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Some Wonderful Bits of Catholic Culture April 4, 2018

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, Ecumenism, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Latin Mass, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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I’ve found a “new” channel on  Youtube called Holy Faith TV.  It’s not that new, it’s been around almost a  year, but it’s new to me.

They’ve got a lot of great traditional Catholic content and some really outstanding history.  How about this incredible color video of Venerable Pius XII:

And here is a video from what was then a mainstream educational film company on the jubilee year of 1950.  Can you imagine Scholastic doing a reverential and respectful video on the Church today?  How much, and how much for the worse, our society has changed since then.

“…….here lies a spiritual power that no godless philosophy may hope to vanquish.”  Take it to heart, leftists!

If an audience featuring Pius XII wasn’t good enough, how about Mass from 1948, offered in St. Peter’s. Sadly it is in black and white:

And here you go, marking the end of glory and the beginning of the auto-demolition of the Faith, a film on the death of Pius XII and coronation of John XXIII, before the fanon and sede gestatoria were scrapped by John’s successor:

 

It’s not all from the 50s.  There is content dating at least back to Saint Pius X. And some of it is more modern commentary, from a wide diversity of sources, from people known well to this blog like Fr. Michael Rodriguez and Bishop Athanasius Schneider, to more esoteric sources.  I can’t say I’ve watched much of the commentary, but as for the historical stuff, I love it.  So much more like that!

Apparently Youtube contains just part of the content, there is a website that ostensibly has more but I haven’t really had time to check it out.  Perhaps you will, and if you do, feel free to share anything of interest you may find!

As always, of course my happiness at finding this channel is not necessarily an endorsement of everything on it.  But I think there is quite a bit good to find there.

And it’s not all strictly Catholic.  There’s actually quite a bit from the Orthodox Church on the channel.  For an example, here is Patriarch Kirill, primate of the Russian Orthodox Church, taking on the cultural masters in a way the last six popes have generally failed to do, with occasional exceptions from John Paul II and Benedict.  In fact, he proclaims a truth that is readily apparent to most believing Christians of any Church, sect, or stripe: godless elites want to destroy Christianity:

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Comments

1. Juanita Young - April 4, 2018

Thank you so much for this…new to me….Nita Young in Kenai, Alaska….

2. Dismas - April 5, 2018

One of your readers cited a book “The Barbarian Bible” a while back and I bought it and am reading it. That author would assert that Putin is the Puppet and Kirril the Master. I find it an interesting and provocative read – generally quite insightful although I’ll adopt a wait and see attitude on some of his predictions.

I thank that reader for the recommendation and I apologize for disremembering his name.

Greetings, Tantum!

BTW, when I watch the antics of this clown pope, I am reminded of our first clown pope. JPII was to Jorge what Ed McMahon was to Johhny Carson.

Billy Bob - April 5, 2018

Asshat. You besmirch a great Saint like Saint John Paul II. Your hubris will lead you to hell.

Dismas - April 5, 2018

William Robert:

I do not besmirch him. I place him in the same category as the other great saints of the Newchurch, those already “canonized” by the same rules inspired by JPII himself and those yet to come (Paul VI, Bergoglio and Martin Luther as a few examples). As in all of this, there are silver linings on these clouds. Just as Bergoglio is helping the scales fall from many eyes, so will the canonization of Luther and Bergoglio help many to see what the charade of “canonization” has become for the Newchurch – sort of an “Oscar”.

If a man purposely acts the clown, is another man wrong in noticing and commenting on the fact?

But in another sense I owe you a debt of gratitude and I thank you for correcting me. Given the great damage JPII inflicted upon the Church during his pontificate and all of the means which he took to diminish the Church I harbor anger toward him. The anger is justified, but unkind comments are not. I plan to confess this fault, as I have before. I might return the favor by suggesting that you consider the place unkind comments have in discussion as well.

On the other hand, for those who have not become aware, it seems salutary that they consider that a Bergoglio did not materialize from the ether; that the way was paved for him by his immediate predecessors. Bergoglio was not a mistake; he was a plan.

Please pray that I not go to hell, as I promise to do for you. I personally pray for the soul of Karol Wojytla every day at every Mass. I like the man. I think he would be fun to be around. But given his importance and significant impact, I’ll not pretend that he was other than he was.

Of course, if one truly believes he is a saint in Heaven, then one would not pray for him. Thus the ironic result of his “canonization”. I do not wonder which he would be preferring at this moment.

Rather than enter a non-productive discussion, I might just suggest that you look a bit into some of the actions of JPII that could arguably have paved the way for that other great saint – Bergoglio. I’ll not enumerate those; examples abound for the person interested in the straight scoop.

Camper - April 5, 2018

Billy bob, please don’t swear. If JPII was a saint, he could not have been a very great one. There were far too many scandals in his pontificate. At least St. Augustine and St. Francis of Assisi gave up their sins before being canonized.

DM - April 7, 2018

JP II a “great Saint”. Yeah, right. Sure hope you were being sarcastic.

Camper - April 8, 2018

Dear Billy,
I’m not good at arguing it, but some trads argue that the canonization process does not demand assent after Vatican II because it was watered down. On the article about the HBO series “Young Pope”, there was a gratuitously insulting Protestant whom many of us urged to have more charity. He refused to apologize and he got banned. I don’t want to be threatening, and we understand that you are distressed by our thinking, but we try to be charitable.

3. Amos - April 5, 2018

Pius XII: The last stable Pope.

Numbskull - April 5, 2018

everything went to hell w Roncalli.

Camper - April 5, 2018

Hey Numbskull. Haven’t seen you in a while. I agree about Roncalli. Hope you are having a wonderful Easter break.

Numbskull - April 7, 2018

Thanks Camper, same to you!

Camper - April 8, 2018

I am. I’ve eaten Gouda cheese twice, as well as Muenster cheese and a ton of junk food. Ann Barnhardt says that it is traditional to have “fat on the walls” during the Octave of Easter. I hope I haven’t overdone it, but I needed to celebrate.

4. Camper - April 5, 2018

I would like to remind everybody. Easter lasts eight days! Traditionally, Catholics took eight days off for Easter. Most men have to work, and women never stop working anyways, but hopefully we can all squeeze some vacation time into Easter like it deserves. Ann Barnhardt points out that we are supposed to celebrate Easter so strongly that there will be “fat on the walls”!

5. PD Scott - April 5, 2018

Thank you for the Holy Faith TV channel. I really enjoyed watching an episode!

6. PD Scott - April 5, 2018

I agree with Dismas and Camper in references to Vatican II popes– and finally.
May Our Lord, Jesus Christ bless all during this holy Easter season and may He
have mercy on those struggling to hold on to the Faith.

7. David - April 6, 2018

Tantumblogo

I remember the Scholastic and Coronet films as a kid. Elementary school 1970s – things about life, eating habits, social skills, map reading, occupations, health, etc. I don’t think the majority of public schools show these films (or equivalent) anymore. They were good teachable moments for 6 to 10 years olds circa 1974. I wish schools would return to showing some of these – some are posted on YouTube – and the rights may be public domain now.


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