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Matt: Cardinal Burke Did Not “Betray” Traditional Movement with SSPX Comments October 4, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, episcopate, error, General Catholic, Latin Mass, Restoration, sadness, SSPX, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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If you’re fortunate,  you’ve probably been spared the drama over some comments Cardinal Burke made at a conference back in June or July regarding the SSPX.  When asked specifically whether lay Catholics should or could attend an SSPX parish, Cardinal Burke said (in main point) they were schismatic, and that while their Masses were valid they were not licit and should be avoided.  This is the 100% mainstream conservative opinion in the Church, and the one that was espoused by the Pope Emeritus.

Some folks took grave exception to this commentary and opined that Cardinal Burke had somehow exposed himself as a true modernist at heart, or that he had failed the traditional movement, or that he is now rather suspect and not a good friend of traditional Catholics.

I think Michael Matt sums up my sentiments more or less exactly.  I am not surprised at what Cardinal Burke said in the slightest.  As I said, it’s pretty much the default position of the hierarchical Church, what these men in positions of power are taught and expected to say.  This doesn’t make Cardinal Burke a bad person or somehow a turncoat.  The good things he has done remain.  He remains the chief opponent of Francis in the ecclesiastical hierarchy, the author of the Dubia, and a very good friend of the Traditional Latin Mass.  But, like all of us, he’s far from perfect, and probably does not, nor ever will, align with our every desire as a perfect Catholic prelate (we all know there has only ever been one perfect prelate, and ever will be – Marcel Lefebvre).

Personally, I was neither exercised by the cardinal’s comments, nor by the reaction.  In fact, I completely expected the reaction.  If Matt’s video below did not so well accord with my own views and provide sensible counsel, I would not have covered the matter at all.  I don’t want to see the comments turn into one of those endless SSPX/anti-SSPX imbroglios.  They are boring and have already been done to death 1000 times over.  You are welcome to your opinion and to express it, but if the tete a tete’s get to extensive and descend into incivility I will terminate the comments (but not take any action against particular commenters, especially those who have been around a long time).  Experience has taught that anything touching on the SSPX tends to lead to great passions on all sides.  Let’s try to keep things cool.

I think Matt’s video could be easily summed up as: don’t throw the baby out with the bath water.  Sure, Cardinal Burke may have said something you or I or we don’t like, or wish he had said another way, but he does a great deal of good at the same time.

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Correctio Filialis Signature List Grows, but Still Few Traditional Priests….. October 4, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Basics, different religion, Father Rodriguez, fightback, Francis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, persecution, priests, secularism, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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……..and zero from the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter, that I can tell.

Fr. Michael Rodriguez was added with the latest update of signatories from Monday.  I have a hope that the organizers of the Correctio Filialis will reach out to some other priests I suggested.  Then we might see some Fraternity priests on the list, if they have the gumption to sign.

One or two additional FSSPX priests signed.  That’s fine, but there seems little broad-based movement there to endorse this filial correction.

I can certainly imagine some reasons why traditional priests would not want to sign. Indeed, there may exist directives in their orders not to do so.

But I pray the list of signatories will explode from far beyond the current 219 (which is wonderful and a great blessing in and of itself, but more would be far better).  From my standpoint – and I’m sure there would be repercussions I would not like – every single traditional priest should sign this filial correction.  But Catholic moral behavior is not governed strictly by consequences.  If something is right and just and even a moral imperative to perform (which I would argue, given the threat posed by the errors emanating from this pontificate and the potential for far worse in the future, this is a moral imperative), it must be performed, the consequences be damned.  At least, that’s what I always hear when I am told I have to be obedient to the post-conciliar establishment, no matter how disastrous the result of that obedience has been.

Surely, that argument cuts both ways?  Or was it always just about expedience?

Here is a golden opportunity for tradition-loving priests to take a concrete action against the continued rape of Holy Mother Church and possibly towards a restoration of same………sign the @#$%&*!! petition.  Or never bemoan the state of the Church again? (or, for tender ears, I could say it nicer: if you do not, how can you expect the laity to listen to  your later complaints regarding the increasingly sad state of the Church?).

And yes, your prudential reasons for not signing have been considered and found wanting.  Tantrumstompo has spoken.

Rant concluded……….maybe.  No don’t watch that movie.

Defining the Post-Conciliar Ethos in a Single Tweet October 2, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Christendom, cultural marxism, different religion, Father Rodriguez, Francis, General Catholic, horror, Latin Mass, Restoration, Revolution, scandals, secularism, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition.
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So helpful for Massimo Fagglioli to help us out, showing us just what the “new springtime of endless new pentecosts infinitely better than the first” crowd believe:

Fagglioli – yes, I know – is a prominent adherent to, and advocate for, the “Bologna School,” the primary remaining intellectual force behind the radical reinvention of the Church as a man-made construct post-VII.  Think Cardinal Martini, Yves Congar, and you get the picture.

“Not Catholic anymore.”  The dream being, of course – and it is proudly proclaimed by some of Francis’ most intimate associates – to so radically change the Church that “reform” or, more properly, restoration, is impossible.

Even the logic behind that kind of statement tells us that holders of this view believe the Church is a human, rather than a Divine, construct.  As the good old Jewish Pharisee Gamaliel (reputed to be St. Paul’s teacher before his conversion) says in Acts of the Apostles: if this thing be of God, we cannot destroy it and we will war against God, but if it be of men, it will die out of its own.

Fagglioli, “Tucho” Fernandez, Tagle, Maradaiga-Rodriguez – they proclaim very loudly they view the Church as a man-made construct, to be bent and shaped into any image they see fit (as good leftists would – and being good leftists, they naturally assume that THEY, and only they, are smart enough, caring enough, and just plain good enough to deserve, by right, the role of Church-redefiner).

Note also the admission that the Mass is the fulcrum around which this revolution has been worked, and it is also the means by which the Restoration will take place.  For we know, contra so much of the hierarchical, institutional Church these days, that the Church, our Holy Mother, is ultimately the creation of God and that His Will shall be done, no matter how hard it may be to see that Will at this time.

I have become totally convinced that the best, the only way by which the Church will be restored is through the mass re-adoption of the Mass of St. Pius V and all the traditional rites of the Sacraments.  It was no mistake at all that the revolutionaries at VII, contrary to the established agenda, chose to act on the revolution against the Liturgy first.  They knew if they could remake the Liturgy into a pseudo-protestant, modernist-infused hootenanny then everything else would be not just wide open, but a matter of time.

So the spread of the TLM should be our highest priority, a sentiment echoed by the good Rodriguez brothers, one a priest, one a layman, speaking at the recent Fatima Center conference:

 

The TLM Demands More and Delivers More…… September 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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……..much, much more!

Before I begin excerpting Dr. Peter Kwasniewski’s excellent post comparing the TLM, as predominately offered today (very well and reverently), and the Novus Ordo, as predominately offered today (poorly), I will point out, as Dr. K does, that there are rare examples of the Novus Ordo, offered in Latin, that offer many of the same benefits as does the TLM (while making many of the same “demands,” as well).  I have been blessed to assist at Novus Ordos offered in Latin that feature the Asperges and with the priest facing the tabernacle, speaking lowly in Latin during the consecration and with bells and smells lifted from the TLM, and both my family and I derived great spiritual fruit from this.  You could easily say the NO in Latin was a quite beneficial and necessary step for us on the way to the TLM.

However, while I don’t wish to be accused of “typical” Trad pridefulness, I do believe that, even when offered as beautifully and reverently as possible, the Novus Ordo in Latin does not quite reach the standard of the TLM in terms of fruitfulness for souls and benefits not only for the life of the Church, but for the world at large.  There were simply too many changes.  Even the Canon was not left untouched, and most sadly, the very words of the Consecration.  Also less beneficial were the massive changes to the readings, and especially the deliberate excision of “problematic” parts of Scripture, the ones that speak of condemnation, blasphemy, even damnation, or – horror of horrors – which point to the Church as the unique body instituted by God for salvation.

But, having said that, if Francis or some other evil force were to somehow abrogate the TLM tomorrow and get all the bishops and priests to go along – if the TLM disappeared – I could probably get by without much ill effect on the best NO in Latin I ever experienced, one that even, perhaps against the “rules,” but of enormous benefit for souls, lifted a few bits of the TLM back into the NO – like the Canon and consecration (yes, that happened).  This assumes basically the situation I encountered, that of a fully orthodox priest who desperately desired to offer the TLM but was barred by diocesan regulations – though I understand he is back to offering Mass ad orientem again, now that a certain Cardinal who stopped him from doing so is out of this diocese.

At any rate, to portions of Kwasniewski’s post, about what the TLM demands, but, even more, what it delivers:

We have probably all met people who are thinking of attending the traditional Latin Mass on a regular basis and who, when they actually start going, are struck by how much extra effort it costs. Perhaps we ourselves once felt the same way.

For starters, you are expected to kneel for long stretches of time. There is a lot of silence to get used to (and, if you are a parent, to keep your children relatively quiet in). Sometimes there are lengthy readings, chants, or prayers that may test your patience and stretch to the limit your capacity for meditation. You might be confused about what words the priest or the schola is saying or singing, because the hand missal you picked up from a bookcase in the foyer is over a thousand pages long, and you haven’t figured out how to use it yet. So much is strange, even overwhelming; sometimes it seems random. And the whole of a High Mass might last for an hour and a half or even longer, depending on the solemnity of the rite or the volubility of the preacher. Everyone dresses up more; women are expected to wear veils; the atmosphere is more serious. An eager devotee might volunteer the information that Catholics who come to Mass here often try to observe either the three-hour Eucharistic fast or the fast from midnight. The usus antiquior is premised on asceticism and a reverential beauty in no hurry to be done. This Mass demands a lot of you and your family, physically, mentally, emotionally, spiritually. Is it worth the effort?

On the other hand, going to the Novus Ordo can be such a breeze………[I’ll skip the explanation.  He means, a breeze, in the sense of making few demands in terms of personal effort]

[Onto the benefits of the TLM]……First, you come to realize that even after years of attending the Novus Ordo, you had not developed much of a “liturgical interior life”—that is, the ability to rest in the mysteries shining forth in the Mass, to absorb the prayers or Scripture texts, to connect deeply with the Real Presence of the Savior. The usus antiquior makes ample room for the growth of the spiritual life at the pace and in the way most suited to each individual, offering many helps or “handles” for penetrating into the marvels of the Eucharist and of the Church’s liturgical year. It gives you a lot more to pray about and a lot more room to pray in.

After experiencing this for a while, it can be like a shower with ice-cold water to return to the Novus Ordo and discover that it is pretty much a non-stop extroverted exchange from start to finish, with now the priest speaking, now the congregation, always “something doing,” and never, or rarely ever, an expanse for resting, absorbing, connecting. Even though the classical liturgy has a lot more going on in its minutiae, it operates on broader lines at a more leisurely pace—an inheritance from the ancient Mediterranean world and the monastery-rich Middle Ages……..

………..Second, at the traditional Mass you start to notice a plethora of little things that serve as windows to the infinite and eternal: the priest kissing the altar time and again; the bowing of heads at certain phrases in the Gloria or the Credo; many signs of the cross made at significant moments; the clink of thurible chains and floating clouds of sweet smoke; the subdeacon holding the paten under the humeral veil; the pregnant silence of the Canon; the lifting of the chasuble at the elevations; the many ringings of bells; the corps of servers with straight backs and folded hands; the touching of sacred vessels and of Christ’s holy Body by ordained ministers alone…. All these little things (and the list could go on) are so many signs or calls of love from God, who is drawing us with exquisite gentleness into the depths of His mystery, preparing us for our beatitude with Him. He would never wish to give us anything less than the fullness of the orthodox Faith, in the fullness of its sacral expression.

(“Now wait a minute,” you may say; “can we not sometimes find the same little things in the Novus Ordo, too?” Yes, you might find some of them, on a good day, if you’re lucky.[1] The problem is that they rarely appear in that context, and when they do, it is with the slightly awkward feel of strangers who have arrived at a casual party vastly over-dressed. [There is something to this.  I don’t mean to insult anyone’s preferences, but even at the very best Latin NO there was a little sense that all the pomp and reverence was something of an affectation – and at the very worst it was obvious.The NO was intended to be a Mass in the vernacular, and offering it in Latin comes across, at times, a bit false.]……..

………Third, by immersing oneself in the ancient Roman liturgy, one’s identity as a Catholic, and the content of Catholicism, becomes thicker and richer. With the aid of good illustrated books, sound catechesis at home, and patient parenting, your children will have the opportunity to become more fully Catholic, too, and their unspoken sense of the reality of the Faith, the powerful reality of the things we say we believe (such as the Real Presence of Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament), will grow. This, in itself, is worth all that it takes to get to the traditional Mass: children will be confronted again and again with unequivocal signs of the holiness of God, the dignity of priests, the set-apart sacredness of the sanctuary, the altar as a place of sacrifice, and the special privilege of receiving the Lord from the anointed hands of His minister, as we kneel along the altar rail to receive the precious Body of Jesus. [This is something I do see: it’s not universal, but there is frequently a connection children make to the TLM that I’ve simply never seen in the NO of any stripe, no matter how good.  You will see little boys literally playing priest at home, asking their moms to make them little chasubles to wear.  Their brothers will help “assist” at the play mass, and sisters will be the congregation.  Children start paying better attention to Mass at a younger age, in my experience, too.]

The traditional liturgy is like the old catechism writ large, in vivid characters, imprinting fundamental truths on the souls of those who attend it—truths for which there is little obvious support in the Novus Ordo, with its democratic permeable barriers that allow laypeople and clergy to mix roles and functions, its positioning of the priest versus populum as a “presider” at a social event, its treatment of the altar as a table, its dearth of signs and symbols to catch hold of and elevate the mind, its nearly institutionalized use of substandard church music, its lack of intrinsic silence, its encouragement of informal attitudes, and much else besides.  If we want to avoid all this, we must not dither and second-guess. We must make up our minds to attend the Church’s traditional liturgy, which enshrines the totality of Catholic dogma and responds to man’s deepest religious needs. Whatever our vocation is, whatever our state in life, whatever the state of our soul, we stand to receive a treasure infinitely greater than any sacrifice we might make in order to obtain it. If we are parents with children, we are greatly increasing the possibility that God may give our families the greatest gift after the Most Holy Eucharist, namely, a vocation to priestly or religious life—a vocation that the traditional liturgy awakens in a disproportionate number of its adherents. [So true – the number of vocations from TLMs compared to Novus Ordo is exponentially higher – by percentage of souls attending who follow their vocation.]

An awakening to the interior life; the finding of dozens of new paths to the knowledge and love of God; the enrichment of one’s identity and faith as a Catholic—this is what the extra effort of attending the traditional Mass wins for you. Is it worth it? Can we say that this is a “reasonable” demand for modern people?

Maybe that is the wrong question to ask, for the truth is better than we expect or deserve. The tradition makes foolish, unreasonable demands because it aims not at our comfort but at our divinization. Its aims at passion, death, resurrection, and ascension, and efficaciously accomplishes them. We would do well to follow this narrow way that leads to abundant life.

Thanks to MFG for the link.

I know a few folks who tried the TLM once or twice and did not feel comfortable. It is an enormous change.  But it is so very much worth the effort.  And if you’ve had a bad experience, if you felt lost or not welcomed enough, please, try again.  Locally, at any rate, there are strong efforts underway to try to make newcomers feel as welcome and involved as possible.  Especially if you go to the 9am High Mass on Sunday.

For those who have never been, it is truly an experience every Catholic should have a serious exposure to – and by serious, I mean, attending at least 3 or 4 times in relatively short succession.  If you still don’t like it after that, so be it – and there are a few, I must admit, especially those of the generation that were taught that the TLM was really bad and just had to be replaced, for their own good – but you owe it to yourself to try it, even at the cost of some effort (one which Dr. K does not mention – often very long travel times, and in other dioceses, inconvenient hours).

Out of time.  2000 words anyway.  You got your fill!

Bishop Gracida: Prepare to Live like Catholics under the English Persecution September 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, different religion, episcopate, error, fightback, Francis, General Catholic, Holy suffering, Latin Mass, manhood, persecution, Revolution, Society, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I think this is a most insightful commentary, and one that I agree with.  The persecution of Catholics in Tudor/Jacobian England in the 16th and 17th centuries gives us a very clear picture of what it is like to suffer through a Church  that allows itself to be whored out to the opinions, desires, and whims of the powers that be.  This is precisely what many feel has happened to our beautiful Holy Mother Church in recent decades (though they would probably have the decency and good sense not to use such an awful term, but I feel that is the one that is the most descriptive), and we can expect the faithful remnant – a term I was surprised to see Bishop Gracida, whom I had failed to read for many months, using over and over again on his blog – to be treated as badly or worse by the establishment church as were the “recusants” of Merrye Ol’ several centuries ago.

The tactics, liturgical changes, and theology are virtually identical to the most militant, leftist wing of the protestant revolutionaries of Elizabethan times, too.

But I’ll let Bishop Gracida make his points, and add a few comments.  This commentary was an answer to a question asked by a 70 year old Catholic regarding that septuagenarian’s sense that the Church of today is not the one he grew up in – when the Church fails, where do we go?:

Don’t you realize that you have become part of the Remnant?

Your situation, our situation, is analogous to the situation in which Catholics found themselves in 16th Century England.  All of a sudden Catholics woke up and found that the Church in which they had grown up had changed.  The head of the Church in England, the Archbishop of Canterbury had come under the influence of liberals and progressives like Martin Luther and John Calvin.  Worse, the King, Henry VIII, had become a serial adulterer and he felt it was ok for him to ‘re-marry’ and still receive Holy Communion while living in an adulterous relationship because the good of the Nation required it. [or the good of the groin -as Henry fell deeper and deeper into total incontinence, even the pretense he was doing all his adulterating for “the good of the nation” dropped away]   And to put a proper face on it the King declared himself the Head of the Church, the Liturgy of the Mass changed with the genius [“genius”] of Archbishop Cranmer and all of a sudden Catholics in England woke up and found that they had become Anglicans.

Well, not ALL Catholics.  Some, like the author of the above article still considered themselves to be Catholics, not Anglicans and because they now constituted a small number of people compared to their Anglican neighbors they became a Remnant of the Catholic Church.

That is what you are.  That is what many of us are.

And as a consequence, we are going to experience persecution.  Not the same kind of persecution that English Catholics experienced under Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. [Ummm……wait and see. It might get pretty close, at least so far as being treated as heretics, schismatics, outsiders, and hateful bigots] You will cherish the Traditional Latin Mass when you can find it and you will learn to avoid the absurdities liberal priests and bishops introduce into the Novus Ordo Masses.

Just as English Catholics learned to avoid Anglican Masses celebrated by priests who were ordained not to offer the sacrifice of Jesus Christ but to set the table for a community meal, you will seek out priests, bishops (yes, and even popes) who manifest their belief in the Incarnate Lord Jesus Christ who suffered and died for us and who revealed his plan for us in the 2000 year magisterium of the Church we have possessed up to the present pontificate.

More from Bishop Gracida here, on why he signed the filial correction.

Lord, what good could be done with a few more such men.  Of course, he’s retired, and so it’s a lot easier for him to speak – and probably therein lies very much of the problem.

I’m not quite certain what the good bishop means about seeking out “popes who manifest their belief in the Incarnate Lord….” except that I’m certain he doesn’t meaning finding our own little Pope Michaels, et. al., to follow.  I am sure he means we turn to the popes of the past, the holy fathers who safely guided the Church with a far surer hand than the present trustee of the diocese of Rome.

At any rate it seems Bishop Gracida has become much more clear in his appreciation of the crisis facing the Church and the reality of the tiny number of the faithful. But our paucity of numbers is not a reason to lose hope, as I pray the next post may elucidate unsurreptitiously.

Today I can use my big boy words!

Brief Reminder: Fall Ember Days Start Tomorrow Wed 09/20 September 19, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, Liturgical Year, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, Tradition.
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The Fall Ember Days start tomorrow Wednesday September 20.  Partial fast and abstinence on Wednesday and Saturday, partial fast and full abstinence on Friday (partial fast: two snacks and one meal; partial abstinence, one meal with meat, two snacks without).

Ember Days were, of course, along with so much else of inestimable value, squashed as a law of the Church and obligatory practice, in the Western Church anyway, by Pope Paul VI in the wreckovating days of the 1960s. Nevertheless, observing these ancient seasons is eminently pleasing to God and very much good for our souls.  If we desire a restoration of the Faith, should that not include many of the old penitential days and seasons, which played such a vital part in raising up so many Saints in the holy days of old?  I think so, anyway.  I pray for the day when Ember Days, Rogation Days, fasts before major feasts outside Lent, and all the rest will be restored to their proper place in the life of the Church.

Videos from Fatima Rosary Procession 09/13/2017 September 14, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, Dallas Diocese, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Our Lady, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Victory, Virtue.
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For the fifth month in a row, Mater Dei FSSP parish in Irving, TX, held a Rosary Procession in honor of the 100th anniversary of Our Lady of Fatima.  The final centennial procession will be held Friday, October 13 at 7pm and will process along public streets (SH 356/Irving Blvd) from Mater Dei to Trinity View Park at the Irving/Dallas border.

Attendance was very good last night.  I would guesstimate between 250 and 300 people attended.  And this isn’t even the “big” procession! See below.  

I love what the organizers have done with the lighting of Our Lady for these night processions.  It was really beautiful.

Videos below.  I did not capture every moment of the procession, which took over half an hour, but did get most major portions.  It gives a flavor for it, anyway, which is not bad, considering I didn’t plan on recording ahead of time, I just decided to on the spot.

Filmed by hand.  There is some jiggly screen, but not too much, I don’t think.  If that bothers you, you might not want to watch.

Errors of “Big Bang” Cosmology and Other Good Sermons September 13, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I posted a link to the first sermon below – back when Audio Sancto was a going concern – back in 2013.  It’s been on Youtube for some time, but the timing felt right again to bring up this subject, what with all the comments received in the post I did on evolution being at the foundation of the collapse of Christianity in the 20th century.

The priest giving the sermon is a trained scientist, in the field of biology.  I am not a scientist, but as I said in the previous post on evolution, I have been steeped in the scientific indoctrination establishment throughout my education and professional career, and I have worked as a practicing engineer for nearly 25 years now.  I am not scientifically illiterate.  Neither is Father in the sermon.

This priest has given numerous sermons against the errors of modern science, cosmology, and evolution in particular.  I feel the one below is the best, but here are links to several of his other sermons on this subject (Link 1, Link 2, Link 3, Link 4).  Thanks to Steve Cunningham for putting all these truly edifying videos up.  Some of the visuals are outstanding.

Appeals to authority may constitute logical fallacies, but I can state that, from my personal experience that, with the possible exception of Father Michael Rodriguez, the priest in this video is probably the best teacher and most convincing catechist I’ve ever been blessed to learn from.

I don’t want to beat this subject to death, and I have other videos I’d like to present as well, but I think this is as good a sermon on the subject of modern cosmology as I’ve ever heard.  At the very least, it presents serious challenges and asks penetrating questions. In terms of the other videos linked above, this one is probably most worth your time.  It notes the truth, which is that evolution was deliberately construed not as simply a scientific theorem, but as a thoroughgoing philosophy which undergirds a competing and inveterately hostile religion, that of materialist rationalism or, as I call it, sexular paganism.

The comments are interesting.  There are some substantial (if very brief) criticisms of Father’s arguments.  But mostly there are ad hominem attacks against religion in particular and metaphysics in general.  Stupid Greeks, didn’t they know  they were just wasting their time thinking about truth, when the material is all there is?  One thing these proselytes of modern science either do not know, or refuse to admit, is that when they laud “science” for only considering the material, they fail to acknowledge that it wasn’t always thus, and that it required both the sundering of Christendom through the protestant revolution, and the subsequent ascendancy of rationalism, to create a new scientific philosophy that, as a matter of deliberate choice, not evidence or reason, excluded the non-material.  You can think Descartes and Bacon, largely, for that, and they were not wholly dispassionate in their motives.

Hopefully less controversially, another excellent sermon from a very good priest, one I which I knew better, on the grand matter of humility.  There is nothing really ground-breaking in the sermon, but good, solid catechesis on an absolutely vital virtue that is so little understood and practiced in our time.  This priest is associated with an apostolate I think is so key, which is the re-evangelization of Latin America to authentic Catholicism through the spread of the Traditional Mass.  Please consider supporting this apostolate.

This final sermon is actually from the great Moral Doctor Saint Alphonsus Ligouri.  It’s read by someone, I know not whether they are a priest or no.  In this sermon, St. Alphonsus expostulates on the fact that, for each one of us, there are only a certain number of sins each person is allotted before God forgives no more of them. He bases his sermon on Scripture, the Fathers of the Church and common sense. A most powerful sermon and on a topic that many either do not know or are reluctant to countenance.  I believe I have blogged excerpts from others of St. Alphonsus’ voluminous writings on this subject, but darned if I can find them now.  This might be the most important of all the sermons listed in this post:

 

Holy Hour in Various Parishes of Dallas Diocese Tonight at 7pm September 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, Eucharist, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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Bishop Edward J. Burns has asked the 74 Catholic churches in the Diocese of Dallas to hold a Holy Hour with Eucharistic Adoration on Thursday, September 7, 2017 at seven o’clock in the evening. Bishop Burns will preside at the Holy Hour at the Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe at 2215 Ross Avenue in Downtown Dallas. He also asked that all churches in the diocese ring their bells five minutes before the Holy Hour begins. [Dang.  Wish we had some bells to ring.]

According to Bishop Burns, “This is an opportunity for Catholics to come together to pray for those affected by the hurricane, and in particular for those who have lost their lives. This is something that is being done, to the extent possible, in every diocese in Texas as an act of solidarity and prayerful support with our suffering brothers and sisters.” [Perhaps we should also make acts of reparation during this Holy Hour for the sins of our nation which are bringing Lord knows what calamities down upon us.]

The Bishop has asked that parishes also pray the Rosary before Masses on September 9th and 10. Donated Rosary beads will be distributed before Mass and gathered up to be given to evacuees with the message that the prayer had been offered for them and all victims of Hurricane Harvey.

Mater Dei parish in Irving will be joining all the parishes in the diocese to offer a Holy Hour on Thursday evening for those affected by Hurricane Harvey. At Mater Dei, Benediction and Adoration begin immediately after the 6:30p Mass on Thursday, September 7th and will last for one hour.

As for other parishes, I really don’t know which are joining in this spiritual work of mercy.  I haven’t time to check.  Time is getting short, but you might call to see if your parish is joining in this.  I know of several which are not participating.

I do very much appreciate Bishop Burns calling for the Holy Hour, and for leading one himself at the Cathedral.  I’ll be at Mater Dei.

h/t reader MJD

Fallen Culture: TLM Parish Encounters Supporters, Haters in Rural Kentucky Town August 10, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in asshatery, cultural marxism, error, fightback, General Catholic, Latin Mass, Our Lady, paganism, persecution, Restoration, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sexual depravity, sickness, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Nice find by reader D.  This is a long article about a newish TLM parish in Park Hills, KY, a town of about 3000 people.  The TLMers have found quiet supporters and loud opponents, which opposition seems quite detached from any real-world concerns, but fall into “I don’t like them sortsa people” category.

Reader D speaks highly of the Missionaries of St. John the Baptist, who run this TLM community with 5(!!) priests.  And that for a parish with maybe 150 souls.  Shoot I wish we had five here in Irving!  We could sure use ’em!  I know only a little about the Missionaries of St. John, but good on all they seem to be doing, especially Eucharistic processions on public streets which seem to have weirded the local freakshow out.

Various excerpts from this long article:

In Park Hills, a beautiful spot on the Kentucky side of the river, a group of traditional Catholic newcomers wants to build a grotto, like the one in Lourdes, France, where miracles are said to have happened.

But the preparation for such a miracle is drawing fire from those who worry about the traffic that would come, the changes that would be required of the town of 3,000 and the more narrow mindset that many say is coming with it.

“Everyone is entitled to believe what they want,” said resident Gretchen Stephenson. “I have a problem when those beliefs cross into our secular government.” [I’m not sure how building a grotto on private land somehow compromises secular government.  Basically what the article reveals is a deep hostility towards believing Christians, and anything those Christians want to do]

……….A year ago, Our Lady of Lourdes Church opened.

Not many in the community took note when, in June 2016, Covington Bishop Roger Foys issued a decree consecrating the 80-year-old church building. A year earlier, the nondenominational Christian Faith Church moved out.

Our Lady of Lourdes is now the only diocesan-recognized church in the Cincinnati area devoted solely to the old Latin Mass………[Follows an interesting but common discussion of what separates the TLM from what passes for Catholicism in most locales over the past 50 years, including conversions/reversions because of the reverence and plain efficacy of the TLM]

[One thing I like about this parish is how public their displays of faith are.  We locals need to start entering floats in the Irving parades]……They participated in the town’s Memorial Day Parade with a float. A church member dressed as the Virgin Mary struck a prayerful pose on a float made to look like a grotto.

But they are clashing with the community.

They’re planning a grotto, like the one that made the peasant girl into St. Bernadette, and the cave into a destination for millions of pilgrims over the past 150 years. (Every year, 350,000 pilgrims continue to bathe in the waters of the spring in the grotto, which believers have attributed miraculous healings.) [Yes, but that’s Lourdes.  There are hundreds of Marian and even Lourdes grottoes around the country and few draw more than a few dozen a week over and above regular parishioners]

So intent are the members of Park Hills church on achieving this goal that they are raising $300,000 to $400,000 to have a grotto by 2019, according to the church newsletter.

To some residents, the image of thousands of pilgrims clogging their narrow streets has struck fear in their hearts. [Oh please.  Pure self-interested BS]

……….the church, in a statement, estimated the grotto will attract 50 people a day. The statue of Mary would be just under five feet.

“Anyone who cares to visit this little cave will find this a peaceful place,” said Father Sean Kopczynski, one of the priests at Our Lady of Lourdes, during a presentation to the Park Hills City Council……..

……The whole idea took Park Hills by surprise when it came to light in February. Those shocked included Mayor Matt Mattone who became mayor in 2015, his first public office.

“It’s surreal to me,” Mattone said. “It is kinda like a Twilight Zone I’ve inherited. All this is happening beneath the scenes that no one knew about and suddenly it’s coming to fruition.” [Good Lord these things are built on Catholic parishes every year!  It doesn’t harm the community, they should be grateful for the potential income from tourism and other sources.  Comparing a parish grotto to Lourdes is like comparing this tiny little parish of a couple hundred souls to St. Peter’s.  

The more you talk to residents and church members, the more the issue goes beyond the church and the grotto. Some neighbors feel the church has attracted an intolerant group of people to the city.The church members feel that they’re under attack from a city that doesn’t know or care about them. [And so we come to the point, a small town in KY serving as a microcosm of fallen post-Christian America, where there are sodomite couples just itching to take on the pretense of persecution so they can get their victimhood bucks]

………..An anti-gay bumper stickeron a car parked in a specific spot in this progressive town has raised her ire.

“We bought a gay pride flag,” Froelich said. “This is ridiculous. That kind of intolerance is not acceptable.” [No, what you mean is, I have deeply held religious beliefs, and Christian beliefs contradict my own, and I don’t want to countenance that.  Note parishioners claim the bumper sticker issue has been the source of progressive lies, which, given things like how the recent Google memo was utterly misrepresented by the press and progressives, but I repeat myself, go figure]

Bob Ford noticed the bumper sticker while working in his garden this February. It was affixed to a gray sedan parked in front of the house he and his husband, Steve Crites, have owned for the past nine years.

Cars often don’t park in front of their home due to the narrow streets.

Church members and residents differ on what the bumper sticker said.

Ford and Crites said the sticker had the phrase “It’s Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve,” implying homosexuality is heretical. Ford and Crites don’t think it was accidental that the car with that bumper sticker ended up parked in front of their home for more than a week.

“No, this does not need to happen here,” Ford said were his first thoughts. “Can you believe this?”

The sticker had been slapped on over an anti-abortion sticker that had been on the car. Those in the neighborhood said it belonged to church members at the end of the street. Church members said the bumper sticker read: “Male and Female He created Them -Genesis 1:27.”

“Obviously with the Catholic Church and the Ten Commandments, which everyone used to believe, there’s a whole tension in a society that’s very divided,” church pastor Collins said.

Some residents rushed to the church’s defense. They see the church as the victim of hate.

It’s everyone else that’s intolerant, said one woman, identified only as Maureen, at a February council meeting.

………[City Councilwoman and parish supporter Pam] Spoor has recused herself from any votes about the church. She believes church members have been the target of undue scrutiny and harassment from the rest of the city[Indeed.  Small additions like this grotto rarely attract any political attention.  They happen all the time. Goodness a smaller one was built at our local parish last year with nary a peep.  There is bigotry and intolerance here, as noted below, but it’s not coming from the Catholics.]

“I don’t like to hear that from my city,” Spoor said. “I’ve lived in my city for 39 years. All the intolerance and bigotry, there is no room for that in any city.”

There is much more, and more revealing, at the link, but I’ve taken probably more than I should have. You should definitely read the rest.

It goes on to discuss how the parish held a procession on public streets  (good for them!), and how that really ignored the intolerant progressives in the nearby neighborhood.  So several of them camped out in front of the parish for hours one Sunday with phones in hand ready to record this horrible assault on their progressive sensibilities.  Unfortunately, the bullying may have worked, or perhaps prudence was at play, but the community just lapped around the parish property instead of giving public witness as they have in the past.

As reader D noted, what a commentary on both our Church and our times.  Now the few faithful Catholics are the oddballs, the trouble makers, the targets of persecution, while the leadership of the Church almost universally prostrates itself before a culture that will always, always hate them, not for what they do, but for Whom they represent.

Get ready for tough times ahead.  But such times make martyrdom, and God loves best those who cooperate with the trials and mortifications He sends, or allows.

I pray this parish gets their grotto, and that they witness our glorious Faith as boldly and fervently and as publicly as humanly possible.

The comments on the article are typical – Church haters and defenders of Tradition.  One interesting point noted in the comments is that the area already has 3 Catholic grottoes of various types, and they haven’t caused the flood of traffic so dreaded by opponents of the parish.  This is about antipathy toward authentic Catholicism, pure and simple.

I would say briefly, in conclusion – imagine opposing a shrine to the Holy Mother of God.  What a sick, perverse, and most of all pathetically small-minded time we live in.

Yeah, it’d be terrible to have this in my town