dawson’s analysis is both refreshing and helpful.  I think there some gems in the excerpts below that may help you in your exchanges with the forces of revolution/post-modernism you may encounter.

Or, it was at least interesting to me, and interesting enough to post, so I shall make you suffer through it, if you read to the end.  The excerpts below come from pages 65-66 and 84-85 of this short book (the excerpt starts rather abruptly, discussing the Jacobin Clubs, the focal point of French revolutionary ferment, as being also the religious center of that movement):

The clubs were in fact the churches of the new religion.  “How was the Christian religion  established?” asks a Jacobin writer.  “By the preaching of the apostles of the Gospel.  How can we firmly establish the [new French] Constitution? By the mission of the apostles of liberty and equality. Each [Jacobin club] should take charge of the neighboring country districts. It is enough to send an enlightened and zealous patriot with instructions which he will adapt to the locality; he should also provide himself with a copy of the Declaration of the Rights [of Man]  , the Constitution, the Almanack du Pere Gerard [a scurrilous source of anti-Church calumnies], and a good tract against fanaticism, and a good model of a pike. [I’m sure you can imagine what that is for.  But it might be helpful to ponder who the cult of liberty was spread in our own nation, and who the apostles were of that new religion, whether its founders intended it to be one or not, it has taken on many overtones of religion nonetheless.]

In many respects the clubs had inherited and absorbed the traditions of eighteenth century Freemasonry………[The clubs] possessed the same ideal of optimistic deism and claimed in the same way as the Freemasons to represent the fulfillment of the Christian ideals of fraternity, charity, and morality……….But the religion of the Jacobins was a far more definite and dogmatic theory than that of the Masons had ever been.  From the first it possessed its creed in the Declaration of Rights and its scriptures on the Social Contract and it gradually developed a regular cultus and ritual centering round the Altar of the Fatherland, the Tree of Liberty, the Book of the Constitution, and addressed to deified abstractions like Reason, Liberty, Nature, and the Fatherland [Which were precisely the objects antichrist directed the false religion of satanic-dominated humankind in Robert Hugh Benson’s Lord of the World]…….[[this new revolutionary religion] was a religion of human salvation, the salvation of the world by the power of man set free by Reason.  The Cross has been replaced by the Tree of Liberty, the Grace of God by the Reason of Man, and Redemption by Revolution. [And here I think Dawson gives as good a description of the totality of the opposition of the new religion of sexular pagan leftism to Christianity as I’ve read.  Benson does an excellent job of prognosticating how this new secular religion will move as it seeks to replace Christianity, and forecasts a sad and infinitely trying future for the Church and faithful souls.  What Benson did not predict was that virtually the entire institutional Church might join the false cult of man.]

This creed was by no means peculiar to the Jacobins; it as common to all the liberal idealists from the Illuminati to Blake, and from Shelley to Victor Hugo.  But with the Jacobin Society it acquired the external organization of a sect, with a strict discipline, a rigid standard of orthodoxy, and a fanatical intolerance to other creeds.   From the first the Jacobins had thrown themselves into the persecution of the Church with the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, and the resultant conflict with the nonjuring Catholics was largely responsible for the sectarian bitterness and persecuting spirit of the Jacobin Society. [today, that spirit has been taken up by the more leftward segments of the democrat party in this country and numerous other parties in the West in the various parliamentary democracies, with the same persecuting spirit and the same fanatical adherence to leftist orthodoxy.  In fact, Leftism has continued a steady process of metastasizing, growing ever more extreme in belief and in the amoral society they wish to achieve.]

…………[Thus] the Revolution was no longer satisfied with the liberal Catholicism of the Constitutional Church [the false, heretical, Gallican state “church” set up with the help of apostate bishops and priests who feared men more than God, just as Francis seeks to support in China today], it had come to regard Christianity itself as a counter-revolutionary force which must be destroyed in order to make way for the new religion of humanity.  As early as 26 September 1792 Fouche’ had announced at Nevers that he thought it was his mission “to substitute teh wroship of the Republic and natural morality for the superstitious cults to which the people still unfortunately adhere,” and in the following month at Lyons he staged an elaborate anti-Christian demonstration in which a donkey wearing a cope and mitre dragged a missal and the Gospels through the streets.  During the autumn all the churches in Paris were closed, Notre Dame became the Temple of Reason, and the Constitutional “bishop” of Paris, Gobel, with his leading clergy, made a public renunciation of their ministry at the bar of the Convention………..

——–End Quote——

There is much more that is great in the book, but Dawson writes compactly and densely, making it difficult to pull out excerpts that make much sense on their own.  I’ve read three books by Dawson now and  have enjoyed them a great deal, but I am looking forward to something a bit more polemical in Coulombe.  But that will be some months off, I have some other history to go through first, including a study of the man who set the entire rationalist/materialist/leftist train in motion, Luther.

 

 

 

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Comments

1. Numbskull - February 23, 2018

Thanks for the excerpts, looks like an interesting read. Will have to check Dr. Dawson out. Whenever I tell fellow Catholics that Victor Hugo was an anti-Catholic bigot, and his book “Les Miserables” is a subtle attack on the Church, they give me a cold hard stare like I’m some kind of killjoy.
T-blogo, have read any of E. Michael Jones books, such as The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit? Highly recommend. As he writes: You cannot understand history, until you understand the role of the Jew as protagonist of anti-Logos. This book is a huge eye-opener. He also talks about the Jacobites in his book Libido Domandi. It’s really all about promoting sexual licentiousness in order to gain control over the peoples.

Tantumblogo - February 23, 2018

I only read one book by Jones, his “biography” of Cardinal Krol, which was a type of biography I really don’t like, an elaborate cultural pastiche with very little actual biography, like the type Neil Sheehan pioneered.

So I haven’t read his stuff since. Perhaps I should.

Numbskull - February 23, 2018

His books are often long and tend to meander, but he usually ends up tying the pieces together. He has plenty of youtube videos uploaded, below is a link to one of my favorites. He is not an anti-Semite, but an anti-Judaizer. As Catholics all were, at least until Vatican II and Nostra Aetate. His Culture Wars magazine is also good.

Logos vs. Anti-Logos as the pivot of Human History

Numbskull - February 23, 2018

2. Tim - February 23, 2018

Looks interesting, I will have to read it sometime. I’m only 50 years behind on my Catholic reading list!


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