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Our Lady of Good Success Warned (and reassured) Us About This Sin-nod October 21, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, episcopate, fightback, Francis, General Catholic, history, Our Lady, Restoration, Revolution, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition.
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A nice and brief cartoon via reader TT, which reminds us that Our Blessed Mother has prophesied and warned of these days, but also given us reassurance as to the ultimate outcome of this war for the soul of Holy Mother Church:

Excellent Video Series on Antonio Salazar September 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, history, Restoration, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Antonio de Oliveira Salazar was the leader, some would say dictator, of Portugal from 1934 until his death in 1968.  Unlike Franco’s Spain, his Catholic corporatist Estado Novo (New State) survived him by several years, finally being wrecked by a coup of mid-grade hard leftist officers of Portugal’s military in 1974.

Salazar and the Estado Novo offer an interesting, and much more Catholic, alternative to what the predominant culture tells us are possible viable forms of government since the mid-20th century – hard leftism or liberal/libertine capitalism.  I’ve never been fully on board with such corporatist/distributist economic systems as outlined by Chesterton and Belloc (among many others) in the first half of the 20th century, as they seemed a bit too utopian to be practical.  But Salazar’s Portugal probably came the closest of any deliberately Catholic state (deliberate in the sense of being constructed to comport as closely as possible to the Church’s social and general magisterial beliefs up to that point in time) in achieving a reasonable mean – being Catholic, but also relatively prosperous, relatively free, and relatively non-tyrannical.  Some of my primary complaints against distributism is that it seemed a fine system for the late 18th century, but probably not too well suited for the 21st century.  Salazar’s Portugal serves as probably the best argument against that complaint.

Regarding a tyrannical state, Salazar’s Portugal was much less violent, as a government, than was the corollary next door in Franco’s Spain.  Of course, the Estado Novo had the incalculable benefit of not being founded in the midst of a brutal civil war.  Even still, however, there was a very powerful leftist faction in Portugal, which had held power several times in the decades preceding 1934, and remained a serious threat through much of Salazar’s time in power.  However, by judicously practicing Catholic Doctrine, the Salazar regime only put about 5 souls to death throughout it’s nearly 40  year existence – a far cry from the tens of thousands that died, or were killed, in Spain, even after the end of the Spanish Civil War.  Now, I’m quite sympathetic to Franco’s government and think its hand was forced by the radical, unyielding leftists it had to deal with – these leftists started the Civl War by attacking the Catholic Faith and massacring hundreds of priests and religious – but it is still an impressive achievement.  Salazar had very nearly as divided and fractious a country to manage as did Franco, but managed to do so with far less bloodshed.

Unfortunately, the quite-detailed video series I post below is not complete.  It only goes until about World War II.  Many of Salazar’s greatest social achievements – the economic rebuilding of Portugal along Catholic corporatist lines – had to wait until after World War II.  The author of the series promises that some new uploads will be coming this fall and winter – I will be sure to share those when they become available.

For now, you can learn a great deal about an important, but deliberately forgotten, leader on the world stage for much of the 20th century.  I say he was deliberately forgotten, because Salazar’s Portugal, like (to varying degrees) Franco’s Spain, and Dolfuss’ and Schussnigg’s Austria, and a few other locales, truly do serve as contrary examples to what we are told was the “only sane choice” in the “inevitable” liberal capitalist state.  Not just contrary examples, but examples that, in many ways, are more just, more moral, and – it can be argued – much  more conducive to the good of souls than the  decaying, decadent, corrupt states we find ourselves in throughout the West today.  In terms of tyranny, how many people does the United States kill each year, either here at home or abroad?  I’m no opponent of the death penalty, but it does make for an illuminating contrast.

I hope you enjoy these videos as much as I have.  Since these videos are difficult to find on Youtube, and since, for some reason, many do not show up on the channel’s playlist, I post them all below.  I knew comparitively little about Salazar’s Portugal before watching these, and most of what I had learned was harshly critical, so these videos will hopefully prove enlightening for you as well.  I know you’ll think, there’s too many, it’ll take too long, history is boooring!!!  Do yourself a favor and watch these, at one sitting or over several months, I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised, especially if you have any interest in Church history:

 

Watch Michael Davies, William F. Buckley, and Malachi Martin Completely Dismantle Post-Conciliar Amchurch August 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, General Catholic, history, Latin Mass, Restoration, Revolution, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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The video below was recorded in 1980.  Michael Davies, God rest his soul, was a young and very charismatic man who had already written several books defending Archbishop Lefebvre and exposing the protestantizing changes in the Mass.  He had also developed ample evidence that the changes were deliberately made to change the belief and practice of believing Catholics in order to turn the Catholic Church into something other than the entity Christ founded our Holy Mother to be.

That evidence comes to the fore repeatedly as a certain Father Joseph Champlin repeatedly tries, in true post-concliar fashion, to so parse and muddy the Faith that not even licentiates in sacred theology could make heads or tails of what the Church was supposed to believe, what the current pope was promoting, or how the Church fell into the general post-conciliar mess.  Certainly it is true that there were a number of factors at work in, for instance, the total collapse in vocations in historically Catholic/Christian countries (lumping the US in that group for convenience), but to pretend that the loss of 50,000 priests and nearly 100,000 religious in a mere 10 years after the close of Vatican II had nothing, or very little, to do with the massive changes imposed on the Faith in the wake of that council is laughable, as Davies and Buckley repeatedly demonstrate. Fr. Champlin, who was part of the disastrously liberal Dioceses of Rochester and Syracuse in New York, repeatedly had to engage in what I found to be deliberate obfuscation and attempts to so parse matters of theology that virtually no one could rightly claim to know what the Church believed, at least beyond what the most recent pope had declared.  He had to do this because both the Council and the post-conciliar popes at various times and places made declarations in open conflict with the well defined, long-declared solemn Doctrine of the Faith.

This was a regular modernist ruse, reducing the Faith to meaningless or practical indeciperable nonsense that no lay person could hope to comprehend, in stark contrast to the clear belief of the pre-conciliar Church.

Anyway the debate is well worth your time and is a helpful time capsule in understanding how the battle over the mind and soul of the Church was fought in its early days. I would say that traditional critiques of the Council, and more particularly, that false “spirit” that came in its wake, have only sharpened and improved since then.

It is also interesting to point out how even at this point – more than 10 years after the implementation of the Novus Ordo – a large majority of Catholics polled indicated their preference in returning to the Mass of the ages.

Flightline Friday: Charlie Duke Took Country Music to the Moon July 19, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Flightline Friday, fun, history, Society, technology, true leadership.
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During these celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 flight, here’s a quick post about the man who was the CAPCOM during the famous landing of Lunar Module #5 “Eagle” at Tranquilty Base, Apollo 16 LMP Charlie Duke.  Charlie Duke was always one of the most affable and likable of astronauts, and he still is today.  He is a convicted protestant, but has some very interesting things to say about evolution in the final video.  I love what he wore to the 50th anniversary gala of the Apollo 11 landings at the Reagan Library two nights ago:

Captain Duke lives in the New Braunfels area.  Love the cumberbund and tie.

Robert Earl Keen and Randy Rogers recorded this song about Charlie Duke, which is a true story, as is the bit from Merle Haggard and Dolly Parton at the end. That was actually part of a tape that Charlie Duke took with him on the Apollo 16 flight, which consisted of music recorded by huge country artists specifically for Duke on that flight.  Others that contributed were Buck Owens, Porter Waggoner, and Jerry Reed:
Here’s a recent interview with Charlie, see his comments about evolution at 4:20.  He is quite right in noting that evolution is taught as a religion, but I disagree a bit that there is no ultimate proof of God.  I believe the great Doctors of the Church have sufficiently established that proof.  In fact, I would argue there is much, much more evidence in favor of both the existence of God and the Biblical creation story, than there is of Darwin’s deliberately anti-Christian conception of evolution of the species. Nevertheless, it’s good to hear:
Dominus vobiscum!

SSPX to Build Huge New Parish in St. Mary’s, Kansas July 14, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Latin Mass, Liturgy, Restoration, SSPX, Tradition.
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Two things immediately come to mind after viewing this video on Rorate Caeli – 1. I’ll have to check this place out, I’ve never been to St. Mary’s, and 2., St. Mary’s is way, way bigger than Mater Dei.  6 Masses a day with one in a gymnasium seating what looks like close to 600 people, the video sort of vaguely mentions 4000 people attending St. Mary’s.  I don’t know if that means every Sunday, but with Mater Dei averaging about 1500 on a Sunday St. Mary’s is much larger.  And, I am not surprised, it is in a sense SSPX-town USA, and has been around 13 or 31  years longer than the FSSP parish in the Dallas Diocese.  I had long suspected that if there was a TLM parish with higher attendance on Sunday than Mater Dei, it would be St. Mary’s.

Well, God bless them, and may He bless this work. Whatever one thinks of the SSPX – and I for one am very grateful for Archbishop Lefebvre and the priestly society he started and maintained, since without it the TLM and the entire traditional practice of the Faith would probably have been expunged from the Church – this is a huge step forward for the entire traditional movement. This is a cathedral-class building being built for the sole use of the Traditional Latin Mass and the traditional practice of the Faith.  It’s a huge undertaking and requires at least $30 million (construction budgets have a tendency to go up as construction advances, but this crew looks like they are really focused on keeping a lid on expenses).  And, I must say, it looks like this new church when built will be architecturally and artistically significant.  I do pray it has outstanding stained glass and other aspects of liturgical art – there is a great deal available on the market these days, with so many ancient and beautiful churches being razed in Europe and parts of the US.

It looks less and less likely that we will have anything similar (certainly not on such a scale) locally.  The funding just isn’t there.  Well, a new church will happen in God’s good time.  If you feel inspired to help bring a substantial new traditional Catholic parish to fruition, you can donate here.

Solemn Vespers of the Dead for the Centenary of the Conclusion of WWI at UD Nov 6 November 5, 2018

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, Dallas Diocese, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Latin Mass, Liturgy, Tradition.
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I hope I can attend this tomorrow night.  Solemn Vespers for the Dead in the traditional Rite will be offered Nov 6 on the campus of the University of Dallas at 7:30 pm at the Church of the Incarnation.  All details below:

Check out the generous confession times at the Church of the Incarnation, too – 45 minutes a day or more Mon, Wed, Fri, and Sat.

I heard the Catholic Action for Faith and Family Conference was a big success.  My daughter was there yesterday to sing in the schola for the solemn pontifical low Mass Cardinal Burke offered on Sunday morning.  Many other events over the weekend were sparsely attended because so many other folks were off at the big conference at the Irving convention center.  Bishop Burns was there.  I’ve heard some other good things about Bishop Burns in the last several days on other fronts.  Even though he is closely associated with the sad triad of Wuerl/McCarrick/Farrell he seems cut from a bit different cloth.

But the opening of the diocesan records on priest boy rape is a nothingburger.  It’s all been carefully checked over in advance but there may be a few belated revelations.

All that aside, I have a small but growing pious hope that in Bishop Burns Dallas has finally gotten someone a bit virtuous as bishop.

Flightline Friday: The Awesome A-7 April 13, 2018

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, Flightline Friday, fun, history, non squitur, silliness, technology.
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For nearly 40 years, my current house would have been very nearly directly under the flight path for Naval Air Station Dallas and the co-located Vought/LTV plant.  Thus, from 1955 to the early 90s, Vought F-8s and later A-7s would have been in the air most every day, flying over my home (OK, the home didn’t exist for most of that time, but you get the point).  Of course, by the time we moved into that house Navy Dallas was closed and Vought was out of the prime contractor business, no longer building whole airplanes, but that’s how it goes.

At any rate the A-7 was the result of a quickie project to build a replacement for the excellent Douglas A-4 Skyhawk, intending to greatly increase the range/payload capability of US Navy light attack assets.  The project was a hallmark of the US aerospace industry at that time, roughly showcasing an industry at its historic peak, resulting in a program that went from conception to flying hardware in just about 4 years.  Heck, they can’t even get half the specs for a bomb written in 4 years today, let alone those for a whole airplane.  Vought responded to the Navy’s request for a new Light Attack aircraft – the VAL competition – with a modified version of its epochal F-8 Crusader fighter, basically a shortened F-8 with a wing modified to carry heavy payloads.  Vought won that competition, and between December 1964 and early 1967 crafted the A-7A.  This aircraft represented a quantum leap not in speed, because it wasn’t very fast, but in accuracy.  The A-7 was the most accurate tactical bombing platform in US service until the introduction of the F-16 in 1978.  Especially in its Air Force A-7D variant and subsequent US Navy E model copy of the D, the A-7 set radically improved standards in terms of bombing accuracy and range/payload capability, being able to carry the same payload as the A-4 twice as far, or twice the payload the same distance.

Prior to the A-7s arrival in Southeast Asia, virtually every Air Force tactical mission “up north,” whether launched from Thailand or South Vietnam, required air-to-air refueling.  Even the long-legged F-105 required refueling after taking off with a heavy bomb load.  As the first video below indicates, however, the A-7 was able to fly almost all missions over North Vietnam, with a heavy payload of about 9000 pounds of ordinance, pylons, and ammo, without air-to-air refueling.  Now refueling was still pretty frequently done, but more to give the A-7 ridiculous loiter time up North – often over 2 hours – than because of basic necessity.  Navy A-7s, operating much closer to their targets, virtually never required refueling.

The A-7 got its impressive accuracy through a combination of some of the first digital computers, embedded and computerized navigation systems (INS, Doppler, and a very accurate attack radar), and newly developed software algorithms that determined, electronically, a continuously computed impact point (CCIP) means of bombing that was a radical advance for its time.  Later perfected to a much greater degree in the F-16 and F-18, the A-7’s CCIP system improved basic bomb-dropping accuracy by more than a factor of ten, from hundreds of yards down to about 20-30 yards, average mean miss distance.  The second video, an absolute gift of an upload of a film from the old British firm of Elliot, which built some of the very first Heads Up Displays ever made, subsequently installed in the A-7D and E.  Man how some like minded enthusiasts and I would have practically wept for joy to have seen truly excellent footage like this, showing exactly how complex, innovative systems were used tactically, 20 or 30 years ago.  Great stuff.

I’m out for the weekend.  Sorry for lack of posts, it was one of those weeks.  Long live the memory of the great Vought Aircraft and its many excellent products!  Built just about 5 miles from my home, they were in every respect Great Planes:

Now that the “multirole” is cheaper experiment has been tried and quite possibly proven a bad concept – especially when the roles are far too numerous and diverse – perhaps it’s time to return to some lower cost single mission types, for the vital roles like CAS and BAI?  That is to say, Air Force and Navy jocks, just because it doesn’t have an “F” in front of its name doesn’t mean it’s second rate!  Bomber pilots may make history, fighter pilots may make movies, but attack pilots make the boots on the ground very, very happy.

So How Would You Like This For a Pope? April 6, 2018

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, Art and Architecture, General Catholic, history, Papa, Tradition.
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The HBO one season uncompleted series “The New Pope” ran a little over a year ago.  It’s got an interesting premise – an ultra-conservative, highly traditional young American gets elected pope (choosing the name Pius XIII) by a confab of corrupt cardinals who think he will be a mere figurehead.  There is much Machiavellian drama in little bits of the series I’ve seen, including numerous attempts by the corruptocrats in the Curia to get some dirt on the new pope and thus compromise and control him.  This culminates in a young woman trying quite hard to seduce the pope, and failing.

At any rate, at some point in the series, the young pope who has held himself aloof not only from the world (refusing to perform public homilies or activities of any kind, or even to show his face) but even from the Curia, finally holds a little meeting with the cardinals, wherein he lays out his new program for the Church.  In this, you could say, he proposes to turn the post-conciliar ethos on its head and set the Church on a radical new, but in many ways a very old, course.

The new pope is very mysterious to all, even, perhaps, to himself.  He posits a return to Tradition and is loved by all the traditional priests, who form a sort of new coterie around the pope displacing parts of the existing bureaucracy.  Most of these priests are quite young and devout, and make a marked contrast to the many corrupt bureaucrats occupying positions of power.  Also dealt with are the infestation of sodomites deep into the heart of the Church.

The pope intends to use his aloofness, the mystery surrounding him, and his youth and physical attractiveness to the benefit of himself and the Church. There are intimations that he is saintly and can work miracles, and intimations that he might be insane.  Or, perhaps, his mental prowess and sanctity cause him to behave in ways that people cannot comprehend?

Note the return of the sede gestatoria, fanon, and a sort of papal tiara, though one not nearly so grand as the old photos indicate.

Not sure if anyone’s seen this series, but late on a Friday afternoon when I have almost no time to post, I thought I’d give at least a little bit of Hollywood’s version of what a hardcore trad pope might mean.  Let me know what you think from this little bit, and anything else  you’ve watched.

Should I say, this guy looks positively dreamy compared to the current occupant?  He sounds perhaps a bit severe and unyielding but after 50+ years of yielding to everyone and everything, perhaps that’s not such a bad thing? I can imagine such a pope as this might wind up like John Paul I.

I don’t think popes ever rode in the sede gestatoria standing like that.

Some Wonderful Bits of Catholic Culture April 4, 2018

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, Ecumenism, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Latin Mass, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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I’ve found a “new” channel on  Youtube called Holy Faith TV.  It’s not that new, it’s been around almost a  year, but it’s new to me.

They’ve got a lot of great traditional Catholic content and some really outstanding history.  How about this incredible color video of Venerable Pius XII:

And here is a video from what was then a mainstream educational film company on the jubilee year of 1950.  Can you imagine Scholastic doing a reverential and respectful video on the Church today?  How much, and how much for the worse, our society has changed since then.

“…….here lies a spiritual power that no godless philosophy may hope to vanquish.”  Take it to heart, leftists!

If an audience featuring Pius XII wasn’t good enough, how about Mass from 1948, offered in St. Peter’s. Sadly it is in black and white:

And here you go, marking the end of glory and the beginning of the auto-demolition of the Faith, a film on the death of Pius XII and coronation of John XXIII, before the fanon and sede gestatoria were scrapped by John’s successor:

 

It’s not all from the 50s.  There is content dating at least back to Saint Pius X. And some of it is more modern commentary, from a wide diversity of sources, from people known well to this blog like Fr. Michael Rodriguez and Bishop Athanasius Schneider, to more esoteric sources.  I can’t say I’ve watched much of the commentary, but as for the historical stuff, I love it.  So much more like that!

Apparently Youtube contains just part of the content, there is a website that ostensibly has more but I haven’t really had time to check it out.  Perhaps you will, and if you do, feel free to share anything of interest you may find!

As always, of course my happiness at finding this channel is not necessarily an endorsement of everything on it.  But I think there is quite a bit good to find there.

And it’s not all strictly Catholic.  There’s actually quite a bit from the Orthodox Church on the channel.  For an example, here is Patriarch Kirill, primate of the Russian Orthodox Church, taking on the cultural masters in a way the last six popes have generally failed to do, with occasional exceptions from John Paul II and Benedict.  In fact, he proclaims a truth that is readily apparent to most believing Christians of any Church, sect, or stripe: godless elites want to destroy Christianity:

Lady Lex and Planes in Remarkable Shape after 76 Years at the Cold, Dark Bottom of the Coral Sea March 6, 2018

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, Flightline Friday, foolishness, fun, history, non squitur, silliness, Society.
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Billionaire Paul Allen, one of the founders of Microsoft, has spent some of his remarkable fortune on deep sea expeditions, finding old wrecks of historical value. Last year his crew found the USS Indianapolis, sunk after delivering the atomic bomb components to Tinian with most of her crew killed by sharks waiting for rescue.  He has also found the massive IJN battleship Musashi.

Just a few days ago, his research team found USS Lexington, CV-2, sunk during the Battle of Coral Sea by the US after she suffered catastrophic explosions from gasoline leaks after being hit by Japanese bombs.  The ship, and especially the aircraft, were in remarkably good shape.  Even the squadron emblems from “Fighting Three” (VF-3) were still plain as day, as were the dark grey/light grey finish, national markings (including the quickly dropped “meatball” in the star that it was feared would be confused with a similar meatball used on Japanese planes as their rising sun motif), kill markings, etc.  Structurally the planes don’t look as bad as one might think after three quarters of a century in the muck and gloom of the deep, deep ocean. In fact they look almost good enough to try to raise and refurbish for museum display.  What a historical coup that would be.

Lexington was part of the “first team” of pre-war, often career sailors and airmen who first held the line, and then very quickly turned the tables on the Japanese before massive American production of men and material made the War in the Pacific all but a foregone conclusion.

Totally non sequitur to this blog but ho boy I hope they post a lot more video and pics of this:

Wrecked Douglas TBD Devastator of Torpedo Three (VT-3)

That Felix the Cat symbol is famous and dates back to the 1920s in naval aviation.  It is still used today by VFA-31 “Tomcatters”