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Catholic Tradition in Prayer: Saint Patrick’s Breastplate August 3, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Interior Life, Saints, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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According to tradition, St. Patrick wrote this hymn in AD 433 for divine protection before successfully converting the Irish king Leoghaire and his subjects from paganism to Christianity.  The breastplate of course references Ephesians vi:12-18, wherein St. Paul describes the various armaments we must take on (those of prayer and virtue) in order to do battle with the principalities and powers of this world.  So the name is quite apropos for the combat the great Saint of Ireland engaged in in converting a violent pagan country to the sweet yoke of Jesus Christ.

Some dispute whether the prayer really is that ancient, but at any rate it is beautiful, and since I had never come across it before reading The Gentle Traditionalist, I figured you may not be familiar with it, either.  Or maybe it’s widely known, I really don’t know.  At any rate, here it is:

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness
of the Creator of creation.

I arise today
Through the strength of Christ’s birth with His baptism,
Through the strength of His crucifixion with His burial,
Through the strength of His resurrection with His ascension,
Through the strength of His descent for the judgment of doom.

I arise today
Through the strength of the love of cherubim,
In the obedience of angels,
In the service of archangels,
In the hope of resurrection to meet with reward,
In the prayers of patriarchs,
In the predictions of prophets,
In the preaching of apostles,
In the faith of confessors,
In the innocence of holy virgins,
In the deeds of righteous men.

I arise today, through
The strength of heaven,
The light of the sun,
The radiance of the moon,
The splendor of fire,
The speed of lightning,
The swiftness of wind,
The depth of the sea,
The stability of the earth,
The firmness of rock.

I arise today, through
God’s strength to pilot me,
God’s might to uphold me,
God’s wisdom to guide me,
God’s eye to look before me,
God’s ear to hear me,
God’s word to speak for me,
God’s hand to guard me,
God’s shield to protect me,
God’s host to save me
From snares of devils,
From temptation of vices,
From everyone who shall wish me ill,
afar and near.

I summon today
All these powers between me and those evils,
Against every cruel and merciless power
that may oppose my body and soul,
Against incantations of false prophets,
Against black laws of pagandom,
Against false laws of heretics,
Against craft of idolatry,
Against spells of witches and smiths and wizards,
Against every knowledge that corrupts man’s body and soul;
Christ to shield me today
Against poison, against burning,
Against drowning, against wounding,
So that there may come to me an abundance of reward.

Christ with me,
Christ before me,
Christ behind me,
Christ in me,
Christ beneath me,
Christ above me,
Christ on my right,
Christ on my left,
Christ when I lie down,
Christ when I sit down,
Christ when I arise,
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me,
Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me,
Christ in every eye that sees me,
Christ in every ear that hears me.

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness
of the Creator of creation.

———-End Quote————

It’s rather pretty and, I would say, quite lyrically Irish, is it not? I like it quite a bit. I hope to add this regularly to my prayer rotation.  God willing.

Perhaps this prayer might be invoked with the great evangelist Saint Patrick that the Church might be gifted with men of similar faith, devotion, and willingness to speak the truth in our own age.  The Church desperately needs some new Saints to reinvigorate the remaining faithful and begin converting the fallen away masses.

PS there are shorter versions of this prayer.  They basically are limited to the last half of the above.

Traditional Book Review: The Gentle Traditionalist by Roger Buck July 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Christendom, cultural marxism, General Catholic, history, Latin Mass, paganism, Restoration, Revolution, scandals, secularism, sickness, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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Kind reader skeinster, who I know and value so much in real life for her perspectives as a longtime trad and observer of trads, gave me a copy of Roger Buck’s The Gentle Traditionalist to read.  Bucks two books – The Gentle Traditionalist and Cor Jesu Sacratissimum – have attracted rave reviews from the likes of Dr. Peter Kwasniewski, Charles Coulombe, and Joseph Shaw.  Both books have received almost unanimous 5 star reviews on Amazon.  A few people gave it 4 stars.

I would probably have to fall into this latter camp as well, for while I appreciate the work – especially the first half – and find its lighthearted approach refreshing in a traditional Catholic tome, I felt the author missed the point on two key subjects – the “evils” of capitalism and the pernicious influence of the United States –  and glossed over the liturgical revolution in the Church and its effects a bit much.  I am no longer entirely certain that “the Mass is the Mass is the Mass” irrespective of how disordered, abusive, or downright heretical it is.  Having said that, I also know there are much more beautiful, uplifting, and reverent means of offering the Novus Ordo.  Call me a bit agnostic on this subject.

First, the good parts.  The author very skillfully exposes that the ultimate struggle ongoing in the West (and, through the Anglosphere’s overpowering influence, the world) is not one of politics, not even one of culture, but one of religion.  He adroitly reveals what has been obvious to this blog for years, but which took me other years to discover on my own – the modern left-libertine cultural-political-social agenda movement is not, as it likes to present itself, simply the natural product of a scientific inquiry and rationalist thought, but is in fact a highly organized, tightly controlled religion, and one that is inveterately hostile to it’s longtime nemesis and competitor, the Catholic Christian Faith.  Even more, the author notes that this religion – which he calls the New Secular Religion, and I, more clumsily, refer to as sexular paganism, creates enormous power and room to maneuver for itself by steadfastly denying its religious basis, even though we see the religious nature of sexular paganism exposed more and more everyday, with heresies declared, anathemas issued, and (un)holy wars proclaimed.  As author Buck notes, because it is the religion of the shapers of mass popular culture – the media, academia, virtually all corporate titans, and the vast majority of politicians – secularism literally gets away with murder.  And mass murder at that, given the ongoing genocide of abortion and the rising genocide of the old and infirm in so-called euthanasia.

All this is brilliantly conveyed and powerfully argued – but in a folksy, approachable way missing in many books related to the traditional Catholic – or, I should say, Catholic – critique of both the culture and the Church.  In fact, I found myself wishing at times this book had been available in, say, 2010 or so – it would have saved me 3 years or more of figuring this out for myself!

There author also touches on elements of Catholic history that have been deliberately glossed over, if not ignored entirely, in the propaganda machines cum education-industrial complexes in the West, and in particular in the Anglosphere.  When For Greater Glory came out in 2012, I was shocked to find how few Catholics had ever heard of the Cristiada or know that there had been a violent, bloody persecution of Catholics persist for decades literally right next door to the US.  Similar elements of Catholic reaction to the ongoing sexular pagan revolution – the Carlists, the Spanish Civil War, the War in the Vendee, various Irish uprisings against protestant English rule – receive mention.

I also found absolutely fantastic the distinction the author makes between being gentle, and being “nice.” I would be remiss in not mentioning this detail – the spiritual adviser, the “gentle traditionalist” of the book, is very much just that. I do appreciate his gentleness and think this is a great example of how to do evangelization, even proselytization, in a way that is probably very well suited to this era of easily hurt feelings and mass emasculation.  Nevertheless, Buck notes that very much of what is wrong with the culture, especially with regard to decaying moral (and ecclesiastical) norms stems from a fear of not being “nice,” which means, ever causing anyone to feel uncomfortable or have their feelings hurt.  The Gentle Traditionalist would be a terror on today’s college campuses among generation snowflake.  The author also, at least tacitly, exposed much of what is wrong within the Church herself these past several decades: the triumph of the feminized “Church of Nice” over the Church of the Apostles, Fathers, and Doctors.

Even more importantly, the author rightly notes that the original source of the New Secular Religion, as he calls it, is the protestant heresy and revolt.  How the author can then turn around and declare that protestantism merely represents an “imperfect confession” of the Faith was a bit puzzling, for protestantism is the seed bed of literally everything sexular paganism represents – rejection of authority, exaltation of human “reason” above God’s revealed Truth, tolerance (and eventual promotion of) sexual license, a wholly distorted understanding of virtue and the the nature of right piety and devotion, etc., etc.  I felt there was some unfortunate influence of the post-VII ecumenical movement, here.  But, in truth, this was a brief and unfortunate departure from the book’s fairly comprehensive attack on protestantism as the ultimate root of the assault on Christendom by the New Secular Religion (I will say, however, that I think the author also glosses over grave problems in the Orthodox Churches, as well, and the growing number of heresies stemming from those bodies, but, given what’s been emanating from Rom in the past few years and decades, who am I to judge?).

More systemic problems throughout the book are the author’s obvious lack of understanding of the United States and its people, and his wholesale attacks on capitalism.  Now, we all have baggage from our past. I quite frequently wonder the degree to which my lifelong conservatism/right wing nuttiness may be influencing my conception of the Church and Church belief.  It is probable I color various understandings on these weighty matters with my own preferences.

The author was a longtime liberal, even, it seems, a devoted member of the unchurch of sexular paganism himself.  He is also a Britisher, and seems to derive much of his understanding of both (what is represented as) capitalism and the United States from incredibly biased British media coverage (the author also seems to believe that climate change is real, caused by humans, and is largely the fault of what he calls capitalism.  But ever seen the environmental record of communist/hard socialist states?).  His numerous snide comments regarding the United States and our supposed embrace of “capitalism run riot” aside  (I really don’t think the author has much experience of the United States or Americans, and fails to note hugely important distinctions, such as the massive socialist welfare state that has existed in the US for decades, or the fact that Americans on average, and Christian Americans in particular, are far, far more generous in giving to charity than any European populace, which points up a hugely important distinction: the fact that the US has a relatively smaller welfare state than most Eurozone countries does not mean that the US is a hard-hearted, un-Christian place.  It means that many Americans would rather do their charity themselves, rather than have the government do it for them, all the while keeping a huge proportion for itself and gravely injuring civil liberties given by God in the process), the main weakness with his arguments, to me, are his constant denunciations of capitalism, or what he believes capitalism is.

Now, again, taking into account differing life experiences and preferences, when I repeatedly encounter phrases like “wage slavery,” lifted directly from Das Kapital, I take a bit of exception.

Without going into too much detail, or becoming overly critical, I would simply say that the author shares a very prevalent bias, one that is even more common in Europe in the United States, when it comes to understanding capitalism.  Capitalism is simply, at its essence, the free exchange of goods and services among private individuals at agreed upon rates.  Capitalism was not invented by Adam Smith.  It is the default economic system that has virtually always arisen among groups of men at all stages of history, whether it be based on barter, gold coins, or paper dollars.  This system has sometimes, naturally, had elements of collectivism, and at other times and places, been much more individualistic.

What we have today in the United States, and even more so in Europe (and have had for decades, even a century or more in some nations) is a capitalist-socialist hybrid, highly influenced and controlled by government, with government often picking winners and losers.  Those winners tend to be established players who already have great wealth and influence, and who, almost unanimously, adhere to the New Secular Religion.  The distortion of the free market, and government’s almost total dominance over it in many nations, is a huge factor both in the spread of the New Secular Religion and in the inability to fight back against it. In fact, many Americans, at least, view a free market as being a vital means to resist the spread of the New Secular Religion, just as many other Americans view socialistic policies as being vital to its continuing spread.  In brief, I think the historical evidence and that from the present day both strongly indicate that the New Secular Religion, as Buck calls it, is inseparable from the socialist state, and the more socialist the state, the more secularist it is, at least in the West.  (I won’t even go into the numerous mentions of the US’ lack of a government-forced single payer health care scheme, which is presently causing thousands of murders a  year in Holland and has moved Britain to ration health care to a draconian decree – no heart surgery for you if you are fat or smoke too much!  I doubt the author has any idea how terribly health services have declined, and costs increased, even with the semi-single payer Obamacare.  It’s been an unmitigated disaster for the vast majority of Americans who constitute the middle class).

At any rate, suffice it to say that we disagree on this rather substantial point.  I would also say that, politically, the New Secular Religion has always been primarily promoted by the political and economic Left, and that it is no accident that both the communist governments that have taken root, and the more socialist governments of the world, have all been profoundly anti-Christian and especially anti-Catholic. Meanwhile, capitalism happily coexisted with Catholicism from its founding up until about 150 years ago.  Distributism, which the author seems to promote (but doesn’t really flesh out to any degree), is a nice dream, but I have grave concerns that it is not simply another economic utopian fantasy that would wind up getting a whole lot of people dead, of necessity, in order to implement it.  But I won’t rehash those arguments now.

I would simply rebut with this: no economic system has lifted more people out of poverty more quickly than capitalism, even in its limited, distorted, and government-dominated form of today.  Professor Jordan Peterson claims that more people (300 million) have been lifted out of poverty in the last decade than at any time in human history, and the rate is actually increasing, with 35-40 million growing out of poverty every year now.

All of this is not unimportant.  As I noted, to me, there is far, far greater correlation between the rise of totalitarianism, religious persecution, and the advance of the “New Secular Religion” or sexular paganism,  with socialism/Leftism than there is between these terrible features of the modern world and capitalism.

Not that there are not serious problems with both capitalism and the United States. There are, and I have discussed them at length, especially regarding the latter.  Modern capitalism, with government encouragement, too often descends into usury. And the US – along with every other similar nation – is fundamentally disordered in not having Jesus Christ as its visible Head and the Catholic Faith as its state religion.

I should regroup here, and say that even with these points of disagreement, I still liked the book, I recommend it (with some caution regarding the points above), and would give it 3 1/2 to 4 stars out of 5. [On reconsideration, I would say more like 3 stars.  The anti-capitalist rants are really quite extensive and actually form a key part of the book’s argumentation, while socialism/Leftism as economic factors in the decline of Christendom (and inextricably linked with the rise of the New Secular Religion) are passed by virtually without comment. I have a serious problem with that] I will almost certainly purchase the author’s other book Cor Iesu Sacratisissimum, since it it much longer and, I believe, is supposed to explain his understanding of ecclesiology, theology, and related matters in much greater depth.

I did particularly enjoy the excerpt from The Deer’s Cry, or St. Patrick’s Breastplate, the author included.  This is an ancient Irish prayer attributed to St. Patrick, and I found it quite moving and beautiful.  I hope to find time to post that tomorrow or sometime soon.

Overall, there is much more good in the book than anything I can find fault with.  Many other readers, apparently, did not find nearly so much to be concerned over as I did, or they were willing to let those things pass by.  That’s fine.  I’m interested to know if any of you have read the book, and, if so, what you thought of it.  I went on at length in some of my criticisms, but that’s really more an indication of my inability to unpack and criticique thoughts efficiently, than it is of the amount of book that is devoted to the subjects I find less perfectly cogitated.  Really, the vast majority of the book is quite solid, and I enjoyed it quite a bit.

Whew, longest post I’ve done in a while.  If you’re still here, you deserve a beer or a cigarette or a gold star…..something.  How about a nice glass of Skittlebrau?

Kind of an inside joke if you haven’t read the book.

 

Kinda Neat, Kinda Flightline Friday July 26, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in catachesis, Flightline Friday, fun, history, huh?, Latin Mass, sanctity, Society.
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So I stumbled upon this the other day:

This is the patch of the 67th Cyberspace Wing, Lackland AFB, TX.  Formerly the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, which RF-4Cs used to wake me up Every. Saturday. Morning. at 7am when I lived in Austin. Flew right over my ghetto apartment.

At any rate, Lux Ex Tenebris is, of course, a phrase that emanates from the Catholic faith, most particularly, Tenebrae during Holy Week.  Lux Ex Tenebris means “Light out of Darkness,” which is the very essence of our Blessed Lord’s Passion, Death, and Resurrection.

So, on the one hand, I want to say, that’s neat.  Maybe some devout Catholic helped devise this motto?

Of course, this is not the old 67th TRW, unarmed and scared shitless unafraid, flying solo missions over hostile territory to gather photographic intelligence. No, this is the 67th Cyberspace Wing, whose mission is to “train and ready airmen to execute computer network exploitation and attack. It also executes full-spectrum Air Force network operations, training, tactics, and management.”

So maybe it does things like trying to hack into sensitive computer networks of potentially hostile great powers like Russia or China? Maybe they hack into North Korea’s missile program?

Or maybe does it ever work with the NSA in prying very deeply – to a degree that would be unbelievable to the Founders of this nation – into the personal affairs of private citizens?

Hard to tell in this day and age. And the wing is probably fortunate most people today are wholly ignorant of both Latin and the connection this phrase has to the Catholic Faith.  Otherwise, they would probably be forced to change it.

The motto dates back to the Korean War, and the unit’s activation at that time.  Maybe an early CO or DCO was a devout Catholic, and tried to sacralize the wing from its start.  Or perhaps they simply had some knowledge of Latin, though this phrase has, in the Western parlance, always had an overwhelmingly liturgical association.  Then again, the United States of 1951 was a much more Christian, much better educated nation.  If airmen from then could be magically transported to today, they would find the place unrecognizable, and be heartbroken to know that, whatever their efforts against external enemies, this nation has very nearly fallen to internal ones.

BDA from 67th TRW RF-4C, Operation Desert Storm

Archbishop Lefebvre in a White Cassock July 13, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, episcopate, General Catholic, history, Latin Mass, priests, Tradition, true leadership.
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I posted a picture of a local priest in a white cassock, and some people had some questions about it.  I used to have the same questions.  In brief, the Church has long permitted those priests – and bishops, too – in tropical climates to wear white cassocks more acclimated to the torrid conditions.  The Fraternity of St. Peter gave permission to the priests here in Dallas to wear white cassocks in the summer months, generally June, July, and August.  They aren’t worn terribly often, but you seem them occasionally.  I think they look really smart.

At any rate, as a testimony to this long practice, here is Archbishop Lefebvre in a white cassock when he was a priest of the Holy Ghost Fathers in Africa:

Another, as a bishop:

As I said, the use extends to bishops and cardinals

You will frequently see African bishops wearing white cassocks.  In the US it’s much more rare but as I said permission can be sought and obtained in certain locales.

This rather piddling post is all I have time for today.

Leftist “anti-fascists” applaud speech entirely composed of Hitler quotes July 10, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in asshatery, cultural marxism, disaster, error, foolishness, General Catholic, history, horror, rank stupidity, scandals, secularism, sickness, Society, unadulterated evil.
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At a “Trump impeachment” rally in impoverished, decaying, and debt-ridden Chicago, a Kekistani-type troll gave a speech composed entirely of Hitler quotes.  The speech was moderately well received, but, interestingly, the organizer of the demonstration was quite impressed and asked the speaker to come back and deliver more quotes from Mein Kampf, the Nuremberg Rallies, and other such great events in the history of culturo-political leftism:

Hilarious.  Reading these quotes, the socialist-leftist origins of National Socialism are readily apparent.  The Left has succeeded amazingly in perpetuating the lie that the Nazis were somehow a “right wing” phenomenon, and then directing attention away from the evils of the Soviet Union, Maoist China, and other unmistakably leftist hellholes, and getting most all of the West to see in Hitler history’s greatest monster (compared to Stalin, Mao, and other communists, he was a piker).  And yet his language is exactly their own.

In point of fact, the American Left and its dominance of the democrat party pose an infinitely larger threat to what remains of American liberty and freedom than Donald Trump or any other non-extreme-fringe creature of the right.  The extreme fringe has become the middle in the democrat party today.  When they imagine portents of violent repression and government-enforced ideological compliance, they are but projecting their own dreams and aspirations onto their ideological opponents, yet again.  In modern political history, the Left has killed exponentially more than the right in the pursuit of its illusory, unobtainable paradise on earth.

And yet…….and yet……it is not entirely without basis to describe the USCCB as the democrat party at prayer.  Knowing that tells you all you need to know about the state of the Church in this country.  And compared to their counterparts around the world, the US bishops lean somewhat conservative.  Thus the state of the Church today, since the sudden and open coup engineered in the mid-60s.

Multi-Part Tour through the Spanish Missions of San Antone: Part II, Mission June 14, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Christendom, Ecumenism, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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The first part covered Mission Concepion, this post covers Mission San Francisco de la Espada.

I again will give some coverage of the general and liturgical history of the mission, while sharing a number of photographs I took.  Mission Espada – and in particular the chapel – fell into more complete ruins than just about any of the missions.  Mission San Jose experienced a horrific roof/wall collapse in the 1890s during Mass – no death toll was reported, but it gives an idea of the decrepitude into which these structures were allowed to slide.  When locals finally took notice of the significance of these decayed treasures, protestants played a significant role in funding and restoring all the missions.  Strangely enough.

The main facade of the chapel is really about all that is original to the structure.  Most of the rest of the building was replaced in the 20th century.  You can see at the top the local bricks which were made by natives and were used in the construction of this mission.  These are supposed to be some of the first masonry bricks made in Texas.

The door is an interesting shape and attracts a good amount of intention.  It is shaped almost like a keyhole.  I do not think the doors are original.  They are heavily weathered but being cedar I would guess they are somewhere on the order of 80-100 years old.  Again, most of the original doors, furnishings, statues, and even stone structure of the original missions was removed by locals – primarily the descendants of the natives who originally occupied the missions – for their own private use from the 1790s onwards as the missions were forcibly secularized by the Spanish government and the mission communities rapidly fell apart thereafter.

The bells are still functional, and these are the pulls they use to ring them at the start of Mass to this day.  I did not get a clear answer on whether the bells are original or not, but it was great to see a parish that still has real bells and uses them – though not for calling the Angelus, unfortunately.

Another shot showing the interior of the door and the pull cords for the bells.  The stucco interior is a 20th century replacement.

As I said, these chapels are still in regular use.  I had to go to Mission Espada and Mission San Juan twice, in the first case because a Confirmation? was going on, and the second because Mission San Juan is really only on Sundays for Mass and occasionally for special events.

But I’m a trooper, and went back the next day, Sunday, to visit the chapels when I knew they would be open but empty. You can get a sense for the small size of the chapels, this one, I would estimate, is about 3/4 the size of the local Carmelite chapel. Some Dallasites will know how small that is.

Mission Espada has been as thoroughly wreckovated as any of the missions.  While it is gratifying to see a tabernacle in all of them, altar rails and high altars were all removed at some point.

These statues are wonderful, and if not original to the mission they are close period pieces or excellent replicas.  I’m quite certain the statue of our suffering Savior is of Spanish Colonial origin, but I’ll get to that later.

Some kind of structure remains where the proper pre-conciliar altar would have been.  I saw these in two of the missions, a large stone or concrete block.  I am imagining it formed the basic structure of the original altars before they were removed.

Mission Espada contains no trace that I could detect of the original altar or altar rails, which is sad, since at least replicas of the originals or some kind of pre-conciliar replacement would have been in place during the general restoration of the 1920s-30s.

Beautiful statue of Our Lady.  I do love the polychrome.  I don’t what vintage the crucifix is, but it was also very pretty though shunted off to the side and largely blocked by flowers.

Sorry the lighting is so poor on this, even with flash the image was shrouded in shadows. This is a magnificent colonial era crucifix, or a great replica.  The hair would be real human hair, as was the custom min the Spanish colonies.  Polychromed, and possibly carved by local natives, whether they were original natives to these missions or not.  There was no one around to answer any questions about Mission Espada or any of the remaining art.

This is a glorious statue and so evocative of both the period and Spanish liturgical style generally.  The joints are bunched up because the arms can be repositioned for various poses, though I doubt anyone has dared to do that with this statue in many years.  Amazing that such craftsmanship could be achieved with nothing but hand tools.  I imagine all the interior mechanisms are wood.  I have no idea what condition they are in, or whether they have various fabrics with which to dress Our Savior for different festivals or liturgical periods.  I tend to think not.

I also don’t know how old these pews are – they look quite old and worn – but was again amazed by their quality given that they are probably at least a century or so old, and could be quite older.  Again, nothing but hand tools like chisels and awls made such sturdy, long-lasting pews.  Very impressive to an amateur woodworker like me.

Ceiling.  I just love how that aged cedar looks.

St. Francis.

Out of time, I’ll try to post more tomorrow.  And I plan on covering my favorite, the most traditional, liturgically, Mission San Juan Capistrano.

One thing that strikes me is that absolutely NONE of this would exist if the Church had the same attitude towards evangelization then that it has today.  The Church has truly been betrayed by her own, she is almost unrecognizable from her historical self.

Multi-Part Tour through the Spanish Missions of San Antone June 8, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, General Catholic, history, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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So this past weekend, after probably close to 100 lifetime visits to the San Antonio area, I finally went and visited the four Spanish Mission parishes that are still extant in the southern part of town.  Yes there is technically a fifth, San Antonio de Valero aka The Alamo, but that site has nothing of a religious character left to it and is always annoyingly crowded.

I took a lot of pictures, and want to give some assessment both of the history of each mission – especially it’s liturgical history and changes since the Council – and its current state, so I will cover one mission each in a post on a different day.  First up, the first we went to Mission Nuestra Señora de la Purísima Concepción de Acuña, aka Mission Concepcion.  I’ll sort of scroll through with some pics and provide a rolling commentary:

Mission Concepcion was begun in San Antonio in 1731.  The actual mission building you see above was started in 1740 and completed in 1755.  Of all the San Antonio missions, Mission Concepcion is by far the most architecturally intact, having been built on bedrock, in never experienced near total collapse as several other of the missions did during the period of their abandonment and neglect from circa late 1790s to 1880s.  What you see above is largely how it would have appeared in its heyday, except for the missing white plaster/stucco and some architectural ornaments which have been lost.

The nicho above is empty, but probably held a statue at one time. Unfortunately during the long years of neglect many features of the buildings were damaged, destroyed, or stolen, including entire sets of 18 foot solid cedar doors.

Inscriptions above the main doors.  Details like this from the other missions have been loss due to the disrepair into which they fell.  But here the inscription is still largely legible though it fails to make sense to me.  Perhaps some parts are missing?

It is known that the interiors and exteriors of all the missions were covered with extensive painted frescoes done by local Indian artisans.  These details were lost on other missions due to their decay, but remain at least a little intact at Mission Concepcion.  All of these are interior frescoes, any exterior painting was lost long ago along with the stucco:

“Brother sun?”  Also perhaps a representation of the Holy Spirit.

Vandalism and lack of care caused the vast majority of the frescoes to be lost.  I was shocked how many statues had their heads shot off by bonehead Texans, Mexicans, or Tejanos back in the day.

The above is a small side chapel.

Main part of the church.  The walls have been repainted.  The sanctuary has been extensively remodeled/wreckovated.  As you will see in later posts, sometimes the high altars were permitted to remain, sometimes portions of them were removed to side chapels, and sometimes they were entirely ripped out.  The huge stone (concrete?) base of the original high altar here remains but little else.  A new table altar fronts the altar of the Immemorial Mass which was offered in these sacred buildings for decades.  At least some altar rail remains though I doubt it is ever used.

That’s definitely 18th-century era Spanish or New World Latin American painting, or a good replica.  I suspect it is genuine, but almost certainly not original to any of the missions, as most such movable art was lost years ago.

It is good to see tabernacles in all the main chapels, which held the Blessed Sacrament.  All the missions are still active parishes.

Looking back to choir loft, which is no longer used.  It is occupied with AC ducts.

Over 250 year old hand-painted Indian art.  Quite good.

Don’t know for certain, but I suspect this may be the Mission’s original altar crucifix, or a near-period piece.  It is definitely Spanish Colonial and I love the polychrome.  Is polychrome even done anymore?  It gives such a wonderful, durable finish!

Period statue.  Our Lady, but bare-headed?  I originally thought an angel, but there are angels under her feet.  I guess it’s Our Lady.

Excellent and I am quite certain original period painting of St. Francis.  Probably mid-18th century. Heavily stained with candle smoke/incense.  I love it.

Ancient baptistry.  It has drain holes, not sure how they recovered the holy water?

You can see the extreme effects 250+ years of South Texas heat, humidity, and pollution has had on the exterior.  Some portions have had to be buttressed with concrete, but most of the structure is original, unlike the other missions, which are mostly reproductions added back since the 1930s.

I don’t think either the chest/stand or tabernacle are period pieces.  This one was empty.

It is amazing to consider that all of this was built with Indian labor using nothing but simple hand tools, fulcrums, block and tackle, etc,. and that it has survived as well as it has.  The period of neglect was almost total, most of the missions were completely abandoned with Masses only held irregularly, if ever, no permanently assigned staff, no money, no maintenance, and general abandonment for extensive periods of time.  That they exist at all is an amazing testament to the Spanish design and native craftsmanship.  Though she has long been besmirched and derided in the Anglosphere, Catholic Spain continues to give, and generously, to the entire world and especially the Western Hemisphere.

And that is all.  More detail on the other missions.

There were varying levels of crowds at all the missions, with the “main mission” of Mission San Jose being the most consistently crowded.  There are not very many folks at the least modified, liturgically speaking – Mission San Juan Capistrano, my personal favorite.  We’ll hit that one next.  God willing.

Muslims, Incensed by Truth Regarding the False Prophet Mohammad, Cry Bigotry June 6, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in catachesis, Christendom, cultural marxism, Ecumenism, error, fightback, General Catholic, history, Immigration, persecution, Revolution, scandals, Society.
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This is the billboard that is the source of muslim ire around the nation:

Every single statement made on that billboard regarding the false prophet and conceiver of the demonic sect of islam is true.  It is that man’s evil vision, literally an inversion of Christianity, that continues to cause mass chaos around the world on a daily basis, with over 100 non-muslims being killed by muslims for religious reasons DAILY worldwide.

And yes I have in previous posts laid out numerous reasons why Mohammad was a completely false prophet (for one, not a single miracle worked to substantiate his claims of divine inspiration, then there are the satanic verses (of the early Koran, later expunged), where Mohammad fell under satan’s influence/domination, then there are the murderous exhortations throughout the Koran, then……….) and inventer of a demonic, deliberately anti-Christian sect.

But muslims gonna muzzle, so they are shouting bigotry at these stark revelations concerning the founder of the most backward, repressive, totalitarian, murderous major religion on the planet:

A billboard on the east side of Indianapolis is catching the eyes of drivers, along with the ire of local Muslim groups.

You can spot the sign from the southbound lanes of I-465 near the Washington Street exit. It claims to list the “perfect man,” but opponents say it degrades the Muslim prophet Mohammad.

“I was a little disappointed when I saw that,” said Farial Khatri of the Islamic Society of North America.

Opponents say the billboard’s bullet points are meant to disparage the Muslim faith and its primary prophet, Mohammad.

“We’ve seen them in New York and several others cities on billboards as well as other transit ads,” said Kahtri.

There’s no company name or identifying group on the display, but Google “Truthophobes,” a word seen at the bottom of the billboard, and you’ll find a range of websites rife with anti-Muslim messages.

“We do support free speech, but we do realize this is also rooted in bigotry,” said Kahtri.

Other groups say they want to do more than just speak out against the display. The Muslim Alliance of Indiana says it’s planning to raise money to put up its own billboard nearby to spread a message of peace and kindness.

Note, they don’t refute a thing said on the billboard.  They cannot refute the message, so they shoot the messenger.

Regarding this counter-campaign, these typically operate on a similar basis of half-truths and selective revelation.  Signs like the below have appeared in certain parts of Dallas:

These signs are placed in locations that obviously seek to capitalize on any frustrations and indignations held by certain minority communities.  But notice they don’t speak of islam’s treatment of women as little more than chattel.  Nor the rampant abuse of children in countries ruled by sharia.  They’ve learned selective messaging very well from their leftist allies/abettors.

If you’d like to take a stand against creeping sharia in the US, right here in the DFW area, there is going to be a protest against sharia this Saturday June 10 2017 at  10a and runs to 2p.  Location is corner of Abrams and Centennial in Richardson.  More details here.  The protest location is directly across the street from a major mosque.  I think most people park at the “Christian World Church” at the same corner.  It is catty-cornered from the mosque.

About this protest.  Previous editions have involved armed Americans.  The most recent one featured some scuffling against antifa.  That one was weird, the muslims turned against the antifa guys.  But at any rate be prepared for something less sedate than your average prayer vigil outside a Planned Barrenhood or March for Life.  These things can get intense, with lots of in your face shouting and pushing.

I sorely wish I could go.  I’ve been wanting to attend one of these for a while now.  They originated in Irving then spread to Richardson. I’ve also wanted to have a go at antifa. But I have a funeral to attend at noon the same day.

Regarding the muslims, I would be polite but firm that they belong to a horrifically erroneous sect.  Explain their dire need for conversion.  I would not be violent, rhetorically or otherwise.  As to antifa, be as violent as you like.  At the last protest they hired Black Panthers to be their “muscle,” since they so pathetically lack their own organic enforcers.  I would strongly recommend body armor and headgear if you have any.  Also a respirator that filters most inorganic gasses (like CS) and something to protect your eyes.  Antifa love to use the bear spray.

But if  you’re local and planning on going, you’re welcome to the Kek flag if you want to borrow it.  I do hope there is a good turnout, as Benjamin Franklin said, we have a republic, if we can keep it:

h/t reader skeinster

Speaking of Kek, some more greatness to get you fired up for the protest:

The “Other” Miracle at Fatima after the Sun Danced May 24, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, fun, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Our Lady, Saints, sanctity, thanksgiving, Tradition.
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Reader TE sent this to me this past week, it’s not a huge miracle but it’s an interesting follow-up to what was the most widely seen miracle in the history of the Church – at least since Pentecost or when our Blessed Lord walked this earth:

Several years ago Carl Malburg had the privilege of speaking with a woman who was present in Fatima at the Miracle of the Sun. But what she really wanted to tell him about was the second miracle she witnessed there at Fatima shortly after she and everyone saw the sun dancing in the sky, hurling toward earth, then returning to its place in the heavens.

…….While following the usual pattern of going to a diocese then traveling through parishes, hospitals, and nursing homes with that Pilgrim Virgin statue, Malburg happened to be in San Diego in 1997. There, a woman told him her mother was in Fatima and saw the miracle.  [So this was a little more than several years go.  It was more like 20.]

Malburg picks up the story. “The woman said my mother has always wished to be interviewed because she’s always wanted to tell the story. She is still living, 92 years old now. She insists Our Lady is keeping her mind sharp until someone interviews her.” 

The custodian told this daughter he didn’t know Portuguese but would get someone he knew to translate. He chuckled at this point because the woman answered him, “My mother’s lived in America since 1942. She lost all her Portuguese years ago.”

Since this was the first-ever person at the Miracle of the Sun that Malburg encountered, he asked John Haffert to go with him to talk to her. But Haffert told him to go by himself.

“I found out why she thought why she should be interviewed,” he well remembers from when he got there. “She said she was 12, and that she and the other girls — four of them — walked all the way up from the coast to Fatima.”

Malburg continued with the story as the elderly woman told it. “We were children, and we pushed our way through the crowd. We came really close to the center where the apparitions would be there, and we climbed on some rocks and blocked the view of people behind. We could look down and see [everything]. The three children [Lucia, Jacinta, Francisco] would never have gotten there unless carried on the shoulders of some big men who pushed their way through the crowds.”

Malburg didn’t go into detail about what the woman, whose name has disappeared in the annals of time and travels, said about the sun, but that “she wanted to tell me something else. She moved on because there was another miracle not in the books,” he says. [So a woman reveals a heretofore unknown, and quite significant, set of details regarding the unprecedented apparitions and miracles at Fatima, and you don’t bother to get a name?!?  Dude.]

She told him, “A lot of people picked the twigs and leaves of the bushes to take” because they smelled so good, so aromatic. Those went quickly. “But we picked up some pebbles around the bush [by where Our Lady appeared] because they would smell good too.” Malburg was amazed that here it was 80 years later and she told him she had those pebbles in her furniture draw, making her clothes smell fresh even then.

The woman continued her miracle story. “People put their rosaries on the ground. They knew what way the Blessed Mother would face, and they put their rosaries out there in front of the place. [The pile of] rosaries were shaped like a cross. [After the apparition] There were so many that when everybody went to get their rosaries, they were all tangled up. And they were trying to find the right rosary.

“The men had the three children up on their shoulders again,” she said. Malburg adds, “Otherwise they would be buffeted and smothered — I knew that for a fact.” The woman told him about the girl’s new dresses and people pulling pieces of the lace around them. Malburg also knew about that.

“It was all adding up except the rosaries,” he says. “Then she said, One of the children saw the people had the rosaries all tangled. Then the children slid down from the shoulders, took a handful of [the tangled] rosaries and just passed them out. None were tangled! And everybody got the right rosary! We watched that happen!” she told Malburg, still in amazement.

The woman had waited to tell someone who someday in her lifetime was going to interview her that story about what she and her friends witnessed with the pile of tangled rosaries miraculously untangled, and each one immediately given to the right owner without the seer knowing who in that crowd owned which one.

“My wife and I got goosebumps listening to that,” Malburg recalls.

He immediately asked Haffert, “Are you aware people laid their rosaries in the mud hoping to get a blessing on them?” No one ever told him that, he answered.

“This lady told me a lot of rosaries were laid around the bush,” Malburg repeated, and she said “rosaries were all tangled up. She insisted they [she and her friends] were standing on the rocks, and saw the children pick the rosaries up and hand them out blindly, and everyone got their right rosary.”

Haffert answered him, “Why would you doubt it?”

About 10 years later Malburg came across a magazine article in Portugal that verified this miracle. “This truly was one of the highlights,” he says of the story of the second, little-known miracle at Fatima right after the sun danced in the sky. 

As I said, not exactly a huge miracle, but interesting.  Have you ever heard of this before?

Early Flighline Friday: DeHavilland Vampire Obliterates Runway at Halfpenny Green May 3, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in error, Flightline Friday, fun, history, non squitur, silliness, Society, technology.
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Halfpenny Green being a former WWII airfield still used for private and commercial aviation. Apparently the runway surface was not jet rated because this WWII-vintage DeHavilland Vampire ripped it to shreds:

Good grief. That exhaust is really close to the ground, but the Goblin engine powering the Vampire only made 3400 pounds of thrust.  The same as a Westinghouse J34.  Are they related?  Maybe so, many early US jet designs were based on British originals, and both are relatively rare centrifugal flow units.

I’ve never seen the like before.