jump to navigation

Wonderful Developments, Liturgical and Otherwise, at St. Mark Parish in Plano January 31, 2020

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, Eucharist, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, North Deanery, priests, Restoration, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership.
34 comments

He lives!  Sorry for the long absence.  I even missed the 10th anniversary of the blog by a month and a half.

But something important has come up.

I have known the young pastor of St. Mark parish in Plano, Texas, since he was a newly ordained priest.  We were always gratified to see him wearing the occasional cassock and frequent Roman chasuble.  He even wore black at funeral Masses.  I figured we could expect great things from him.

This good priest, Fr. Marco Rangel, had some other assignments in the intervening 10 or so  years, but last year he was assigned as the pastor of St. Mark in Plano.  He has made a number of changes that I believe almost all devout Catholics will find most positive.

First, St. Mark, god bless it and whatever its merits, I don’t think has ever been anyone’s idea of a brilliant architectural and artistic achievement.  A sunken sanctuary with stadium seating and bare concrete and stucco walls, it at least did have one very large stained glass window, and a nice, traditional crucifix (which the former pastor, Fr. Cliff Smith, is to be thanked for fighting for.  He caught surprising flak for replacing the touchdown Jesus, Christ rising on the cross “crucifix” with a far more tasteful,a nd I would say, accurate and Catholic one).  However, Fr. Rangel has made a number of changes, which you can see below.  Most photos were taken during Christmas, which of course includes additional decorations, but most all the paintings and statuary are new.  The angels kneeling in adoration next to the tabernacle are definitely new, and so welcome, as is the Benedictine arrangement on the altar.

The before:

Some initial changes:  Small but noticeable:

The full monte:

Changes to the Eucharistic adoration chapel:

I’m amazed at the improvements these changes have made.  Some – like the addition of the statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe – were made under Father Smith, but most have been made under Father Rangel.

Next, there are major liturgical improvements underway.  Father Rangel offered Mass partially in Latin during Advent and on Christmas, and will do so again during Lenten Sunday Masses.  This included the propers and Gloria in Latin as appropriate, as well as organ music and Gregorian chant.  Father Rangel intends to continue adding more and more reverent aspects to the Liturgy and is open to even becoming bi-ritual, should interest warrant such a move.

And that’s one of the purposes of this post, not only to apprise of these positive developments, and prove I am still alive, but also to ask readers here in the Diocese of Dallas to send a letter of support to Bishop Burns for authentic, orthodox liturgical improvements, the Traditional Latin Mass, and Father Rangel in particular.  Whether  you attend St. Mark or not, if you desire to see liturgy more in keeping with the constant belief and practice of the Church, this is a great opportunity to show both your interest and your support for a local priest who is taking large steps in that direction.  Of course, Father Rangel has encountered a great deal of resistance, so he could use all the support he can get.  This kind of support can be vital in determining how a bishop may respond to these kinds of initiatives made on the part of pastors. I thus implore all local readers, and even interested non-local ones (you should indicate whether or not you reside in the Diocese), to contact both Bishop Burns and Father Rangel.  I provide some form letters below, which you are free to use.  It is quite a risk for a priest to make changes like this, and at this pace.  Father Rangel has not been pastor at St. Mark for even a year, yet, I do not believe.

This also ties in with changes in catechesis and sacramental preparation at St. Mark, which is my final point.  Father Rangel is working to revamp the materials used in these vital areas, to be in accord with timeless, unchanging Church teaching which goes back to the Apostolic Deposit of Faith, and not just the current theological experimentations presently in vogue.

Letters should be sent to:

Bishop Edward Burns
Catholic Diocese of Dallas
3725 Blackburn St.
Dallas, TX, 75219

A sample letter is included below, just as an idea.  Feel free to compose your own:

Dear Bishop Burns –

Greetings in Christ! I have been apprised of the very positive liturgical, architectural, and catechetical improvements made by Father Marco Rangel of St. Mark parish in Plano, Texas, and I am writing to indicate my wholehearted support for these efforts.  Father Rangel is moving the liturgy at St. Mark to be very reverent and to offer great glory and honor to God.  His artistic and liturgical changes are in keeping with the great patrimony of our Holy Mother Church, and unite our worship with that of millions of Catholics through years past.  His changes incorporating more Latin, Gregorian chant, and great reverence for the Most Blessed Sacrament are all very edifying and are bringing great benefit to many souls.  We implore your eminence to support Father Rangel in this new direction for St. Mark.

I would also like to include in this letter a request for regular Traditional Latin Masses (TLM) in the north deanery of the Diocese of Dallas, most particularly in the Plano/Richardson area.  At this point, St. Mark and Father Marco Rangel would appear to be the most suited for offering this ancient and beautiful form of the Mass, but St. Joseph in Richardson may also be a strong candidate.

We thank you for your continued leadership of this diocese, and  for the many blessings and benefits this leadership has brought.  We pray your leadership, and that of good priests like Father Rangel, will continue to bring glory to God and aid in the sanctification of all the souls in  the Diocese of Dallas.

God bless and keep you,

Name

In all likelihood it will be Bishop Kelly that reads these and responds, but the message will hopefully get through to Bishop Burns.

I also implore you to send letters of support and thanks to Father Rangel at St. Mark.  He can be reached at:

(Pastor) Father Marco Rangel
St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church
1105 West 15th Street
Plano, TX 75075

Another sample:

Dear Father Rangel –

Greetings in Christ!  I have learned of late that you are in the process of making numerous liturgical, artistic, and catechetical improvements to St. Mark.  May God reward you!  This is such a happy and blessed development, and will surely bring enormous fruit to souls.   I support you in your efforts to bring more  reverence to the Mass and to bring St. Mark’s liturgical, artistic, and catechetical practice more in union with the great patrimony of our Holy Mother Church.  I am so grateful that some of the fruit of the “reform of the reform” is beginning to blossom in Plano.

I would also like to indicate my interest in having a regular Traditional Latin Mass (TLM) at St. Mark.  I reside in the Diocese of Dallas/North Dallas/Collin County area and would be overjoyed to have a TLM closer to my home and/or place of business, particularly at St. Mark.  If you are assessing the level of interest in this form of the Mass in the Plano area, please be assured of mine, and that of my family.

May God continue to bless and support your apostolate in every way,

Name

Father Rangel can also be reached at pastor@stmarkplano.org.

If at least 12 of you do not contact Father Rangel with support, I’ll never post again.   Like that’ll be any different!

Highlight from First Pontifical High Mass in Dallas Diocese in over 50 Years October 24, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
comments closed

Probably quite well over.  I don’t know when Bishop Gorman offered the last Pontifical High Mass, but it had to be before 1969.

The Mass was wonderful.  I had never assisted at one before, and didn’t know quite what to expect, but it was essentially a Solemn High Mass with additional elements according the presence of a bishop.  It lasted about 2 1/2 hours including the introductory processing in of Bishop Schneider and the additional prayers he made before vesting.  It was very beautiful. We arrived an hour early and queued up to get seats in our too small parish church.  Even though there an hour early, there were easily 200 people in line in front of us.  So, we sat towards the back.

Unfortunately, I forgot my phone (after deliberately leaving it charging right by the door specifically so I would NOT forget it) and I had to use my wife’s, which……….is set up very different from mine, had no memory left, and was also low on power.  So, with the pics and video, you get what you get.  Complaining won’t solicit any more, though if you’re on Facebook I think the parish will have professionally shot photos and videos of the event there.  My rather poor stuff below:

Processing in:

Preliminaries, vesting:

Part of the sermon on the life of Blessed Karl:

Recessional 1:

Recessional 2:

A number of photos from the Mass:

WordPress seems to not be liking many of my pics and refuses to upload them.  I may try again later, but I only have so much time and have other topics I’d like to get to today.

His Excellency Bishop Athanasius Schneider’s Visit Was a Remarkable Blessing October 21, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, FSSP, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
comments closed

I will try to post a thorough recap of yesterday’s Pontifical High Mass tomorrow, but for now a few pictures of my family with Bishop Schneider which we were blessed to take after receiving the bishop’s blessing and having a short conversation with him.  He is a gentle and virtuous man, whose concern for souls is eminently apparent from even brief interaction with him.  I thank Bishop Burns of the Diocese of Dallas for letting both the Blessed Karl Symposium and the Pontifical High Mass, involving a foreign bishop, to take place, and I again thank David Ross for putting together the symposium and making this Mass possible.  That was a most commendable work, and I know it required a huge amount of effort.

Well, it only took 9+ years, but a bishop finally offered a Pontifical High Mass at Mater Dei, and he was from………….Kazakhstan.  Hurray for the Catholic Volga Germans:

Just a note, one of the kids in the picture was not mine, and one of mine was not present.  Also, my oldest daughter got cropped out of the picture by the person taking it, but you get the idea.

I hope to post more on the Pontifical High Mass tomorrow, I planned to post complete coverage today but the Pachamama destruction came up and that was most important.

A few more to tide you over:

Good Fruit of Francis’ Revolution – TLM Attendance Skyrocketing in US October 21, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, fightback, FSSP, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Restoration, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Victory, Virtue.
comments closed

+JMJ

Finally some hard numbers to put with the numerous anecdotes about rapidly increasing TLM attendance over the past few years.  I know from surveys and speaking with many of the recent “converts” to the Traditional Latin Mass, many of these folks are seeking out sanity and good Catholic liturgy and doctrine directly as a result of the errors being taught in their former parishes, and the horrific example of Francis which is often cited in those former parishes as reasons for rejecting and contradicting the perennial belief and practice of the Church.  Thus, in spite of himself, Francis and his cohort of aging hippies and Peronists are accomplishing much good in helping strengthen the Catholic counter-revolution.

The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter has put out some attendance numbers at a few representative parishes and they all show tremendous growth, whether very new or long and established.  I do not have attendance numbers for the other Ecclesia Dei communities or diocesan TLMs, nor the SSPX, though on the latter I have had discussions with a half dozen or more people who frequent SSPX chapels who say they have seen solid growth in the past year or two.

Halfway through the FSSP’s annual October census, Fraternity parishes and chapels around the country report major increases in Sunday Mass attendance compared with last year.

Newer apostolates have seen dramatic growth, some doubling their numbers over the last year, such as Los Angeles, which went from 250 per Sunday to 500. The apostolate did not even have its own church until 2018, so finally settling down in a small church in San Fernando provided needed stability, contributing to the significant increase it saw this past year.

“The main obstacle right now is a lack of space,” said Fr. Federico Masutti, assistant pastor of St. Vitus, talking to the Missive over the summer. His words echo the sentiment of so many other FSSP apostolates that find themselves outgrowing their buildings, but it’s really a great problem to have.

“When we were at 200 people,” said pastor Fr. James Fryar, “we decided to add the fourth Mass, and just adding that one Mass, from one week to the next, another 200 people came.”

“The growth was amazing,” confirmed Fr. Masutti.

In Naples, Florida, the FSSP has been operating for less than two years, and is at nearly 400 people per Sunday, up over 20 percent from last year.

“A plethora of young families are coming, attracted by the sacred beauty and reverence of the Mass, the traditional catechesis and true parish family life,” said pastor Fr. Jonathan Romanoski…………

“It’s more than just the Latin Mass—they’re coming for the community life and all of the groups we have—for adults, for kids, for catechesis,” he said. “They come because we are two priests, we are a small community where everybody can get to know each other and the families can truly bond.”

Two new apostolates established last year—in the dioceses of Philadelphia and Providence, Rhode Island—have started off strong and now have 400 and 300 parishioners, respectively. Both locations have inherited magnificent churches that should accommodate their communities for a long time………..

……….Even apostolates that have been established for a long time (by FSSP standards) have seen significant increases, but most report constraints of space that inhibit their growth and they look forward to building or buying new churches.

St. Anne Parish, our apostolate in San Diego, for example, was established in 2008, and despite having a small church that can seat approximately 200 adults, had reached more than 800 parishioners by 2018 with three priests offering five Sunday Masses. Now, they are averaging over 1,000.

“At some of our Masses we will have as many as maybe 350 people and so not everyone fits and so people are actually sitting outside the doors looking in through open doors,” said pastor Fr. John Lyons.

Other long-established FSSP parishes that have seen strong growth include our first North American apostolate, Mater Dei in Dallas, established in 1991, which has seen its Sunday congregation grow 24 percent from 1250 to 1550 in the last year. [It’s way north of 1600 now and touching on 1800 some Sundays.  It was about 200 in 2009.]

St. Joan of Arc Parish, our apostolate in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, has gone from 650 to 840 in the past two years, an increase of about 29 percent. Likewise, St. Francis de Sales in Atlanta, established in 1995, has grown 30 percent over the last year. In October of 2018, it averaged 460 people each Sunday; so far this month, it has over 600. +

Other established parishes like St. Rose Philippine in Kansas City have also grown a great deal.

Overall, it does seem the traditional Latin Mass continues to grow and thrive in virtually all locations where it has found a home.  If you have news of your local TLM parish or diocesan parish offering a TLM, please share.  This data is  very helpful, and encourages others to seek out and experience the Mass of all ages.  We’re not weird freaks!  We have many good and devout souls and lots of normal and fun people!  We’re all finding out way through this time of unprecedented darkness within and without Holy Mother Church as best we can.  Most of all, we need to all get together and support each other, whether SSPX or ICRSS or FSSP or CMRI or whatever.  Sure we may have differences, but what binds us together, and what threatens all of us, is much, much greater.

More to post later as I have time.  Good news from Las Cruces which I hope to get to early this week, and a report on Bishop Athanasius Schneider’s spectacular Pontifical High Mass at Mater Dei in Irving on 19th Sunday after Pentecost, October 20 2019.

Notable Events: Blessed Karl Symposium in Dallas and Pontifical High Mass at Mater Dei October 15, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Restoration, Society, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
comments closed

The first Pontifical High Mass, of which I am aware, in Dallas for over 50 years is to be held this Sunday, October 20th at Mater Dei Latin Mass parish in Irving.  The Mass is at 9am.  The 11:30 high Mass is cancelled for this day.  Principal celebrant of the Mass will be His Excellency the Auxiliary Bishop of Astana in Kazakhstan, Athanasius Schneider.  Seating will be very limited.  Seating opens at the conclusion of the 7am Mass and will probably be filled within minutes.  There is spillover seating in the hall and cry room.  The Mass is projected to last approximately 3 hours.

The reason for Bishop Schneider’s visit is the Blessed Karl Symposium being held the previous day at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Dallas.  This is an annual symposium which began last year and is attracting significant personages of the Church and the former imperial family.  Bishop Schneider will be the keynote speaker at this symposium.  The local man who has gone to great effort to begin these symposiums last year and greatly expand the one this year is to be greatly commended.  This kind of work contributes significantly to the re-seeding of the great Catholic Tradition and the forgotten patrimony of the Church.  It appears that tickets for this year’s symposium, like last’s, are sold out.

Nevertheless, details below.

Finally, a brief talk from Bishop Schneider, given at Rome very recently, and attended by Cardinals Muller, Burke, Arinze, and others.  Michael Matt presents this as a budding “resistance movement” to the current pontificate.  If so, I’m afraid it may be several years late, but better now than never, I suppose.  The talk by Bishop Schneider makes clear that he, for one, sees grave theological delicts emanating from the current synod and rejects both its premises and its pre-determined outcomes (barring, of course, some dramatic divine intervention).

The Mass is likely to be crazy but I’ve never been to a pontifical high Mass and I wouldn’t miss this one!  I will try to record the sermon and share it with you if the quality is passable.  I have to think at least a little bit of Bishop Schneider’s talk below will wind up in the sermon we hear on Sunday, God willing.

Bishop Burns to Re-Consecrate Diocese to Immaculate Heart of Mary October 2, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Our Lady, Tradition, Virtue.
comments closed

There will be many public rosaries offered on October 13th, the 102nd anniversary of Our Lady’s final apparition at Fatima and the great Miracle of the Sun.  However, notably, Bishop Burns of Dallas will be leading one such Rosary, along with a procession, and formally reconsecrating the Diocese to Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart on October 13.  The procession starts at Flagpole Hill near White Rock Lake at 2 pm.  Details below.  I think we have a public Rosary already planned here in Irving at roughly the same time, but it is a great blessing that Bishop Burns will again consecrate this Diocese to Our Lady.  I believe his predecessors Bishop Dunne and possibly Bishop Gorman have already made this consecration in the past.  Nevertheless, what a blessed event, and what a positive sign from our bishop.

Dallas_Consecration_and_Rosary

Excellent Video Series on Antonio Salazar September 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, history, Restoration, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
comments closed

Antonio de Oliveira Salazar was the leader, some would say dictator, of Portugal from 1934 until his death in 1968.  Unlike Franco’s Spain, his Catholic corporatist Estado Novo (New State) survived him by several years, finally being wrecked by a coup of mid-grade hard leftist officers of Portugal’s military in 1974.

Salazar and the Estado Novo offer an interesting, and much more Catholic, alternative to what the predominant culture tells us are possible viable forms of government since the mid-20th century – hard leftism or liberal/libertine capitalism.  I’ve never been fully on board with such corporatist/distributist economic systems as outlined by Chesterton and Belloc (among many others) in the first half of the 20th century, as they seemed a bit too utopian to be practical.  But Salazar’s Portugal probably came the closest of any deliberately Catholic state (deliberate in the sense of being constructed to comport as closely as possible to the Church’s social and general magisterial beliefs up to that point in time) in achieving a reasonable mean – being Catholic, but also relatively prosperous, relatively free, and relatively non-tyrannical.  Some of my primary complaints against distributism is that it seemed a fine system for the late 18th century, but probably not too well suited for the 21st century.  Salazar’s Portugal serves as probably the best argument against that complaint.

Regarding a tyrannical state, Salazar’s Portugal was much less violent, as a government, than was the corollary next door in Franco’s Spain.  Of course, the Estado Novo had the incalculable benefit of not being founded in the midst of a brutal civil war.  Even still, however, there was a very powerful leftist faction in Portugal, which had held power several times in the decades preceding 1934, and remained a serious threat through much of Salazar’s time in power.  However, by judicously practicing Catholic Doctrine, the Salazar regime only put about 5 souls to death throughout it’s nearly 40  year existence – a far cry from the tens of thousands that died, or were killed, in Spain, even after the end of the Spanish Civil War.  Now, I’m quite sympathetic to Franco’s government and think its hand was forced by the radical, unyielding leftists it had to deal with – these leftists started the Civl War by attacking the Catholic Faith and massacring hundreds of priests and religious – but it is still an impressive achievement.  Salazar had very nearly as divided and fractious a country to manage as did Franco, but managed to do so with far less bloodshed.

Unfortunately, the quite-detailed video series I post below is not complete.  It only goes until about World War II.  Many of Salazar’s greatest social achievements – the economic rebuilding of Portugal along Catholic corporatist lines – had to wait until after World War II.  The author of the series promises that some new uploads will be coming this fall and winter – I will be sure to share those when they become available.

For now, you can learn a great deal about an important, but deliberately forgotten, leader on the world stage for much of the 20th century.  I say he was deliberately forgotten, because Salazar’s Portugal, like (to varying degrees) Franco’s Spain, and Dolfuss’ and Schussnigg’s Austria, and a few other locales, truly do serve as contrary examples to what we are told was the “only sane choice” in the “inevitable” liberal capitalist state.  Not just contrary examples, but examples that, in many ways, are more just, more moral, and – it can be argued – much  more conducive to the good of souls than the  decaying, decadent, corrupt states we find ourselves in throughout the West today.  In terms of tyranny, how many people does the United States kill each year, either here at home or abroad?  I’m no opponent of the death penalty, but it does make for an illuminating contrast.

I hope you enjoy these videos as much as I have.  Since these videos are difficult to find on Youtube, and since, for some reason, many do not show up on the channel’s playlist, I post them all below.  I knew comparitively little about Salazar’s Portugal before watching these, and most of what I had learned was harshly critical, so these videos will hopefully prove enlightening for you as well.  I know you’ll think, there’s too many, it’ll take too long, history is boooring!!!  Do yourself a favor and watch these, at one sitting or over several months, I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised, especially if you have any interest in Church history:

 

Please Pray for the Repose of the Soul of Jim Middleton [UPDATED] September 18, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, Basics, Dallas Diocese, fightback, Four Last Things, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Tradition, Virtue.
comments closed

[UPDATE]: See the bottom of the post for an addendum from my dad. I very briefly glossed over Jim’s career at Arco and he beefed it up a bit, for all of those interested.  Yes, both of you]

Longtime readers may recall that I was once on a broadcast radio show with Jim and Vicki Middleton.  The show ended in 2012 when Vicki unfortunately passed away rather suddenly.  I think that was a grace of God, I don’t think she could stand to see what this country is becoming today.  She was right about so very much, including the endlessly voracious appetite of the Left for tyranny.  Equally sadly, Jim Middleton, her spouse of many years, passed away this past September 12.  Jim was a very strong and patriotic American, a rock-solid conservative, and a devout Catholic convert.  He was also a gifted engineer and high-level oil executive and played a vital role in opening up the North Slope of Alaska to large scale oil production and later served as President of Arco Oil and Gas.  My dad worked with Jim for 25 years and knew him quite well.

The funeral was held at the Carmelite Monastery in Dallas, the same monastery that served host as the site of the diocesan Mater Dei Traditional Latin Mass community for many years prior to Mater Dei getting its own parish (one of the few good acts of the previous bishop of this Diocese, now Cardinal Kevin Farrell. “allowing” Mater Dei to have its own church – such generosity).  Jim and Vicki gave extremely generously to the Carmelite Monastery over the years, and were extremely close with, and helpful towards, the Carmelite nuns.  As such, by a special bequest, the mortal remains of both Jim and Vicki will now repose on the grounds of the monastery.

I was fortunate to be able to attend the Novus Ordo funeral Mass yesterday.  Father Paul Weinberger, who has received a good deal of attention on this blog recently, and who was very close to the Middleton’s and played a great role in their becoming stalwart Catholics from episcopal converts, offered the Mass.  So, yes, it was a Novus Ordo, but it was offered with as much reverence and dignity as is possible with this creation of “modern” man.  The sermon was very solid as usual, as Father Weinberger devoted about half of the 15 minutes to ably destroy a number of protestant talking points against the Faith, such as, we do not worship images, works done in concert with Grace are necessary for salvation, the communion of saints and the existence of purgatory, and so forth.  Since the attendance was at least 50% protestant, that was no small act, but was conducted with such charity and finesse that rather than rankle his sermon elicited a number of laughs and smiles.

Vicki and Jim were good souls and gave tremendously of their time, talent, and treasure for the good of the Church and souls.  They deserve a prayer or two, or many.  I pray I never forget them in my prayers for the souls of the deceased.

A few poor photos from the Mass.  I thank the good Carmelite sisters for again opening their chapel, as they regularly do.  I with them well and they may be assured of my prayers, too!

[Addendum]:

When the north slope was being developed, it was still a part of NAPD (North American Producing Division).  Billy Jack Lancaster headed NAPD.  Middleton was in charge of a special engineering group whose job was to fabricate the production modules and barge them from Ingleside to Point Barrow, and then offload them onto gravel causeways and roll them onto the slope.  Billy Jack smoked himself to death and died of lung cancer.  Bill Keeler head of Engineering for NAPD replaced Billy Jack.  Keeler’s 16 year old son killed Bill and his wife.  Ken Dickerson and Jim Coffee (lawyers) quickly popped the kid into Timberlawn and he never served a day in jail for the murders.  Dallas had no more men in the line of succession.  NAPD had always operated independently of Corporate (which was in LA), primarily because they generated 125% of the Corporations income.  Not no more. This opening gave LA a chance to put their own man in charge.  Then picked Glen Simpson who managed the Alaska operations – – he was a former Sinclair hand and followed orders well.  He was a rigid disaster.

Meanwhile, Middleton was placed in charge of Anaconda (a mining operation that was, unbeknownst to ARCO, badly losing money at the time they bought it), and he stopped it from hemorrhaging cash.  By that time NAPD had become Arco Oil and Gas, along with Arco Exploration and Arco Alaska.  When Simpson was forced out, Jim became President of AOGC.  He did a hell of a good job, and always backed me to the hilt.

I add, it was after Jim retired in 1994 that ARCO quickly went downhill, and its management sold out to BP in a panic in 2000.  The only remnant of ARCO today is its chain of gas stations on the West Coast and in Arizona.

Catholic Video Channels You Should be Perusing September 10, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, episcopate, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
comments closed

This post may contain old news for many readers, but I thought it should be mentioned that the quality of Catholic commentary in video form continues to increase.  While Youtube may be a wholly owned subsidiary of a parent company staffed by many of the most despicable people on earth – Google – it does host some very good Catholic content, at least until Google decides these good people are gaining too much traction, and ban-hammers them off their platform (Bitchute is a good alternative, but  it does contain quite a bit of wacky and even dangerously immoral content, but so does most everything else these days).  Right now, for this particular blogger, probably the best traditional/tradition-leaning Catholic channel on  Youtube (overall) is that of Dr. Taylor Marshall.  I’m a bit surprised at coming to this conclusion, for while I have known Taylor and his family for years in passing through our local TLM parish, for many years I wasn’t a huge fan.  His content seemed to tend towards the conservative/neo-Catholic for quite some time.  So while he did do some great works like being a or the founder of the Troops of St. George, I found him a bit squishy on a number of topics, especially those closest to the core elements of the traditional critique of the post-conciliar Church.

But that was then.  Starting about 12-18 months ago, and especially in the wake of the Vigano expose and the Church’s “summer of shame” (hint: there will be worse to come, much worse), Taylor really got red-pilled and became quite a hard-hitting critic of the crisis in the Church.   His views generally align quite closely with my own, which of course means he is absolutely right about purt’ near everything.  Seriously, I don’t want to overplay my criticism of the Taylor of 5 years ago, he was generally solid all along, but over the past year he’s really been clobbering the evil forces acting within and against Holy Mother Church.   I now make a point of catching all of his videos as early as I can, and agree with most everything both Dr. Marshall and his co-host Dr. Tim Gordon have to say (but not quite – sadly, noone is quite so perfect as me).  They are addressing most all the major crisis issues in the Church today and doing so from a steadfastly traditional viewpoint, and not pulling any punches over sacred cows like the current occupant of the papacy, the heresies emanating from Rome in these dark days, and the root of the crisis beginning far before Vatican II.  I still hope to put together a real magnum opus (hah) podcast on that subject, but baby steps.

Another great source which I have highlighted before is the inestimable Charles Coulombe.  I love his weekly uploads at Tumblar House and find his talks, if possible, even more edifying than those of Taylor Marshall.  Charles is both a rock with regard to the Faith, and is especially strong on the absolutely vital issue of Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus (I cannot recommend his book on the subject enough, it is eye-opening, even for one well-versed in Trad literature), and is also a veritable fount of knowledge on matters related to Church history and Catholic culture (rather unlike the website of the same name).  It is well worth your time to dedicating an hour or so a week listening to his Youtube videos.  While Taylor’s viewership has exploded, Coulombe’s remains relatively static, which is a real shame, because his commentary is equally deserving of a far wider audience.

Next, there is another source I’ve recommended many times, but it bears repeating:  The Fatima Center.  Even with the untimely deaths of Fr. Nicholas Gruner and Mr. Charles Vennari, they regularly upload, almost weekly, very good catechetical materials from extremely traditional sources.  I find especially the videos from Fr. Isaac Mary Relyea edifying and entertaining.

Then, there is Return to Tradition by Anthony Stine.  A bit like Taylor Marshall’s content, it is both contemporary and topical.  In fact, one might liken it sort of a pocket version of Taylor’s much longer broadcasts, covering many of the same topics from a generally similar view (though, of course, they differ in a number of details) but in a much shorter format.  It’s a worthy site, especially his excerpts from Church doctrinal documents in his weekend uploads, but in terms of preference is probably properly listed in terms of order in this post.  HIs production values are of a bit lower standard than the other three.

And, of course, there remains the grand-daddy of all Catholic Youtube channels of which I am aware, that of Sensus Fidelium and the daily uploads of sermons from very solidly orthodox and traditional priests.  I’m certain most all readers will be aware of this channel already.

And now, good listeners, I turn the floor over to you, to solicit other “channels” you may find worthwhile on Youtube or other, similar platforms.  One problem today is the veritable embarrassment of riches, it is difficult at times to keep up with more than a few channels, especially when they produce prodigious amounts of content like Dr. Marshall and Sensus Fidelium. I of course also enjoy the weekly commentaries from Michael Matt at The Remnant, and some other less explicitly Catholic but more historical efforts that still tie in with the Church’s proud history.  Nevertheless, I would appreciate any recommendations you have, especially for solid but lesser known channels.

I have another, far more obscure channel to bring to your attention at a later date, God willing, but that is such a different topic and requires an extensive introduction, and so it must  wait for another time.

 

Michael Matt – Unite the Traditional Clans! August 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Restoration, sanctity, SSPX, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
comments closed

I have learned over the past few months that I have missed an incredible amount of infighting between traditional/orthdox Catholics.  In fact I haven’t missed it at all, I’m glad I haven’t had to witness all that.  With Francis continuing to try to change the Bride of Christ into a pathetic, modernist worldly construct, a creation not of God but of men,  never has there been a greater need for unity among the most devout, believing Catholics, whatever they call themselves.  I have long been of this opinion, which I share with such stalwart defenders of the Faith as Fathers Michael Rodriguez and Isaac Mary Relyea, two men who have suffered more than most of us will ever have to for their rejection of the post-conciliar construct.

There are legitimate criticisms of, or concerns regarding, all branches of traditional Catholicism in these days.  That is one of the chief  coups of the modernists dominating the hierarchy of the Church, to use Catholics own faith and fidelity to the Magisterium against them.  By corrupting that magisterium, they have managed to put Catholics in a “damned if they do, damned if they don’t situation.”  While the SSPX seems to be slowly leaning towards some kind of formal recognition from Rome (and some would argue it already exists), there remains great hostility in the institutional Church to them, and much fussiness over their purported canonical status.  The Ecclesia Dei communities and diocesan priests offering the TLM forever have to live with the taint of ostensible accommodation, and the constant threat that all they have achieved and built over the past several decades could be snatched away in an instant by a hostile pope.

Each of the traditional groups has their strengths and weaknesses.  Certainly there is room for legitimate expression of these differences, but the constant internecine struggles between these various groups has long passed the point of ceasing to be productive, and is most often positively destructive. It is so easy for all of us to fall into tribalism and the belief that “our side” is not just the right one, but the only good and decent one.  From that belief can spring all kinds of animus and destructiveness.  It is the ultimate circular firing squad, and could not be more ill-timed or counter-productive, given the collective threats we all face from the current pontificate and the upcoming Amazonian synod. This should be a time of conciliation, not ever-increasing conflict and strife.

Thus, I heartily support Michael Matt in attempting to bring collaboration and commonality of purpose among all those priests, religious, and lay people struggling to live out the Faith in this time of unprecedented crisis within the institutional Church.  Every single growing, vibrant traditional parish is a beacon of hope for millions of those who call themselves Catholic, whether they realize it or not.  They are a hope for the present and the future, and, in my mind, represent the only real future the Church has, by returning to her roots and her real self.  And, if we continue to work together, we can hope for the coming restoration of Holy Mother Church, as Mr. Matt in describing how the FSSP taking over a dying Minneapolis parish has now totally turned the parish around.  He then lists some criticisms of the FSSP, presumedly coming from the SSPX, and proceeds to refute those.  I’m not certain if his piece was in response to something in particular, but the article could just as easily have been framed in the opposite way, defending the SSPX from FSSP criticisms.  I don’t think the particular framing is most important, I think what is most important is the overall message of looking for the good in all the various branches of traditional Catholicism and working together to maximize their effect in terms of saving souls and, even more importantly, giving all glory and honor to God.

I did, however, want to address a few points Mr. Matt raises, which I will do below:

Yes, okay. Fine!  But the FSSP does not condemn Pope Francis on a daily basis.

Again, true enough. But neither did Edmund Campion run around publicly condemning the tyrant and heretics of his day.  Instead, he chose to dress as a layman—a jeweler—and to call himself ‘Mr. Edmunds’ so that he could avoid arrest and carry on with the important work of preserving the old Faith in Elizabethan England. He wasn’t a coward. He was a strategist, who would eventually be starved, beaten, disemboweled and drawn and quartered for his fidelity the old Faith.

It’s called strategy. Maybe you’ve seen pictures. You know, Father Miguel Pro undercover, dressed in suit and tie, as he waged holy war in defense of the old Faith during the Cristero uprising. Dressed in disguise, was Father Pro afraid to ‘say it like it is’? Please!

There’s more than one way to get the job done, friends, and the job right now is to preserve the old Faith at all costs. ‘Sayin it like it is’ in times like these is sometimes just a really stupid thing to do! It’d be like Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg shouting condemnations of the psycho Nazis as he walked into the Wolf’s Lair with a bomb under his arm, preparing to assassinate Hitler. Not a good time for Claus to ‘say it like it is.’

Let’s not shoot ourselves (or the few good priests left) in the head by calling for recklessness when prudence and strategy are obviously working so well to save souls and to attach so many young people to the cause of Traditional Catholic restoration. [These are all fine points, but I will say that I have heard very strong condemnations of Francis from a number of FSSP priests.  And, I have heard similar condemnations from diocesan and other traditional or traditionally inclined priests.  I don’t know if condemnations of this kind are more frequent and severe from SSPX priests, but I will simply note that it would be a falsehood, in my experience, to declare Francis gets a pass from Ecclesia Dei priests.]

Yes, well, the FSSP priests don’t like the SSPX and vice versa.  Maybe that’s true in some cases, but so what!  The Dominicans and the Franciscans didn’t always get along, either……….. [This is the other point I wanted to touch on, it is true, there are some FSSP and other non-SSPX traditional priests who are extremely critical of the SSPX. Some of this criticism, to my mind, goes beyond the bounds of reason. I know the reverse is also widely true.  However,  many FSSP priests have quite warm attitudes towards the SSPX, and are well disposed towards them, generally speaking.  Like all organizations made up of hundreds of passionate, committed people, you’re going to see a variety of points of view.  That may be a milquetoast manner of speaking, but it’s true.  I wish all priests in all these groups were much more supportive and possessed of a common purpose, but at Mr. Matt notes immediately below, all priests are humans and as prone to human failings as the rest of us].

So, there are precedents. We’re all human…even priests.

Bottom line: When I was at Mass last Sunday at the local FSSP parish, I saw dozens of little children kneeling at the consecration, striking their breasts at the elevation, receiving Holy Communion on the tongue in the company of their mothers and fathers and rafts of siblings.

It reminded me of the little Japanese children I’d seen at the SSPX chapel in Tokyo the month before—kneeling at the consecration, striking their breasts at the elevation, receiving Holy Communion on the tongue in the company of their mothers and fathers and rafts of siblings………

…………I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: Unite the clans! For God’s sake and the sake of those children facing the real possibility of the eradication of the old Faith from the face of the earth— unite the clans!

I couldn’t agree more, or close on a better note.  We have so much in common, and so much to fight for together, that the differences between us can really take a back seat for the foreseeable future.

By the way, Twitter drives people insaneJust sayin‘.  I can not advise anyone enough to stay off it.  None of my rapidly growing into adulthood kids are on it and, I pray, never will be.