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10th Annual White Rose Women’s Center Fundraising Dinner Oct 7th August 22, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Abortion, awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, contraception, Dallas Diocese, fightback, fun, General Catholic, Grace, priests, sanctity, Society, Spiritual Warfare, Virtue.
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I feel bad about the timing for St. Joseph’s Helpers, the fundraising arm of the White Rose Women’s Centers in the Dallas area.  Their 10th annual benefit dinner featuring Father Shenan Boquet of Human Life International is on the same date as the major Fatima conference featuring Cardinal Burke and a bevy of many other major draws.  White Rose does such wonderful work as a Catholic crisis pregnancy center, I pray this fundraiser is still well-attended in spite of the conflict.  One must imagine, however, that a pro-life fundraiser and the Fatima conference are going to compete in some respects for interest from the same group of faithful Catholics in the area.

Having said that, the Diocese of Dallas loves to boast of the fact that there are well over 1 million Catholics in the diocese, so surely there should be more than enough to make both events well attended. It’s just a shame two such desirable, high profile events such as this have to overlap to some extent (thinking, though, the Fatima conference will wrap up an hour or so before the White Rose dinner – that is, if you don’t go to the Cardinal Burke honorary dinner at the conclusion of the Fatima conference!).

At any rate, tix are $150 each or $1500 for a table for 10.  Most details below.  You can register here.

Check Out This Site Dedicated Towards Counter-Revolution…… August 14, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in catachesis, Christendom, cultural marxism, fightback, General Catholic, Restoration, Revolution, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership.
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………and monarchy.  The latter seems so “extreme” and “anti-American” to many that merely proposing the concept is enough to get one branded a crazy – which goes to show just how thorough the cultural dominance of the revolutionary rhetoric of the “Enlightenment” and the left-libertine ethos it encourages has been.

The current left-liberal socio-political paradigm is, to a very great extent, built, and I increasingly believe deliberately so, upon ignorance of history.  Here I’ve lived in Texas my entire life, have been a Catholic for nearly 20 years, yet I had never heard of the Cristiada or the 100+ year war by the various totalitarian Mexican governments against the Church until 2009 or so.  I had no idea there was a mass popular reaction against repressive, authoritarian “liberal” government in a huge nation that borders  on my native state, and with a huge population of expatriates living right there among us.  Many Mexicans themselves are wholly ignorant of the Cristiada or its justifications.

And that is hardly the only example of Catholic reaction to the left-liberal or sexular pagan zeitgeist.  The Austrian government under Dolfuss and, to a lesser extent, Schuschnigg, Francoist Spain and to a lesser extent again the Estado Novo of Salazar’s Portugal,  the Carlist uprisings in Spain against creeping leftism in the 19th century, the War in the Vendee in France, the ……..these are but a few of the better known (and that isn’t very well) examples.

Unfortunately, to date, none of these reactions have been outwardly successful in permanently forestalling the advance of the “enlightenment” ethos.  There are current movements in Hungary and Poland, and possibly some other European states, that are reactions to this ethos and which have a religious (Catholic) flavor, but they have not yet come sufficiently to fruition to dominate the direction of their respective nations.

The endarkenment – my pithy term for the left-liberal/sexular pagan ethos – almost requires this environment.  It insists, and in effect requires all opposition to be presented as “extreme,” the abode of crazies and malcontents of one stripe or another.  This is probably the most valuable and well demonstrated point proven in The Gentle Traditionalist.  This definition causes the endarkenment values to present themselves both as the only reasonable alternative and as inevitable, the practical result of a “scientific society” that has finally pulled itself out of the dark ages of religion and superstition.

Of course, this left-liberal society also contains within itself the seeds of its own destruction.  Critics of the dominant left-liberal culture have noted this for 200 years – unfortunately, most of those critics were even more erroneous, even more extreme in their programs to overcome and ultimately displace the liberal democratic state.

But since that destruction seems to loom before us more and more every day, becoming ever more likely to come to fruition in a cataclysm perhaps even worse than the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, it behooves thinking souls to consider what may come after the crash – or how the crash may be averted if, by some miracle, society can be brought to its senses.

This is a long introduction to a website recommended by good reader MFG comes to mind, a site dedicated towards counter-revolution – for the “enlightenment” has always been first a foremost a revolution, a revolution especially dedicated towards unseating God and His Church.  I haven’t perused all the site  yet, and am not giving an endorsement of all the content therein, but there is at the least some edifying historical content (such as on the Carlist counter-revolutions of Spain), and some serious food for thought on monarchy and the role Tradition must play in shaping a rightly ordered Catholic society.  I am not quite as willing to endorse the denunciations of capitalism and embrace of agrarianism on the site, unless the authors make clear what they are proposing – a basically mid-19th century existence, with most people engaged in exhausting manual toil out in the fields.  Materialism has been a great evil in the world, it is a primary vice of the endarkenment, but I am still dubious of  policies that condemn the vast majority of souls to lives of endless, exhausting manual labor.  On a practical level, it’s an impossible sell.  That is why distributists virtually never get into specifics about what the world would look like should their economic views be put into practice.  It sounds nice to say “well, each village would be self-supporting, with farmers growing food and blacksmiths making tools and tailors sewing dresses, etc…….”  But few are willing to admit there would be few or no cars or trucks, little or no electricity, likely no trains or planes, no computers, little communication with the outside world, little if any medicine (antibiotics failing to grow on trees), much less variety of food and a strong likelihood of periodic want if not outright starvation, etc. – everything that was common in the late 18th century.

I’m being a bit harsh, there are some ways some of this could be avoided on a semi-distributist model, but overall it would mean mass sacrifice in standard of living (and life expectancy) for virtually all but the most elite in the monarchist/nobility driven society.  Which, if that’s your program, if you are really convinced that returning to a Catholic moral and social order requires abandoning “capitalism” (whatever one means by that term, capitalism at its essence to me is the free exchange of goods and services at mutually agreed rates) and a return to an agrarian 18th/early 19th century level of existence, fine, but be honest about what this will mean in practical terms, and don’t sell it as a no-cost (or even superior, in material terms) alternative.

But who knows what may come if this massive but fragile beast that is the interconnected socio-political-economic structure of the world today collapses?  Distributism may arise of itself naturally in that case.

In any event, the website does have some good content and I am happy to engage with and be supportive towards any effort aimed at the institution or restoration of a Catholic moral and social order  It also invites you to join the counter-revolution if you are so moved.  The site claims joining may enable you to engage with other like minded individuals. I joined and I will see what results.  I do not know if this website or group has any relation to Tradition, Family, and Property.  Some concerns over TFP were expressed to me recently, and they are not the first I have heard, but I have not really seen these concerns substantiated to any serious degree, as of yet.  Perhaps I will soon enough.

At any rate I have spent far too much time on this today!  Check out the site if you are interested in learning some aspects of little-known Catholic history, and/or are looking for alternatives to the “inevitable” left-liberal materialist ethos.

 

Abortion Is Not a Kind of Martyrdom, Nor Is It a Sacrament August 14, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Abortion, Basics, catachesis, contraception, disaster, error, General Catholic, horror, paganism, persecution, Revolution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sexual depravity, Society, unadulterated evil.
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Another good contribution from Fr. Albert OP and The Fatima Center.  I know some people struggle with this one, including many well meaning pro-lifers – they don’t want to believe God could be so “cruel” as to deny Heaven to a perfect innocent who is murdered in abortion. But this sentiment has many problems, and reveals an ignorance, which while I am certain is entirely innocent, is potentially quite monstrous, or at least severely disordered.

All souls, regardless of any actual sin, stand condemned under Original Sin.  Christ’s Sacrifice effaces the punishment due to Original Sin IF we receive Baptism.  There is no approved way to baptize souls in the womb.  Thus those souls cannot be saved.  Now, God, while infinitely just, is also infinitely merciful, so it is believed He does not condemn souls innocent of actual sin to eternal punishment.  But neither can these souls, still stained by Original Sin, exist in His perfect Presence.  Thus, they go to Limbo, a state of natural happiness but outside the Beatific Vision of God in Heaven.

To cling to the idea that the souls of aborted infants are somehow saved is, in a sense, to either endorse the notion that they are martyrs, and thus receive a Baptism by Blood, or that, monstrously, that abortion somehow constitutes a Sacrament that conveys supernatural Grace and thus allows the soul entrance to Heaven.  Obviously the latter is out, but even the idea that these souls are martyrs is not supported by the Tradition.  To be a martyr one must desire union with Christ, explicitly at least on some level, which is something still-natal infants are incapable of.  Pope Sixtus V regarded the inability of aborted souls to be saved the most heinous aspect of abortion.

However the doctrine of Limbo has never been so specifically defined that it rises to the level of a Dogma.  At least, I am unaware of such a definition, though fully willing to accept such.  If I am correct, there is room for souls to disagree on this matter, though I would regard any opinion that attempts to confer “salvation” on the souls of the aborted as disordered, at best (though surely coming from the best of intentions), not least because of the impact such beliefs have on the mothers considering abortion, where a sense of assurance that their babies will be happy forever in Heaven with God and spared the sufferings of this life serve as a positive inducement to abort, and often amount to a source of infinite impediment to acknowledging the intrinsic evil of this barbaric act.

I’ve covered this matter before but it usually excites some contrary opinions so here is one more explanation:

On a related note, Google and Facebook continue to reveal themselves as thoroughgoing partisans of the culture of death and persecutors of conservatives generally and Christians specifically.  Google and Facebook are funding an effort to stage large protests outside Atlanta-area crisis pregnancy centers, in the hope of having laws passed that force the CPCs to very publicly declare they don’t perform abortions, or at least ruining their reputations.  The ultimate goal is the destruction of CPCs as alternatives to baby murder and as “competition” to the practical baby murder monopoly in the US, Planned Barrenhood.

Google and Facebook are giving thoughtful citizens, and especially Christians, ample reasons to fear and loathe these prying vast repositories of personal data and growing vehicles of politically-motivated repression.  Time to ditch smart phones, especially Android and all the Google apps?  Time to delete the Facebook account, no matter how “useful” it is?

Cardinal Burke Headlining Fatima Conference in Dallas, Irving October 6-7 August 10, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Dallas Diocese, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Our Lady, Restoration, the struggle for the Church, true leadership, Virtue.
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Just in time for the 100th anniversary. Most excellent.  Details below.  There are a number of speakers at the event, mostly drawn from the Catholic Answers crowd:

I learned a lot from Fr. John Trigilio during my initial conversion.  That show Web of Faith he hosted on EWTN was really good for me.  It was my favorite Catholic program for a time.

I also like John Henry Westen.  The guy is a rock, and has faced a lot of persecution for this efforts defending Holy Mother Church and the sanctity of life.

Cardinal Burke is to offer Mass.  No word on whether it will be a TLM or Novus Ordo, but my money would be on the latter, sadly.  The Friday Mass at St. Monica will definitely be Novus Ordo.

The website for the event is here.  The event costs $137 per individual if you buy tickets before Aug 31, after that, $159.

Schedule below:

I’d love to go, but this is too high for us.  Also I will be out of town that weekend at a family reunion in beautiful downtown Harper, Texas.

Great New Father Rodriguez “Sermon” on Our Lady and God’s Supreme Dominion August 9, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Father Rodriguez, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, manhood, Our Lady, persecution, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I said in a previous post what a wonderful collaboration I could imagine between Father Rodriguez and The Fatima Center.  It seems such a collaboration may be flowering, The Fatima Center Youtube channel has uploaded another bit of catechesis from Father, and it’s a very good one:

A few choice quotes/summations: Quoting Pope St. Pius X: Apostasy from God is destroying society (in particular Western Civilization).  All artifice and effort is used to destroy the memory and the knowledge of God, rejecting, most of all, the idea of God’s supreme dominion over man and all creation, because, to the God-hating revolutionaries in and out of the Church, man must be his own God.  Read Guadium Et Spes and see if you don’t pick up a huge whiff of humanist triumphalism .  If St. Pius X’s claims were true 114 years ago, and they demonstrably were, how much more true are they today?  Goodness even questioning the prevailing sexular pagan orthodoxy in measured and scientific tones, with abundance of supporting data, will get you fired from a hugely influential corporation like Google.  What would they do to someone who preached the Truth of Jesus Christ to them -a firing squad?

But what was the Miracle of the Sun really about, but a testimony to God’s Supreme Dominion?  Thus the manifest errors of the world – so much less 100 years ago than they are today! – brought about the greatest, most well documented public miracle in the history of humankind (leaving aside the miracles of God Incarnate).  But how few souls have been moved to change their ways even by such a fantastic demonstration of God’s Holy Dominion over all of the universe.

“We are guilty.  God is truth, and our present world is filled with heresy.  God is holy, and our present world blasphemes and desecrates over and over again.  God is pure, and our present world is filthier than filth with impurity and putrid sins of the flesh, including the abomination of sodomy.”

Our Lady’s answer to the terrible sins of the world, and, yes, even the Church (today), is bipartite: prayer, and penance.  “Penance, penance, penance” she counseled.  She urges us to believe, adore, and hope in God, and always to love him.  Prayer and penance are the most concrete means at our disposal to both demonstrate this love for God and to offset the hatred for God evidenced in so many other souls.

“In order to be happy, we need God.  We need to adore God, honor God, respect God, and obey God.  All the evil darkness and sin in the world can be reduced to two basic ways in which God rejects God: modern man is rejecting God by the outright denial of God’s existence (atheism, at the root of communism, and also secular materialism), and by refusing to believe in God as God has revealed himself – simply put, by rejecting the Catholic religion.  This is one of the root causes of ALL the evil in the world……..It is a terrible sin of our times to think that each one is free to determine how to believe in God (the root error of protestantism).”

“Repeat to yourself often – God is the one who reveals Himself.  I accept and obey, I believe.  That’s what faith means -to believe in God, as He has revealed Himself. ”

“There is only one true religion.  All other religions are false.”  YAY FATHER GOD BLESS YOU for having the fortitude to preach this uncomfortable, often unpopular truth.

Our Lady came to Fatima to warn against the heresy of modernism. In the post-conciliar period, there has unfolded a particularly sinister and diabolical way has been rejected – not outright, and not by individual disobedience – but by disobedience at the highest levels of the Church. There have been ongoing and repeated attempts, ongoing even to this day, to try to change the Catholic religion, dilute it, and shift the focus from the supernatural to the natural, so that it still appears to be Catholic, but in actuality is not.  The purpose of the Catholic religion is not to end world poverty and fight against climate change.  The purpose is to lead souls to know and adore the one true God and so gain the happiness of Heaven. In the post-conciliar period the Catholic religion has been horribly corrupted by attempts to adapt it to the increasingly secular and materialistic culture.  We must conform to the Truth. Our culture must change, and be converted and conform to the Truth.  We cannot alter or dilute the Truth in order to justify how we live.

Well, I’d better leave some for you to watch!  Suffice it to say, this sermon has all the high quality and good for souls one would expect from Father Michael Rodriguez.  God bless him and those other priests, so few in number and often so made to suffer for their love of God and adherence to the Truth He reveals.  Please pray for Father.  His situation remains difficult but he continues to do as much good as he can under the circumstances -and that good is not inconsiderable.

Fr. Albert on Admonishing the Sinner August 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, religious, Restoration, sanctity, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Some interesting thoughts below.  Fr. Albert, a traditional Dominican in Belgium working with The Fatima Center declares admonishing the sinner is a moral duty and failing to do so can be sinful on our part, but then states that the situations wherein we have a positive duty to act are quite rare.  I haven’t a great deal of time to flesh this out today, but this is one of those matters that is very dear to many Catholic hearts and one that does cause quite a bit of division.  See what you make of it:

Do you feel Father Albert “wimps out” towards the end in stating that these admonishments may cause more harm than good and thus the situations where they are required are quite rare?  Or is this necessary prudence.

This matter comes up with some regularity at the local Fraternity parish, where we have had instances of people evidencing great hurt at being corrected by other lay people, and the priests have basically cautioned against such admonishments, asking matters like fraternal correction over immodest dress or how to raise and educate children be left to the priests (with some room for action if the matter is dire or pressing).  Some people very much agree with this stance, while others feel that doing so could lead to rapidly falling standards since priests won’t often have time to make such one-on-one corrections.

I covered this topic in a post a few months ago, so I don’t want to retread that ground all over again, but one thought that has occurred to me in the intervening months is that one’s approach to this matter depends very much on how one views their local traditional community as a whole, and how newcomers and those who err publicly fit into it.  Some hold the view that pretty much everyone who is bothering to come to a traditional Catholic parish is already extremely dedicated, generally trying hard to do their best, and should be given a lot of latitude to “come up to standard” with things like dress or homeschooling or using NFP or whatever hot-button topic.  These same people view the community as quite resilient and able to stand some problematic public displays in the interest of being accommodating and helping the community grow.

Then there are souls who are very concerned about standards, who well know the threats to the traditional practice of the Faith both inside and outside the Church, and who feel that those souls who are failing in certain, quite public, ways pose a threat to the integrity of the community.  They may even have direct experience of communities softening standards and inevitably sliding into mediocrity or worse, total collapse to the culture.  Many of these folks have been traumatized, in a sense, by experiences in Novus Ordo world or the culture generally, and place a high premium on protecting the integrity of the community/parish.  These people are also naturally zealous for the Faith and see its defense as a primary duty, recognizing rightly that a reverent, faithful Catholic parish is an incredibly precious thing, maybe even a vulnerable thing, and very much worthy of protection.

The thing is, neither of these outlooks is wrong.  Thus the tension that exists in many traditional parishes over how to handle matters like fraternal correction.  My natural disposition is much more towards the latter, and I will admit to being a bit suspect of the motives of those who have been in traditional communities a long time and  yet seem to take a certain joy in being non-conformist in various regards, without going into specifics.  I am also one who tries to take correction in the best light, instead of getting instantly offended and hurt and storming out of the place – not that I have not at times disagreed with someone’s well-meaning recommendations.

But, I also don’t want to see rigid communal standards emerge that exclude all but the most zealous, the most rigorous.  Those types of situations have a long history and almost universally end in extremes of opinion and action and communities dividing into hostile camps that eventually disintegrate.  There have been several attempts at utopian Catholic enclaves in the past 200 years and they have all ended badly.

I think prudence is the key.  If you see a lady in a short skirt and stilletos, but wearing a veil, and you’ve never seen her before, maybe cut her a break.  Don’t say anything.  But pray for that person.  If they keep coming and you get to know them a bit, perhaps that relationship will be a grounds to make a very charitable comment some weeks or months down the road if the person does not self-correct.  You and I may think homeschooling is practically the only way to raise a child in this moral sewer but you don’t have to unload that opinion on every soul you encounter.  Prying questions into one’s background and purity tests are not a good way to make an acquaintance.  The examples could go on endlessly, but I assume you get the point.

I would close by saying, if you fall more to one side or the other – the welcoming souls willing to look the other way at times, or the militant defenders of the sanctity of the community – also try to have some charity for those who feel differently from yourself.  If someone thinks it’s better to be more accommodating and less rigorous, that doesn’t make them a bad Catholic.  And those with strong personalities who feel standards should be enforced at all times and who do not shy away from correcting others, they are not necessarily the stereotypical bad rad-trad.

Yes this is another “can’t we all get along” post.  But maybe that’s not such a bad thing, for a group that is already surrounded on all sides and hopelessly outnumbered.  I’ve been reading about some of the failed Crusades to stop the spread of islam of late, and it is heart-breaking the degree to which Catholic division and in-fighting aided the spread of the demonic religion of Mohammad.  Different groups of Catholics refused to aid one another in the Fall of Acre in 1289.

Related.  End trad-Cath circular firing squads!

Briefest Reminder Posts – Assumption and Kolbe Novenas August 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Novenas, Our Lady, Saints, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, Virtue.
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The Assumption Novena properly started yesterday, but you can start today and finish on the feast.  The Novena for Maximilian Kolbe started Saturday but better late than never.

Brief Assumption Novena below:

Mary, Queen Assumed into Heaven, I rejoice that after years of heroic martyrdom on earth, Thou hast at last been taken to the throne
prepared for Thee in heaven by the Holy Trinity.

Lift my heart with Thee in the glory of Thy Assumption above the dreadful touch of sin and impurity. Teach me how small earth becomes when viewed from heaven. Make me realize that death is the triumphant gate
through which I shall pass to Thy Son, and that someday my body shall rejoin my soul in the unending bliss of heaven.

From this earth, over which I tread as a pilgrim, I look to Thee for help. I ask for this favor:

(State your intention here…)

When my hour of death has come, lead me safely to the presence of Jesus to enjoy the vision of my God for all eternity together with Thee.

Novena to St. Maximilian Kolbe:

O St. Maximilian Kolbe,

faithful follower of St. Francis,

inflamed by the love of God

you dedicated your life to the practice of virtue

and to works of the apostolate.

Look down with favor upon us

who devoutly confide in your intercession, especially for:

(here mention your special requests)

 

Having consecrated yourself to the Immaculate Virgin Mary,

you inspired countless souls to a holy life

and various forms of the apostolate

in order to do good to others

and to spread the kingdom of God.

Obtain for us the grace by our lives and labors

to draw many souls to Christ.

 

In your close conformity to our Divine Savior

you reached such an intense degree of love

that you offered your life to save a fellow prisoner.

Implore God that we,

inflamed by such ardent charity,

may through our living faith and our apostolic works

witness Christ to others,

and thus merit to join you in the blessed vision of God.

Amen.

Praying as a family has such enormous spiritual efficacy!  Perhaps you could have as an intention for your Novena the conversion of this nation and our fallen world – or maybe better yet the conversion of the leadership of the Church and the restoration of the Church’s human element.

Whatever your intention, Novenas as a beautiful aspect of Catholic Tradition!

Catholic Tradition in Prayer: Saint Patrick’s Breastplate August 3, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Interior Life, Saints, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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According to tradition, St. Patrick wrote this hymn in AD 433 for divine protection before successfully converting the Irish king Leoghaire and his subjects from paganism to Christianity.  The breastplate of course references Ephesians vi:12-18, wherein St. Paul describes the various armaments we must take on (those of prayer and virtue) in order to do battle with the principalities and powers of this world.  So the name is quite apropos for the combat the great Saint of Ireland engaged in in converting a violent pagan country to the sweet yoke of Jesus Christ.

Some dispute whether the prayer really is that ancient, but at any rate it is beautiful, and since I had never come across it before reading The Gentle Traditionalist, I figured you may not be familiar with it, either.  Or maybe it’s widely known, I really don’t know.  At any rate, here it is:

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness
of the Creator of creation.

I arise today
Through the strength of Christ’s birth with His baptism,
Through the strength of His crucifixion with His burial,
Through the strength of His resurrection with His ascension,
Through the strength of His descent for the judgment of doom.

I arise today
Through the strength of the love of cherubim,
In the obedience of angels,
In the service of archangels,
In the hope of resurrection to meet with reward,
In the prayers of patriarchs,
In the predictions of prophets,
In the preaching of apostles,
In the faith of confessors,
In the innocence of holy virgins,
In the deeds of righteous men.

I arise today, through
The strength of heaven,
The light of the sun,
The radiance of the moon,
The splendor of fire,
The speed of lightning,
The swiftness of wind,
The depth of the sea,
The stability of the earth,
The firmness of rock.

I arise today, through
God’s strength to pilot me,
God’s might to uphold me,
God’s wisdom to guide me,
God’s eye to look before me,
God’s ear to hear me,
God’s word to speak for me,
God’s hand to guard me,
God’s shield to protect me,
God’s host to save me
From snares of devils,
From temptation of vices,
From everyone who shall wish me ill,
afar and near.

I summon today
All these powers between me and those evils,
Against every cruel and merciless power
that may oppose my body and soul,
Against incantations of false prophets,
Against black laws of pagandom,
Against false laws of heretics,
Against craft of idolatry,
Against spells of witches and smiths and wizards,
Against every knowledge that corrupts man’s body and soul;
Christ to shield me today
Against poison, against burning,
Against drowning, against wounding,
So that there may come to me an abundance of reward.

Christ with me,
Christ before me,
Christ behind me,
Christ in me,
Christ beneath me,
Christ above me,
Christ on my right,
Christ on my left,
Christ when I lie down,
Christ when I sit down,
Christ when I arise,
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me,
Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me,
Christ in every eye that sees me,
Christ in every ear that hears me.

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness
of the Creator of creation.

———-End Quote————

It’s rather pretty and, I would say, quite lyrically Irish, is it not? I like it quite a bit. I hope to add this regularly to my prayer rotation.  God willing.

Perhaps this prayer might be invoked with the great evangelist Saint Patrick that the Church might be gifted with men of similar faith, devotion, and willingness to speak the truth in our own age.  The Church desperately needs some new Saints to reinvigorate the remaining faithful and begin converting the fallen away masses.

PS there are shorter versions of this prayer.  They basically are limited to the last half of the above.

Traditional Book Review: The Gentle Traditionalist by Roger Buck July 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Christendom, cultural marxism, General Catholic, history, Latin Mass, paganism, Restoration, Revolution, scandals, secularism, sickness, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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Kind reader skeinster, who I know and value so much in real life for her perspectives as a longtime trad and observer of trads, gave me a copy of Roger Buck’s The Gentle Traditionalist to read.  Bucks two books – The Gentle Traditionalist and Cor Jesu Sacratissimum – have attracted rave reviews from the likes of Dr. Peter Kwasniewski, Charles Coulombe, and Joseph Shaw.  Both books have received almost unanimous 5 star reviews on Amazon.  A few people gave it 4 stars.

I would probably have to fall into this latter camp as well, for while I appreciate the work – especially the first half – and find its lighthearted approach refreshing in a traditional Catholic tome, I felt the author missed the point on two key subjects – the “evils” of capitalism and the pernicious influence of the United States –  and glossed over the liturgical revolution in the Church and its effects a bit much.  I am no longer entirely certain that “the Mass is the Mass is the Mass” irrespective of how disordered, abusive, or downright heretical it is.  Having said that, I also know there are much more beautiful, uplifting, and reverent means of offering the Novus Ordo.  Call me a bit agnostic on this subject.

First, the good parts.  The author very skillfully exposes that the ultimate struggle ongoing in the West (and, through the Anglosphere’s overpowering influence, the world) is not one of politics, not even one of culture, but one of religion.  He adroitly reveals what has been obvious to this blog for years, but which took me other years to discover on my own – the modern left-libertine cultural-political-social agenda movement is not, as it likes to present itself, simply the natural product of a scientific inquiry and rationalist thought, but is in fact a highly organized, tightly controlled religion, and one that is inveterately hostile to it’s longtime nemesis and competitor, the Catholic Christian Faith.  Even more, the author notes that this religion – which he calls the New Secular Religion, and I, more clumsily, refer to as sexular paganism, creates enormous power and room to maneuver for itself by steadfastly denying its religious basis, even though we see the religious nature of sexular paganism exposed more and more everyday, with heresies declared, anathemas issued, and (un)holy wars proclaimed.  As author Buck notes, because it is the religion of the shapers of mass popular culture – the media, academia, virtually all corporate titans, and the vast majority of politicians – secularism literally gets away with murder.  And mass murder at that, given the ongoing genocide of abortion and the rising genocide of the old and infirm in so-called euthanasia.

All this is brilliantly conveyed and powerfully argued – but in a folksy, approachable way missing in many books related to the traditional Catholic – or, I should say, Catholic – critique of both the culture and the Church.  In fact, I found myself wishing at times this book had been available in, say, 2010 or so – it would have saved me 3 years or more of figuring this out for myself!

There author also touches on elements of Catholic history that have been deliberately glossed over, if not ignored entirely, in the propaganda machines cum education-industrial complexes in the West, and in particular in the Anglosphere.  When For Greater Glory came out in 2012, I was shocked to find how few Catholics had ever heard of the Cristiada or know that there had been a violent, bloody persecution of Catholics persist for decades literally right next door to the US.  Similar elements of Catholic reaction to the ongoing sexular pagan revolution – the Carlists, the Spanish Civil War, the War in the Vendee, various Irish uprisings against protestant English rule – receive mention.

I also found absolutely fantastic the distinction the author makes between being gentle, and being “nice.” I would be remiss in not mentioning this detail – the spiritual adviser, the “gentle traditionalist” of the book, is very much just that. I do appreciate his gentleness and think this is a great example of how to do evangelization, even proselytization, in a way that is probably very well suited to this era of easily hurt feelings and mass emasculation.  Nevertheless, Buck notes that very much of what is wrong with the culture, especially with regard to decaying moral (and ecclesiastical) norms stems from a fear of not being “nice,” which means, ever causing anyone to feel uncomfortable or have their feelings hurt.  The Gentle Traditionalist would be a terror on today’s college campuses among generation snowflake.  The author also, at least tacitly, exposed much of what is wrong within the Church herself these past several decades: the triumph of the feminized “Church of Nice” over the Church of the Apostles, Fathers, and Doctors.

Even more importantly, the author rightly notes that the original source of the New Secular Religion, as he calls it, is the protestant heresy and revolt.  How the author can then turn around and declare that protestantism merely represents an “imperfect confession” of the Faith was a bit puzzling, for protestantism is the seed bed of literally everything sexular paganism represents – rejection of authority, exaltation of human “reason” above God’s revealed Truth, tolerance (and eventual promotion of) sexual license, a wholly distorted understanding of virtue and the the nature of right piety and devotion, etc., etc.  I felt there was some unfortunate influence of the post-VII ecumenical movement, here.  But, in truth, this was a brief and unfortunate departure from the book’s fairly comprehensive attack on protestantism as the ultimate root of the assault on Christendom by the New Secular Religion (I will say, however, that I think the author also glosses over grave problems in the Orthodox Churches, as well, and the growing number of heresies stemming from those bodies, but, given what’s been emanating from Rom in the past few years and decades, who am I to judge?).

More systemic problems throughout the book are the author’s obvious lack of understanding of the United States and its people, and his wholesale attacks on capitalism.  Now, we all have baggage from our past. I quite frequently wonder the degree to which my lifelong conservatism/right wing nuttiness may be influencing my conception of the Church and Church belief.  It is probable I color various understandings on these weighty matters with my own preferences.

The author was a longtime liberal, even, it seems, a devoted member of the unchurch of sexular paganism himself.  He is also a Britisher, and seems to derive much of his understanding of both (what is represented as) capitalism and the United States from incredibly biased British media coverage (the author also seems to believe that climate change is real, caused by humans, and is largely the fault of what he calls capitalism.  But ever seen the environmental record of communist/hard socialist states?).  His numerous snide comments regarding the United States and our supposed embrace of “capitalism run riot” aside  (I really don’t think the author has much experience of the United States or Americans, and fails to note hugely important distinctions, such as the massive socialist welfare state that has existed in the US for decades, or the fact that Americans on average, and Christian Americans in particular, are far, far more generous in giving to charity than any European populace, which points up a hugely important distinction: the fact that the US has a relatively smaller welfare state than most Eurozone countries does not mean that the US is a hard-hearted, un-Christian place.  It means that many Americans would rather do their charity themselves, rather than have the government do it for them, all the while keeping a huge proportion for itself and gravely injuring civil liberties given by God in the process), the main weakness with his arguments, to me, are his constant denunciations of capitalism, or what he believes capitalism is.

Now, again, taking into account differing life experiences and preferences, when I repeatedly encounter phrases like “wage slavery,” lifted directly from Das Kapital, I take a bit of exception.

Without going into too much detail, or becoming overly critical, I would simply say that the author shares a very prevalent bias, one that is even more common in Europe in the United States, when it comes to understanding capitalism.  Capitalism is simply, at its essence, the free exchange of goods and services among private individuals at agreed upon rates.  Capitalism was not invented by Adam Smith.  It is the default economic system that has virtually always arisen among groups of men at all stages of history, whether it be based on barter, gold coins, or paper dollars.  This system has sometimes, naturally, had elements of collectivism, and at other times and places, been much more individualistic.

What we have today in the United States, and even more so in Europe (and have had for decades, even a century or more in some nations) is a capitalist-socialist hybrid, highly influenced and controlled by government, with government often picking winners and losers.  Those winners tend to be established players who already have great wealth and influence, and who, almost unanimously, adhere to the New Secular Religion.  The distortion of the free market, and government’s almost total dominance over it in many nations, is a huge factor both in the spread of the New Secular Religion and in the inability to fight back against it. In fact, many Americans, at least, view a free market as being a vital means to resist the spread of the New Secular Religion, just as many other Americans view socialistic policies as being vital to its continuing spread.  In brief, I think the historical evidence and that from the present day both strongly indicate that the New Secular Religion, as Buck calls it, is inseparable from the socialist state, and the more socialist the state, the more secularist it is, at least in the West.  (I won’t even go into the numerous mentions of the US’ lack of a government-forced single payer health care scheme, which is presently causing thousands of murders a  year in Holland and has moved Britain to ration health care to a draconian decree – no heart surgery for you if you are fat or smoke too much!  I doubt the author has any idea how terribly health services have declined, and costs increased, even with the semi-single payer Obamacare.  It’s been an unmitigated disaster for the vast majority of Americans who constitute the middle class).

At any rate, suffice it to say that we disagree on this rather substantial point.  I would also say that, politically, the New Secular Religion has always been primarily promoted by the political and economic Left, and that it is no accident that both the communist governments that have taken root, and the more socialist governments of the world, have all been profoundly anti-Christian and especially anti-Catholic. Meanwhile, capitalism happily coexisted with Catholicism from its founding up until about 150 years ago.  Distributism, which the author seems to promote (but doesn’t really flesh out to any degree), is a nice dream, but I have grave concerns that it is not simply another economic utopian fantasy that would wind up getting a whole lot of people dead, of necessity, in order to implement it.  But I won’t rehash those arguments now.

I would simply rebut with this: no economic system has lifted more people out of poverty more quickly than capitalism, even in its limited, distorted, and government-dominated form of today.  Professor Jordan Peterson claims that more people (300 million) have been lifted out of poverty in the last decade than at any time in human history, and the rate is actually increasing, with 35-40 million growing out of poverty every year now.

All of this is not unimportant.  As I noted, to me, there is far, far greater correlation between the rise of totalitarianism, religious persecution, and the advance of the “New Secular Religion” or sexular paganism,  with socialism/Leftism than there is between these terrible features of the modern world and capitalism.

Not that there are not serious problems with both capitalism and the United States. There are, and I have discussed them at length, especially regarding the latter.  Modern capitalism, with government encouragement, too often descends into usury. And the US – along with every other similar nation – is fundamentally disordered in not having Jesus Christ as its visible Head and the Catholic Faith as its state religion.

I should regroup here, and say that even with these points of disagreement, I still liked the book, I recommend it (with some caution regarding the points above), and would give it 3 1/2 to 4 stars out of 5. [On reconsideration, I would say more like 3 stars.  The anti-capitalist rants are really quite extensive and actually form a key part of the book’s argumentation, while socialism/Leftism as economic factors in the decline of Christendom (and inextricably linked with the rise of the New Secular Religion) are passed by virtually without comment. I have a serious problem with that] I will almost certainly purchase the author’s other book Cor Iesu Sacratisissimum, since it it much longer and, I believe, is supposed to explain his understanding of ecclesiology, theology, and related matters in much greater depth.

I did particularly enjoy the excerpt from The Deer’s Cry, or St. Patrick’s Breastplate, the author included.  This is an ancient Irish prayer attributed to St. Patrick, and I found it quite moving and beautiful.  I hope to find time to post that tomorrow or sometime soon.

Overall, there is much more good in the book than anything I can find fault with.  Many other readers, apparently, did not find nearly so much to be concerned over as I did, or they were willing to let those things pass by.  That’s fine.  I’m interested to know if any of you have read the book, and, if so, what you thought of it.  I went on at length in some of my criticisms, but that’s really more an indication of my inability to unpack and criticique thoughts efficiently, than it is of the amount of book that is devoted to the subjects I find less perfectly cogitated.  Really, the vast majority of the book is quite solid, and I enjoyed it quite a bit.

Whew, longest post I’ve done in a while.  If you’re still here, you deserve a beer or a cigarette or a gold star…..something.  How about a nice glass of Skittlebrau?

Kind of an inside joke if you haven’t read the book.

 

Father Rodriguez on Mary’s Immaculate Heart July 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Father Rodriguez, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, mortification, Our Lady, priests, sanctity, thanksgiving, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Good Father Rodriguez with a brief rumination on Fatima and devotion to Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart.  From that Immaculate Heart we can especially learn virtues vital to salvation, especially purity, which in this day is so rarely maintained and so easily (and almost always irrevocably) lost.

Father shares how to practice devotion to the Immaculate heart, according to St. John Eudes: “keep in our heart the feelings which are in the heart of Mary the Mother of Jesus.”  The principle feelings in her heart are four: horror and abomination for sin, hatred and scorn for this corrupt world and everything pertaining to it, the lowest possible esteem for self, and profound esteem, respect, and love for all the things of God and His Church.  What excellent advice and direction for all seeking to grow in the interior life and the practice of virtue – and, I might add, how contrary to the “direction” we hear from Rome and most of the powerful episcopal leaders of the Church, including the exalted Cardinal Farrell, who I can assure you hasn’t spent 3 seconds in his life reading Eudes or any similar Saint of the interior life.

I won’t say anymore so I don’t steal all of Father’s thunder:

It would seem very natural and poetic to me should Fr. Rodriguez in some ways fulfill the legacy of Fr. Nicolas Gruner (RIP).  At any rate I pray his collaboration with the Fatima Center grows and grows.

End Catholic circular firing squads!