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Diocese News: Good Father Paul Weinberger Reassigned from St. William in Greenville to St. Monica in Dallas [UPDATED] September 6, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Dallas Diocese, General Catholic, Holy suffering, Latin Mass, Liturgy, manhood, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, Virtue.
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[UPDATE: COMMENTS CLOSED.  You people know I have your e-mails and IPs, right?  It’s kind of obvious when you all use the same one. This campaign of character assassination will not be permitted to continue.]

This is one of those sad/happy, good news-bad news kinda things.  Good local priest Father Paul Weinberger (as to the good, you can find several instances of this by searching his name on this blog) has been reassigned from his role as pastor of St. William parish in Greenville, on the periphery of the Diocese, to St. Monica parish in north Dallas.  I just spoke with Father Weinberger, and he advises that he will be priest in residence at Saint Monica, and will serve publicly there offering Mass and Confession, but only after a period of personal time in which he takes care of some long-delayed matters related to the estates of his deceased parents.

I say this is good news/bad news because it is bittersweet anytime a priest is reassigned, especially one that had been so long at one parish as Father Weinberger had.  He had been at St. William about 18 years and had expressed hopes of serving there for the rest of his priestly ministry. In that time, many families had moved to the Greenville area to enjoy both a more rural manner of living and to take advantage of Father Weinberger’s very solid catechesis, reverent liturgy, and abundant Confession. Obviously many of those people are very sad to see Father Weinberger go.  Father Weinberger is being replaced by one of the Diocese’s younger priests, Father Edwin Leonard.

But now, Father Weinberger is moving on to St. Monica, a centrally located and well known parish, where many more souls may take advantage of his gifts.  I’m certain he will be well received.  Whether Father Weinberger will be offering Latin Mass at St. Monica or publicly performing other devotions such as the nightly Rosary processions and frequent confessions is not known at this time (uh, because I forgot to ask).

Our family attended St. William for several years before eventually, and not without some sadness, moving on to Mater Dei and the full time Traditional Latin Mass.  We have missed Father Weinberger over the years and look forward to being able to see him again, now that he is much closer to Irving. It was a nearly hour to drive out to Greenville, now he’ll only be about 15 minutes away.

Please pray for Father Weinberger and the parishioners of St. William. Losing a long time beloved priest can be very painful. I understand that at least some of the families will be traveling to Mater Dei on Sundays, so you Mater Dei readers be on the lookout for new faces (I know……..which ones?)!  I will provide updates on Father Weinberger and his service at St. Monica as they become available.

Comments

1. Camper - September 6, 2019

Hmmm…is something wrong with this picture?

2. kendall66 - September 6, 2019

Thanks for the prayers, always, but, as a parishioner of St Williams for much longer than Father Paul was assigned there, I can hardly wait for a new pastor to arrive. Some elements of Father Paul’s priestly ministry had become increasingly spiritually problematic, and potentially harmful.

[Tantumblogo edit, my comments follow to many comments and not just this particular one] – This is fine. I’m sorry you feel that way. I understand that feelings regarding Father Weinberger at St. William had been split after a very deliberate campaign against him. I have seen these before. I would be shocked if anything untoward had developed in his ministry, but unfortunately we live in an incredibly fallen age. If anyone can offer any actual evidence other than vague accusations and hearsay I’d be willing to listen. I will offer in advance that my family and I attended St. William for several years and still know several families there quite well. All of those families are very strong in their defense of Father Weinberger and believe that the campaign waged against him was wholly unjust and unfounded. Most of those families are now moving on to Mater Dei, so God does bring good things from negative events.

From what I am told, Father Weinberger retains his faculties and can offer Mass and hear Confessions as any other priest incardinated in this Diocese.

Reference to the Dallas Charter is as bit of a canard, as far as I’m concerned. The Dallas Charter is an extremely poor and unjust policy that was imposed far less to keep children safe than to keep bishiops safe from being personally sued and potentially jailed for their very public and nefarious crimes. I personally am not “in accord” with the Dallas Charter in that I refuse to take safe environment training, for the reason that the Dallas Charter imposes the penalty for (particularly) bishops’ (and, yes, priests’) horrid behavior on the laity. So, I cannot serve in various roles. There are many aspects of the Dallas Charter, some of which are very much on the nebulous and silly side – you’ll have to be much more specific than that in trying to attack Father’s good name. I find the accusations that Father “surrounds himself with altar boy eye candy” far more revealing of the accuser than Father. That accusation in and of itself speaks of a powerful personal motive behind this attack.

As to why Father chose reassignment to retirement, well, he’s both young for retirement and none of us have any idea of what transpired between him and Bishop Burns/Bishop Kelly. Those conversations were private and remain so to my understanding. From what has been described to me, anyone who claims to know different, to be privy to all the details, is making a false statement.

Finally, admiration for Father Weinberger goes far deeper than “a little bit of Latin.” It goes to years of extremely sound catechesis and spiritual direction given in and out of the confessional. It goes to years of growing a moribund parish that was in severe financial arrears when he arrived, and of personal suffering to achieve that. It goes to years of worthy and reverent liturgy, up to and including refusing to permit girls to serve at the altar of sacrifice. And on and on. He is a very solid priest, as solid as this Diocese has produced in the past 30 years as far as everything I have been able to garner on this situation – which I have been following for some weeks. I didn’t just fall into this out of the clouds.

So, yes, I am definitely biased in favor of Father Weinberger’s good name, as all Catholics are obligated to do for anyone’s good name, unless and until there is some concrete evidence to the contrary. To this I am willing to listen, but it must be far more than anything I’ve seen in the comments. What I see in the comments is a lot of hurt and more than a little bit of unhinged behavior.

3. Camper - September 6, 2019

Tantum and community, why would somebody telling the truth use the handle “666” on this blog? Anybody?

Camper - September 7, 2019

I don’t know anything about it. I’m neutral.

4. Larry Bednarz - September 7, 2019

I’ve known Fr Paul for years going back to Blessed Sacrament days and he is nothing but a terrific priest: catholic catechesis (not watered down); Gregorian Chant; guest speakers offering sound teaching; regular confession; abundant amount of Masses especially on Sunday so all can attend; nightly rosary processions and a lover of Our Lady. If that makes you a “nasty individual”, then there seems to be a bit of projection going on here from those of you hiding behind your own pseudonyms. If you can’t make a statement without hiding behind a fake name, perhaps you should put a lid on it.

5. Camper - September 7, 2019

I don’t know the priest, but either his detractors or he is badly wrong. How could it be any other way? That’s the way it seems to me.
The bishop might not get a lot of sympathy on this blog. Farrell certainly didn’t, but who knows what Burns is like?

6. Sissy - September 8, 2019

My husband and I followed Fr. Paul from Blessed Sacrament to St. Williams when he was moved there 15 years ago and have been parishioners ever since. If some of these posters are parishioners there I am having second thoughts about remaining. We drove the 45 miles there and back to get a seven course meal and not a snack. He is a priest for Christ and not for himself. If he is rude and nasty then so was St. Pio. I have known and loved Fr. Paul for 20 years and the thing I love greatly is his directness; he doesn’t water down anything and some of you folks can’t handle it. You like the Burger King gospel…”Have it your way.” Try that at the judgement seat!

It is so sad when humans choose to see and hear with their bodily eyes and not with the eyes and ears of the soul. You mistake someone who is dedicated to Christ for someone who is mean and nasty. Do you think he cares what you think? No, he only cares what God, who will be his Judge, thinks.

Denise Wood - September 8, 2019
7. Camper - September 9, 2019

I want some popcorn!

8. Richard Malcolm - September 9, 2019

This comment box certainly has gotten spicy.

9. GregoryW - September 9, 2019

Rumors on the street, and you, Liberanosatraddie and a few others are spreading rumors. Shame on you! You have no proof of anything you have said. You have no humility because all this has stemmed from your lack thereof.

Catechism of the Catholic Church

This need to promote truth also requires the individual to avoid falsehood at all cost, especially that which seeks to damage the reputation of another:

2477 Respect for the reputation of persons forbids every attitude and word likely to cause them unjust injury. He becomes guilty:
– of rash judgment who, even tacitly, assumes as true, without sufficient foundation, the moral fault of a neighbor;
– of detraction who, without objectively valid reason, discloses another’s faults and failings to persons who did not know them;
– of calumny who, by remarks contrary to the truth, harms the reputation of others and gives occasion for false judgments concerning them.

It is not enough to not have evidence that you are wrong. Instead, the moral burden is on the individual to only speak when they know they are correct.

Salacious statements breed scandal, and scandal threatens all of society. Lying is a grave offense against God, as the Catechism makes clear through repeated citation to the New Testament and the words of Christ. Although rumors and gossip might seem innocent of being lies, they breed resentment and hate, and they seek to damage someone’s reputation publicly, making it a grave offense in itself:


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