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Two Prayer Requests – Local Reader Needs Help, Support Trump Against Wiccan Curse February 23, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, Dallas Diocese, General Catholic, mortification, paganism, Revolution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sickness, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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Not me for a change.  Reader and longtime helper of this blog MJD is having severe breathing problems that impacting her ability to sleep, among other things.  Please pray that doctors may diagnose the cause, which has been elusive, and devise a more effective treatment.

More generally speaking, apparently there is an effort afoot by pagan witches worldwide to curse President Trump. The Nineveh 90 group sent out an e-mail to all the thousands who signed up for that effort of prayer and penance to spiritually support the president through prayers and spiritual warfare tomorrow, Feb. 24 2017, the day the curses/spells are supposed to be unleashed.  You are especially encouraged to pray the Chaplet of the Holy Face.  More from Fr. Richard Heilman:

TO ALL … ESPECIALLY NINEVEH 90 WARRIORS!!

This is Friday. It is also our fasting day. I am calling upon everyone to add the Chaplet of the Holy Face on Friday, and also add special prayers of protection and blessing upon President Trump. Offer up your sufferings for the President this Friday!

The Gospel on this day also has the explicit teaching of Christ against divorce and remarriage.

THIS IS A SPIRITUAL WARFARE DAY!!!

Thank you for your charitable generosity in these matters.  May God bless and reward you abundantly.

Announcement Post: Two Upcoming Events of Interest February 2, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Abortion, catachesis, contraception, Dallas Diocese, Eucharist, General Catholic, Latin Mass, Restoration, sexual depravity, sickness, Society, Tradition, Virtue.
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The Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation will be presenting a series of talks at Mater Dei Latin Mass Parish in Irving on Feb. 18-19.  I am not certain if the director of the Center, Mr. Hugh Owen, is giving the talks or not.  Details are below:

All are invited to attend a seminar presented by the Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation on Creation and Evolution.

This will be a six part presentation on the philosophy, theology, and science behind creation and evolution.

 

The seminar is free, but a free will offering will be taken up to help cover the cost of this event.

 

Dinner will be served at 5pm on Saturday with a

suggested donation of $5 for adults; $2-3 per child.

Where: Mater Dei Parish Hall

When: (part 1) Saturday, Feb. 18th: 5-8/9pm

            (part 2) Sunday,  Feb. 19th: 2-5pm

BTW, in addition to overnight Adoration (TLM at 8p, Adoration starts after, ends before 8a Mass on Saturday) on the FIRST FRIDAY of each month, Mater Dei is experimenting with having Adoration from 1-5p on every Friday.  If attendance is sufficient to insure the Blessed Sacrament is never left unattended, it will become a regular thing.

The other upcoming local event is a series of protests to de-fund Planned Baby-Butchery at a couple of locations in the Diocese, to be held from 9-11a at Feb 11.  The principle one, to me, is at the baby-murder super center in South Dallas:

Dallas

Planned Parenthood – South Dallas Surgical Health Services Center
7989 W Virginia Dr, Dallas, TX 75237 (Map & Directions)
Time: 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. on February 11

The other protest is in Plano:

Plano

Planned Parenthood – Plano Health Center
600 N Central Expy, Plano, TX 75074 (Map & Directions)
Time: 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on February 11
Note: This event will consist of a prayer vigil. Street parking is available next to Fry’s Electronics on Executive Drive.

I plan to be at the protest in South Dallas.  Maybe I will see some of you there.

Confession is A Most Vital Sacrament in this Age of Mass Sin and Grievous Error January 30, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Admin, Basics, Dallas Diocese, different religion, episcopate, General Catholic, priests, Sacraments, self-serving, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church.
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A few weeks ago, I  did a post announcing Cardinal Burke coming to the Diocese of Dallas to offer Mass on 01/22.  I received some hot criticism of this post, offline.  Those upset over the post were either involved in bringing Cardinal Burke in, or were particular admirers of the pastor of the parish that hosted him.

So, what is at issue in this little local imbroglio?  Confession, and whether I was unfairly harsh towards a local priest my local correspondents feel is very good.  Admittedly, I was pointedly critical in a post that perhaps should have been both happier and more bland, simply announcing the good Cardinal’s upcoming arrival and congratulating those who arranged for his visit (both were in the post, along with some other more critical thoughts).

Now, everyone’s definition of good is relative.  My definition of a good priest in these days starts with offering the TLM, or at least the Novus Ordo in Latin, or having serious aspirations to do either but being frustrated by episcopal obstinance/malfeasance.  Frankly, a handful of exceptions aside, all the extraordinary priests I know are members of explicitly traditional orders.

Taking Confession extremely seriously is requirement #2.  This is what separates the men from the boys in my mind.  Confession is the great ignored, even inconvenient Sacrament of our time.  It is inconvenient because it is a standing rebuke to much of the new theology and ecclesiology that has been imposed on the Church in the past several decades, beliefs that say that whether one is Catholic or not doesn’t count for much, that basically all men are saved, that virtually no one ever commits a mortal sin, etc.  These kinds of beliefs are the primary reason why Confession is so little available.

There used to be a sort of rule of thumb in the Church, back in those dark unreconstructed manualist days before the “sainted” Council, that for every hour of Mass, there should be at least an equal number of hours of Confession.  In fact, most pre-conciliar parishes had priests (plural) in the Confessional before, during, and after virtually every Mass, along with other set times.  This was when the Church, and the souls within, took things like sin and Grace and damnation and redemption very seriously.

But today, in this Diocese as in almost every other, Confession is limited to perhaps an hour a week, if one is lucky, or “by appointment only,” if one is not.  This in spite of the fact that our former Bishop, now Cardinal, Kevin Farrell, repeatedly (and a bit uncharacteristically) exhorted his priests and especially pastors to have more REGULAR hours of Confession.  Many pastors responded to these exhortations, by adding one more hour weekly to the one they already had (such generosity!), while some did not. A few relative heroes did even more, adding maybe 2 or 3 hours more Confession, and staffing those hours with more than one priest.

In the dearth of Confession, the tyranny is in the numbers.  If there is only one priest hearing confessions for one hour a week, and each soul has only 3 minutes with the confessor and there are no gaps in people in the confessional, that one priest can hear 20 confessions a week or 1040  a year.  That may sound like quite a lot, but when you have numerous parishes with 7,000, 8,000, 10,000 souls ostensibly belonging, one can instantly see the problem.  Of course, the reality is different.  What tends to happen is that the same handful of relatively serious souls go to Confession with at least some regularity, while the great mass never go at all.

Couple this with what is known of Catholic belief, even among self-described regular Mass attendees, and the crisis grows into stark relief.  The vast majority of Catholics, regular Mass-goers or not, find nothing immoral in contraceptive use or fornication.  A near majority even think abortion is morally permissible in at least some cases. The large majority are fine with pseudo-sodo-marriage and think divorce and remarriage are perfectly acceptable.  The vast majority believe the Blessed Sacrament to be nothing more than a symbol.  The former, if engaged in personally, constitute grave sins requiring sacramental Confession before the Blessed Sacrament is received (recent emanations from Rome notwithstanding).  The latter places one outside the community of the faithful; reception of the Blessed Sacrament in this state constitutes the horrible sin of sacrilege and again immediate recourse to Confession is vitally necessary.

Taken together, what we have in the Church today is a great mass of people regularly receiving the Blessed Sacrament in a state that St. Paul decried perfectly in 1 Corinthians 11:27-29 (a bit of Scripture infamously and deliberately excluded from the readings of the Novus Ordo Mass), and with little to no means to correct this dire condition.  Adding to that, the very lack of Confession time communicates to the faithful that this is something that isn’t to be taken very seriously.  Writ large, this is very close to what Pope Saint John Paul II decried as the “fundamental option,” the idea that God is infinitely loving (and apparently no longer just) and that virtually no one, if anyone (short of evil right wingers like me) is damned.  That this is utterly contrary to our Blessed Lord’s clear Word as revealed repeatedly in Sacred Scripture and the guidance of vast numbers of Saints and Fathers seems to count for very little these days.  Confession remains generally  unavailable.

Not only that, but we have numerous warnings from the Blessed Mother and many of these same Saints about the number of souls condemned to hell.  While such warnings are widely viewed as quaint relics from a benighted age to most priests and prelates in the Church today, they have been so numerous, so consistent, and so emphatic that to doubt or deny them is a fool’s errand. I certainly do not.  I take these warnings deadly seriously, as I take the biblical types that reveal to us the very small number of the elect, and the great number of the damned.

So, yes, I take Confession very seriously, and its lack of availability as one of the greatest scandals afflicting the Church today.  In fact, lack of Confession and unwillingness to take its vital necessity seriously constitute very large elements of the present crisis in the Faith.  Thus, the great number of souls falling to hell like so many snowflakes, to quote Our Lady of Fatima.

Several years ago, at the time when former Bishop Farrell was making his exhortations, I did a post that summarized the availability of Confession in the Diocese. I checked most every parish.  Some had zero regular hours for Confession.  Most had one.  A few had two.  A tiny handful had somewhat more.  Two parishes stood out as placing a great (or, one might say, adequate) emphasis on Confession.  I’m sure locals know which two those are (Mater Dei, and St. William in Greenville).

So, even as someone who has admitted mistakes and made public apologies in the past, I don’t feel particularly bad about the post announcing +Burke’s visit and Mass.  I didn’t criticize Cardinal Burke in the slightest (in fact I praised him quite a bit), all my critical comments were directed towards confession and the probability, the virtual certitude, that, on a daily basis, souls with unconfessed mortal sins receive the Blessed Sacrament – and the role the diminution of the importance of Confession plays in that.  Perhaps I erred in prudence in combining critical commentary in an announcement post for a happy event.  Perhaps I could have chosen more artful phrases. But if I erred in charity, it was for the souls of those in gravest risk of eternal damnation, preferring their eternal destiny over more human concerns like the feelings of my correspondents or the pastor of the parish I criticized.  Of course, even that may be argued as simply misplaced zeal, but that was my intent, nonetheless.

PS – There were claims I had erred in stating Mary Immaculate – the parish that hosted Cardinal Burke – had only one hour of Confession a week.  That was all that was listed on their website (in addition to “by appointment”). I also perused a few bulletins.  I saw no other times listed.  But apparently, there is a monthly meeting/confab called “Arise” (not entirely unproblematic in its own right) where priests hear Confession.  I have no details as to how many priests are present, or for how long Confession is available.  Whether this constitutes “regular” Confession or not is arguable.  But I thought I’d include this only substantive rebuttal of my arguments for completeness’ sake.

I certainly welcome your comments and appraisal of the matter, if you have any.  Thank you.

 

 

The Atrocious Conditions Inside the Southwestern Abortuary January 20, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Abortion, asshatery, contraception, Dallas Diocese, disaster, error, foolishness, General Catholic, horror, It's all about the $$$, rank stupidity, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sexual depravity, sickness, Society.
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I have prayed outside so-called “Southwestern Women’s Surgery Center” many times. This is the abortion mill – though butcher shop might be a more apt description – operated by former baptist minister and long time abortion fanatic Curtis Boyd.  A woman probably undergoing an abortion apparently had a medical emergency at Boyd’s shop recently.  Which is hardly surprising, considering the atrocious conditions found inside, as detailed in a 22 page report listing health and safety violations at the abortion mill.  Lots of very revealing, if terrifying, detail below:

An ambulance was called to Southwestern Women’s Surgery Center in Dallas, Texas, on January 12, 2017, to aid a woman who was removed from the abortion facility in a wheel chair prior to being loaded into the ambulance.

According to radio communications obtained by Operation Rescue, an ambulance was dispatched to the abortion facility at 12:21 pm. The recording indicated that the woman in need of emergency care was having difficulty breathing.

Southwestern Women’s Surgery Center (SWSC) is considered a high-volume abortion facility, conducting approximately 50 surgical abortions per day. It is owned and operated by aging abortionist Curtis Boyd, who turns 80 in March and is said to still conduct surgical abortions there………

……..

However, the most recent inspection report available for SWSC, dated November 24, 2015, tells a different story about horrific conditions women have been subjected to there.

Within the 22 pages of violations were found a litany of problems, including untrained staff, unsanitary conditions, failure to maintain the sterility of surgical instruments, and failure to follow up with women who were given abortion drugs, to name a few.

However, perhaps the most shocking finding was related to SWSC’s storage and disposal of contaminated waste and aborted baby remains.

Inspectors found the Biohazard Room packed “floor to ceiling” with bags of soiled linens and biohazard boxes. There was a refrigerator that contained aborted baby remains, but the room was so junky, that the inspector could not access that refrigerator.

On the second day of the inspection, bags of dirty linens were found crammed into nearly every available space, including the patient recovery room. Again, access to the refrigerator storing aborted baby remains was not possible due to the obstructions, which the staff never bothered to remove.

If the storage refrigerator could not be accessed, one can only wonder how the remains from the day’s abortions could possibly be refrigerated, and how it was possible for a disposal firm to collect the refrigerated remains.

Unfortunately, SWSC isn’t unique when it comes to badly failing health and safety inspections. The most recent inspection reports available for each abortion facility in Texas were obtained by Operation Rescue. They showed 16 out of 17 abortion facilities failed their inspections and were cited for a wide range of violations.

Of course, with the courts overturning the very sensible restrictions the State of Texas had placed on abortion mills, requiring them to meet minimum health and safety standards, the standards against which abortion mills are judged are much less stringent than they should be.  When that Texas law – HB2 – was passed, the vast majority of the state’s mills closed.  They were unable to make a fat profit while meeting minimum health and safety standards.  Now that the law has been overturned by the unelected black robed oligarchy that rules this country, mills are free to conduct their business amidst atrocious, horrifying conditions.

And why wouldn’t they? Individuals dedicated to the wholesale slaughter of perfectly innocent children are unlikely to have any scruples over such a trivial thing as health code violations.  That is why state health code enforcement against abortion mills must be rigorous and severe.  But it’s not.  In fact, it’s the opposite, mills are constantly allowed to continue operating even with numerous ongoing, unremediated violations.  The whole thing reeks of collusion, and the women seeking abortions are the ones who ultimately pay the bill.

Pro-aborts love to use scare-tactics regarding sensible abortion restrictions, claiming that the day of the back-alley butcher and coat-hanger abortion will return en masse if mills are required to maintain even the slightest standards.  But doesn’t that reveal a great deal about just who populates the abortion industry, and the kinds of depths they are ever-ready to stoop to in their unquenchable pursuit of profit?

That is to say, the supposed “abortion doctor” of today is in reality the very same as the “back alley butcher” of yesterday, he’s’ just hung a shingle and set up shop in a filthy, unkempt facility.  Thus, the Left’s supposed sacrosanct concern over “women’s health.”  What a crock.  Like everything else, it’s a monstrous, diabolical lie.

Good Local News – Another Catholic Homeschool Co-Op Starts This Year January 16, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Dallas Diocese, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, North Deanery, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Society, true leadership, Virtue.
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A hearty thanks go out to Fr. Cliff Smith, pastor of St. Mark parish in Plano, for making this new Catholic homeschool Coop a reality.  Starting next fall, St. Mark in Plano will host the area’s second Catholic homeschool cooperative for older students.  Currently there is one at Mater Dei that meets on Thursdays and is intended primarily for high school students, this new one will meet on Tuesdays and be for grades 7-12.  A few details below:

Several of our group members met with St. Mark the
Evangelist Catholic Church in Plano this week, and they are welcoming us to start a Catholic homeschool co-op next school year to serve students in 7th grade through high school. It has been named the Collin County Catholic Co-op (C4).

We will be meeting in the Smyth Pastoral Center on Tuesdays.
The day will start with morning Mass at 8:30am and have classes following after Mass through the afternoon.

Well that is good news.  As I’m sure almost any homeschooling parents can relate, as kids enter middle and high school teaching all the advanced and complex subjects can be quite taxing.  Cooperatives like this help spread the burden by hiring teachers for these subjects. Without them, a mom might be faced with simultaneously teaching 10 or more high school subjects on her own – a daunting task. Coops also provide a great outlet for kids to meet other kids being raised by parents of good will.

Fr. Smith has long been very supportive of homeschoolers and deserves recognition for that.  He is taking his support a step further by enabling this new co-op to use parish facilities.  I’m sure there will be many local Catholics thankful for his generosity.  Anything that encourages the spread and execution of homeschooling is much appreciated.  I pray even more parents in the North Dallas area will embrace this wonderful way of raising children with this latest opportunity.

Cardinal Burke Offering Mass of Reparation in Dallas 01/22 January 12, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Abortion, awesomeness, contraception, Dallas Diocese, different religion, Eucharist, General Catholic, priests, Sacraments, Society, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Virtue.
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It would be awesome if it were at a TLM Mass – which would of course mean Mater Dei – but then again, I wasn’t one of those who put in what I am quite certain was most significant effort in inviting Burke and making arrangements for his travel, etc.  So good for the folks in the “Catholic Action for Faith and Family” who pulled this off.  The Mass is at 10:30am at Mary Immaculate Parish in Farmers Branch.  This is a Mass of Reparation for the sin of abortion, marking of course yet another sad anniversary of this nation’s genocide against it’s own young.

I don’t plan on assisting at this Mass, as grateful as I am for Cardinal Burke’s relative orthodoxy and his stand against the increasingly unhinged and egregious errors and abuses emanating from the pontificate of Francis.  I will note in passing that Mary Immaculate is one of a number of parishes in this diocese with only one hour of Confession a week.  I do pray that Cardinal Burke’s presence and example encourage a much more generous attitude on the part of Fr. Michael Forge and Daniel Rendon to this most vital of Sacraments.  It is a metaphysical certitude that there are numerous souls receiving Communion weekly and even daily at Mary Immaculate in a state of mortal sin, and who have not availed themselves of Confession in years if not decades.  And why should they, when it is evidently of such low priority to those with the solemn duty to pastor their souls to Heaven?

I am a bit reticent to introduce this rant into a post on what is really a different subject and should be a happy occasion, but I must wonder how many souls who may assist at what will surely be a glorious event in the life of this parish (and a significant statement on the part of the clergy in hosting Burke) do not have unconfessed involvement in the deliberately willed termination of perfectly innocent life on their conscience, and who will receive the Blessed Sacrament, in an act of terrible sacrilege, without a second thought?  I’d be willing to bet it’s more than a handful.

Please God that I am wrong, but I strongly suspect I am not.

A Very Positive Appraisal of Dallas’ New Bishop Edward Burns    January 9, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Abortion, awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, General Catholic, Latin Mass, Liturgy, priests, Society, true leadership.
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One reason I’ve been behind the curve with regard to soon-to-be Dallas Bishop Edward Burns is because I was completely offline and out of town in North Carolina when the announcement was made. I missed out on a great deal of coverage, also, because I am not on social media. So, I was very glad to receive an appraisal from a local person who happened to have some interaction with Edward Burns on the day the announcement of his appointment as Dallas’ next bishop was made, essentially the only day he has been in the Dallas Diocese so far.

This individual was very impressed.  They indicated Bishop-elect Burns is very prayerful.  In fact, in spite of having an extremely busy day of travel, introductions, and press conferences/media interaction, he insisted on having a Holy Hour the night of the announcement.  Some folks thought, it’s too late, it’s been a long day, but Bishop-elect Burns was determined to have a Holy Hour of prayer for thanksgiving and for Grace for his upcoming role, and so he had one.  The impression my contact gained of Bishop-elect Burns is that he is a prayerful man, something that even I have been well aware was not an exactly overwhelming characteristic of either of his predecessors.

Bishop-elect Burns also showed a welcome pastoral touch.  Even though he met hundreds of people on the day of his introduction to the Diocese, at the end of the day he thanked many involved by name.  He had involved conversations with many local Catholics, from diocesan staff to lay people who had hurried to the presser to meet him, and all came away very impressed.  He seemed to be happy to make time for local Catholics, to hear their views and any concerns they might have, and did not seem to be in a hurry to get away to more pressing engagements.  That’s again a bit of a change from what has been the experience of local Catholics in recent years.  I know I am far from the only involved local Catholic who found Bishop Farrell a man who was essentially impossible for most laity to reach, even well-connected, involved ones who had serious business to discuss.

It’s too soon to tell where Bishop-elect Burns lands on the matter of the Liturgy and Doctrine, but my contact is very hopeful there, too.  I did get further feedback from local pro-life leaders that they are very excited and expect good things from Burns.  Their brief introductions apparently gave them substantial hope for even more diocesan support of local pro-life, anti-abortion efforts.

Another hopeful sign is this: a local priest who has longed for years to offer Mass Ad Orientem is again doing so.  This priest had introduced Ad Orientem at Mass in 2008, intending the change to be permanent, but he was apparently forced to desist after only a few weeks.  You guys are well-informed readers, you can do the math from there.  I know this priest very well and dearly love him, and am so glad he is again able to offer Mass facing the tabernacle as has been the default practice in the Church for 15 or 16 centuries.

Well, praise God, it looks like Dallas will have a bishop that is, if not a hero of orthodox doctrine, at least approachable, possessed of a solid prayer life, and seems to bend at least somewhat conservative.  I know there are a few indications that have given some folks pause, but for now I will remain hopefully optimistic and give our new Bishop-elect Burns the benefit of the doubt, as he rightfully deserves.  Never a Pollyanna, I’ll certainly be watching his actions with interest and will call things as I see them, but until then, I’ll take these positive assessments from people I know and pray they play out into reality over the next few years.

People often tend to want to give the newcomer, especially an authority figure, the benefit of the doubt, until evidence proves out the contrary, but I think there is a reasonable expectation of hope here.

Prayer Request and Thanks January 5, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, catachesis, Dallas Diocese, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Holy suffering, reading, sadness, Tradition, Virtue.
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A couple of “housekeeping” items, if you will – please pray for A, wife of longtime reader “ADG,” who gave birth to their 9th child a couple of months ago and shortly after developed some serious medical conditions.  She is still recovering and her health remains under 100%.  If you could please add her to your prayers, I know it would be greatly appreciated.

The thanks comes from me, to those who sent me items from my Amazon wishlist and/or a gift certificate.  I thank you very much and feel quite humbled by your generosity.  I have just come across some really good new sources of Catholic catechesis and have added a number of items to my wishlist.  If any feel called to buy something on there for me, all will be greatly appreciated.  Pretty much everything on the list is directly blog related, and if you do send me something, you can rest assured any good material I draw from it will show up on this blog at one time or other.

One of those new items of catechesis is The Catechism in Examples, a five volume set produced by Fr. D. Chisholm and published over 100 years ago in Britain.  Reader SL sent me a link to this massive tome (over 2000 pages!) and it looks really powerful.  Many find the 1990s Catechism painfully dry, and sometimes questionable doctrinally.  I tend to imagine the doctrine in this 100 year old set of volumes will be unimpeachable, while its format is easier to read since it gives concrete examples for each point of doctrine discussed, rather than relaying them in a purely theological way.  The Catechism in Examples is also available at The Internet Archive for free if you happen to read books online.

 

So, While I Was Away, Dallas Got a New Bishop January 4, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, General Catholic, history, huh?, priests, secularism, Society.
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Edward Burns from, of all places, Juneau, AK, was named to replace departed <giggle> Cardinal <snort> Farrell about three weeks ago, while I was in beautiful but cold North Carolina.  This is a real under-the-radar kind of appointment.  Burns is not as young as I feared (59, meaning Dallas won’t be saddled with one man, great or disastrous, for thirty years, like Albany and Rochester have been), and he’s led a fairly low profile heretofore.  I’m not entirely certain, but there’s a good possibility that his former Diocese, Juneau, is the smallest in the nation.  Heck, it’s 6000 Catholics are smaller than probably 2/3 of the parishes in this diocese.

I’ll admit this appointment happened a great deal sooner than I thought.  Bishop Cardinal Farrell had said, before departing, that a replacement would be named within 2-3 months.  I scoffed at that, since other dioceses have waited 18-24 months to get replacements, but he was obviously better informed than I: the replacement was named just over 3 months after Farrell departed for his new sinecure in Rome.

New Bishop Burns hails originally from Pittsburgh, and got some love from Pope JPII (via Ratzinger) in being appointed one of the co-chairman of the apostolic investigation into the (deliberately engineered) vocations crisis in the US, and later was appointed to the Vatican review of US seminaries.  After that, however, he was sent back to Pittsburgh to the post he had held before he had been elevated to the USCCB in 1999, as rector of the diocesan seminary in Pittsburgh.  After an additional year in that role was apparently sufficient purgatory and he was then consecrated Bishop of Juneau by Benedict XVI in early 2009.  I don’t know if these moves signify a rising or falling star or are simply the vagaries of Church assignments for a man being groomed for the episcopate.  Beats me.

The Diocese of Pittsburgh under Bishop David Zubik is generally seen to be somewhat on the conservative side, I think, at least relatively speaking by 201X American standards.  What that means for our new Bishop Burns in Dallas is uncertain.  This guy does not have much of a paper trail, though he has been fairly reliably pro-life, at least in a few public pronouncements.  He doesn’t seem to be a screaming liberal, but I could be fooled.

I’m also uncertain what Burn’s appointment means for the Diocese.  It does seem something of a step down, from receiving the consummate insider (and clearly a man on the rise) in Farrell, who had been a protege of the notorious but highly influential Cardinal McCarrick, a big player in the politically important Archdiocese of Washington, DC, and a deeply committed USCCB apparatchik, to this guy, wonderful though he may be (or may not be) from the Diocese of North Pole.  Does that say something about how Dallas is perceived within the Church? Under Farrell, Dallas went from being something of a backwater with a scandalous recent past (the boy-rape scandals and decadent seminary situation being Farrell’s two biggest repair priorities in office) to being a destination, from being a place that received bishops from elsewhere to one that exported many into leadership positions in nearby dioceses.  Or is it a situation where a diocese in crisis merited an admittedly sharp administrator (if hardly an inspiring, doctrinally strong shepherd), and now that the crisis is supposedly past (though things continue to be buried), someone of a lower profile could be named as replacement?  I do not say any of this as a criticism of Burns, it’s simply comparing the very disparate past histories of two different men.

Some local pro-life folks have apparently met with Bishop-elect Burns and came away heartened.  So maybe he’ll be awesome.  My guess is that very little will change, practically speaking.  There isn’t anything in his background, that I have found, that indicates he might have a innate hostility towards Tradition, over and above what most men formed in his time and place have.  Of course, it’s difficult to say, most of this is just speculation off of a few thread of evidence.  If you have found documentation that indicates reasons for concern or elation, please share them.  My research has been limited to an afternoon and an evening during the break.  I admit I am mostly just spitballing in this post.

One thing that has changed, and I imagine this was planned under Farrell, is that the local pro-life Mass and march will be split into two days, and the march will be little more than a short stroll from the convention center to an empty parking lot on deserted, weekend downtown streets (the last bit being per usual, unfortunately).  This isn’t a major change, formerly held on one day with a Mass and a mile or so long march through downtown Dallas, the local pro-life March has, over the years, degenerated into a self-congratulatory spectacle garnering precious little media coverage and accomplishing mostly mutual back-patting. I don’t criticize those who participate, it’s certainly fine to get some reinforcement for one’s pro-life beliefs, but the March reaches basically no one who is not already converted and I don’t think it accomplishes a great deal in the defense of life in any concrete sense. As such, we’re going to just pray/counsel outside a mill, instead of participating in the March.  Unfortunately, in the wake of the court’s overturning of Texas HB2, mills that had closed down due to the bill are re-opening, like the notorious Northpark mill which is nearly complete.

Trump to DHS: Start Preparations to Build Wall January 4, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, General Catholic, Immigration, It's all about the $$$, Restoration, scandals, self-serving, Society, Victory.
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Wellity wellity wellity – is this one prominent campaign promise that might come true?  What might such a wall look like?  What kind of overwatch would it have?  Guard towers every X meters, or regular patrols, or an abundance of sensors, or all of the above, or?  If we can find three camel herding Taliban in 50,000 square kilometers of mountain terrain with airborne drones, can we not find most all the 2-3 million illegals who cross the border every year?

Do you think it will really happen?  I imagine the wall would have to be completed within his term(s) of office, because I don’t see many replacements that would finish it.  Can it be done?  How much will it help? (my guess – if built right and patrolled properly, it will cut illegal immigration 90+%, which is why the business/political elite hates the idea so much):

A memo from the Department of Homeland Security, which was recently reviewed by Reuters, suggest that the Trump administration plans to hit the ground running on the construction of that U.S.-Mexico border wall when they move into the White House later this month.  The memo apparently summarized a meeting held between DHS officials and Trump’s transition team on December 5th in which requests were made for an assessment of “all assets available for border wall and barrier construction.” [Back in the 80s, the South Africans had flat bed trucks rigged with gear that could spit out hundreds of feet of triple concertina wire in seconds. The truck just drove along at a fair pace while the wire spat out the back.  Great way to isolate a fair sized locality very quickly. A southern border wall could be built incrementally, starting with a quick and dirty version while a more permanent one is built.  Even triple concertina will slow people down, a lot.]

In a wide-ranging request for documents and analysis, President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team asked the Department of Homeland Security last month to assess all assets available for border wall and barrier construction.

The requests were made in a Dec. 5 meeting between Trump’s transition team and Department of Homeland Security officials, according to an internal agency memo reviewed by Reuters. The document offers a glimpse into the president-elect’s strategy for securing the U.S. borders and reversing polices put in place by the Obama administration. [The Left will try to tie this up in the courts]

The Trump transition team also allegedly took aim at Obama’s executive actions, requesting “copies of every executive order and directive sent to immigration agents since Obama took office in 2009.” 

The transition team also asked for copies of every executive order and directive sent to immigration agents since Obama took office in 2009, according to the memo summarizing the meeting.

Trump has said he intends to undo Obama’s executive actions on immigration, including a 2012 order to allow children brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents to remain in the country on temporary authorizations that allow them to attend college and work. [the so-called “dreamers.”]

The program, known as DACA, collected information including participants’ addresses that could theoretically be used to locate and deport them if the policy is reversed.

I’m agnostic on what happens to those millions currently in the country illegally once a wall gets built, or the immigration system is otherwise contained and stabilized at much lower, more easily integrated numbers.  I would actually prioritize expatriation of muslims, especially those with any even remotely radical or criminal connections, far ahead of deporting Hispanics.  Once the immigration rate is stabilized, it may be found that most Hispanics currently here illegally may remain and begin a path to normalized citizenship (save for those with criminal records and with a history of welfare abuse).  There are many reasonable avenues to pursue, once the crisis is past and we can calmly and rationally consider what to do with those already here.

But it’s almost impossible to act wisely while in the midst of such a terrific crisis as we are faced with a practically non-existent southern border.  It’s also difficult to act wisely when one political party seeks to gain a permanent majority by importing reliable voters to the detriment to much of the existing native population.  There are myriad reasons why a wall is necessary and prudent, in spite of any “offense” building such might seem to commit against charity.  Charity does have its bounds, especially in the material sense.  It is not required to absolutely impoverish oneself for the improvement of another, and that could well be what this nation faces on this current path of essentially unconstrained immigration.

One can only imagine the wailing and gnashing of teeth that will emanate from the USCCB (and this diocese?) should one brick get laid on that wall.  We rarely hear how those imported Catholics (half of which will be gone from the Church within 10 years or less) are exploited and abused by unscrupulous employers due to their precarious legal status.