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Saint Alphonsus on the Proper Hearing of Mass November 11, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, reading, Saints, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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From Volume XV of Saint Alphonsus Ligouri’s Ascetical Works, Preaching (only get the translations by Father Eugene Grimm, CSsR, the others are markedly deficient and full of modern errors and radical changes to Saint Alphonsus crystal-clear theology), an exhortation on the proper hearing of Mass, including what constitutes, in the Saint’s mind, irreligious and even sinful hearing of Mass:

Before I begin the excerpt, I should note that the section below regarding not going to Confession during Mass does not mean Sacramental Confession, which is of course not only permitted but encouraged during Mass or any other time, but the “implicit Confession” of the Confiteor.  Alphonsus is saying that if you have some grievous sin on your conscience, Mass does not remove the guilt of that sin, and explicit sacramental Confession must first be sought before assisting at Mass (this could of course be ongoing during Mass, but certainly before receiving Communion).

How should one hear Mass?

To satisfy the obligation of hearing Mass, two things are necessary: an intention and attention.

It is necessary to have an intention of hearing Mass, so that a man who is force into church against his will, or who enters only to look about him and see the place (NB: as many tourists do during Mass at famous churches throughout Europe), or to wait there for a friend, or for any other purpose except hearing Mass, does not fulfil the obligation.  But, should a person hear Mass through devotion, believing that the day is not a holiday, he is bound, when he finds that it is a holiday, to hear another Mass?  No; it is enough to have done the work commanded without having adverted to the intention of fulfilling the precept of hearing Mass.

It is necessary to hear Mass with attention – that is, to attend to the Sacrifice that is celebrated.   This attention may be external and internal.  It is certain that a person who hears Mass without external attention does not fulfil his obligation; for example, if during the Mass you are asleep, or are drunk, or are employed in writing, talking, or other external operations, you do not fulfil the precept of hearing Mass.

It is disputed among theologians whether a person who attends Mass without internal intention satisfies his obligation’ that is, if he sees what is going on, but is at the same time distracted, and employed in thinking not on God, but on other things.  Many theologians say that he is guilty of a venial, but not a grievous, sin, as often as he is voluntarily distracted, and that he fulfils the substance of the precept because he hears Mass with a moral presence. But the greater number of theologians, following St. Thomas, teach that such a person does not fulfil the obligation of hearing Mass, namely, when he is conscious that he is distracted, and not attending to the Mass, and positively wishes to continue in his distractions.

Hence I exhort you, in hearing Mass, to reflect on the great Sacrifice which is being offered. Meditate on the Passion of Jesus Christ; for the Mass is a renewal of the Sacrifice that Jesus Christ offered on the cross. Or meditate on some eternal truth – on death, judgment, or hell. Let him who knows how to read make use of some little book, or let him recite the office of the Blessed Virgin……..say the Rosary, or some other vocal prayers: let them, at least, attend to what the priest is doing.

Does a person who makes his confession during Mass satisfy the obligation of hearing Mass?  No; for then he would attend it as a criminal accusing himself of his sins, and not as a person offering sacrifice; and it is certain that all who hear Mass offer sacrifice along with the priest.

Hence it would be advisable during Mass to offer the Holy Sacrifice for the ends for which it was instituted: adoration, contrition, thanksgiving, and supplication.

During the Mass, then, we ought, first, to offer to God the Sacrifice of His Son in honor of His Divine Majesty; secondly, in thanksgiving for all the benefits we have received from him; thirdly, in satisfaction for our sins; and fourthly, to implore of God, through the merits of Jesus Christ, the graces necessary for our salvation.  At the elevation of the Host, let us ask God to pardon our sins, for the sake of Jesus Christ, and at the elevation of the chalice, let us beg of God, through the merits of that Divine Blood, the gift of His love and holy perseverance. And during the Communion of the priest, let us make a spiritual Communion, saying: My Jesus, I desire to receive Thee; I embrace Thee: do not permit me to ever be separated from Thee.

———————-End Quote———————

No special message in this post, just some hopefully helpful reminders and exhortation to even better devotion and practice at the source and summit of our Faith, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

His Excellency Bishop Athanasius Schneider’s Visit Was a Remarkable Blessing October 21, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, FSSP, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I will try to post a thorough recap of yesterday’s Pontifical High Mass tomorrow, but for now a few pictures of my family with Bishop Schneider which we were blessed to take after receiving the bishop’s blessing and having a short conversation with him.  He is a gentle and virtuous man, whose concern for souls is eminently apparent from even brief interaction with him.  I thank Bishop Burns of the Diocese of Dallas for letting both the Blessed Karl Symposium and the Pontifical High Mass, involving a foreign bishop, to take place, and I again thank David Ross for putting together the symposium and making this Mass possible.  That was a most commendable work, and I know it required a huge amount of effort.

Well, it only took 9+ years, but a bishop finally offered a Pontifical High Mass at Mater Dei, and he was from………….Kazakhstan.  Hurray for the Catholic Volga Germans:

Just a note, one of the kids in the picture was not mine, and one of mine was not present.  Also, my oldest daughter got cropped out of the picture by the person taking it, but you get the idea.

I hope to post more on the Pontifical High Mass tomorrow, I planned to post complete coverage today but the Pachamama destruction came up and that was most important.

A few more to tide you over:

Good Fruit of Francis’ Revolution – TLM Attendance Skyrocketing in US October 21, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, fightback, FSSP, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Restoration, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Victory, Virtue.
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+JMJ

Finally some hard numbers to put with the numerous anecdotes about rapidly increasing TLM attendance over the past few years.  I know from surveys and speaking with many of the recent “converts” to the Traditional Latin Mass, many of these folks are seeking out sanity and good Catholic liturgy and doctrine directly as a result of the errors being taught in their former parishes, and the horrific example of Francis which is often cited in those former parishes as reasons for rejecting and contradicting the perennial belief and practice of the Church.  Thus, in spite of himself, Francis and his cohort of aging hippies and Peronists are accomplishing much good in helping strengthen the Catholic counter-revolution.

The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter has put out some attendance numbers at a few representative parishes and they all show tremendous growth, whether very new or long and established.  I do not have attendance numbers for the other Ecclesia Dei communities or diocesan TLMs, nor the SSPX, though on the latter I have had discussions with a half dozen or more people who frequent SSPX chapels who say they have seen solid growth in the past year or two.

Halfway through the FSSP’s annual October census, Fraternity parishes and chapels around the country report major increases in Sunday Mass attendance compared with last year.

Newer apostolates have seen dramatic growth, some doubling their numbers over the last year, such as Los Angeles, which went from 250 per Sunday to 500. The apostolate did not even have its own church until 2018, so finally settling down in a small church in San Fernando provided needed stability, contributing to the significant increase it saw this past year.

“The main obstacle right now is a lack of space,” said Fr. Federico Masutti, assistant pastor of St. Vitus, talking to the Missive over the summer. His words echo the sentiment of so many other FSSP apostolates that find themselves outgrowing their buildings, but it’s really a great problem to have.

“When we were at 200 people,” said pastor Fr. James Fryar, “we decided to add the fourth Mass, and just adding that one Mass, from one week to the next, another 200 people came.”

“The growth was amazing,” confirmed Fr. Masutti.

In Naples, Florida, the FSSP has been operating for less than two years, and is at nearly 400 people per Sunday, up over 20 percent from last year.

“A plethora of young families are coming, attracted by the sacred beauty and reverence of the Mass, the traditional catechesis and true parish family life,” said pastor Fr. Jonathan Romanoski…………

“It’s more than just the Latin Mass—they’re coming for the community life and all of the groups we have—for adults, for kids, for catechesis,” he said. “They come because we are two priests, we are a small community where everybody can get to know each other and the families can truly bond.”

Two new apostolates established last year—in the dioceses of Philadelphia and Providence, Rhode Island—have started off strong and now have 400 and 300 parishioners, respectively. Both locations have inherited magnificent churches that should accommodate their communities for a long time………..

……….Even apostolates that have been established for a long time (by FSSP standards) have seen significant increases, but most report constraints of space that inhibit their growth and they look forward to building or buying new churches.

St. Anne Parish, our apostolate in San Diego, for example, was established in 2008, and despite having a small church that can seat approximately 200 adults, had reached more than 800 parishioners by 2018 with three priests offering five Sunday Masses. Now, they are averaging over 1,000.

“At some of our Masses we will have as many as maybe 350 people and so not everyone fits and so people are actually sitting outside the doors looking in through open doors,” said pastor Fr. John Lyons.

Other long-established FSSP parishes that have seen strong growth include our first North American apostolate, Mater Dei in Dallas, established in 1991, which has seen its Sunday congregation grow 24 percent from 1250 to 1550 in the last year. [It’s way north of 1600 now and touching on 1800 some Sundays.  It was about 200 in 2009.]

St. Joan of Arc Parish, our apostolate in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, has gone from 650 to 840 in the past two years, an increase of about 29 percent. Likewise, St. Francis de Sales in Atlanta, established in 1995, has grown 30 percent over the last year. In October of 2018, it averaged 460 people each Sunday; so far this month, it has over 600. +

Other established parishes like St. Rose Philippine in Kansas City have also grown a great deal.

Overall, it does seem the traditional Latin Mass continues to grow and thrive in virtually all locations where it has found a home.  If you have news of your local TLM parish or diocesan parish offering a TLM, please share.  This data is  very helpful, and encourages others to seek out and experience the Mass of all ages.  We’re not weird freaks!  We have many good and devout souls and lots of normal and fun people!  We’re all finding out way through this time of unprecedented darkness within and without Holy Mother Church as best we can.  Most of all, we need to all get together and support each other, whether SSPX or ICRSS or FSSP or CMRI or whatever.  Sure we may have differences, but what binds us together, and what threatens all of us, is much, much greater.

More to post later as I have time.  Good news from Las Cruces which I hope to get to early this week, and a report on Bishop Athanasius Schneider’s spectacular Pontifical High Mass at Mater Dei in Irving on 19th Sunday after Pentecost, October 20 2019.

In a Church in Chaos, Don’t Let Perfect Be the Enemy of Good Enough October 17, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in asshatery, blogfoolery, Dallas Diocese, error, foolishness, General Catholic, Latin Mass, pr stunts, sadness, self-serving, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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An article appeared at the generally strong Federalist a few weeks ago, which surprisingly centered on a disgruntled TLM-er – or former traddie – listing the manifest failures of the TLM parish from their point of view.  It seemed to me a rather strange choice for The Federalist, as they normally do politics from a reliably right wing perspective and most often are out there excoriating Never Trumpers, and rightly so.  But, whatevs.   You should read the whole thing.  I’d appreciate your insight on it.

Now, a few things up front. I happen to know the author.  Not really, but I’ve seen him.  He’s been around pretty regularly for several years.  I think he was in one of the choirs at one point. I don’t think I’ve ever spoken to him. And, the parish he was criticizing was my own, or, at least, given that he regularly assisted there off and on for years I’d tend to think it figured largely in his thinking.   I say that out front to let you know that I have a bit of a vested interest in this matter– this is the parish I have chosen to plight my troth with and raise my children in.  I am well aware of the limitations of traditional Catholicism generally in this time of unprecedented crisis, and of the priestly fraternity that operates the parish I attend, and of the parish itself.  The author, Auguste Meyrat, repeats many of the shopworn criticisms of traditional parishes – an ostensible lack of charity, the people are “weird” or “extreme” (but that tattooed, plate-lipped RCIA instructor at Our Lady of Feelin’ Good is groovy), not enough involvement or social outlets for single people in particular, etc.

All this could be taken as a given.  Virtually any parish, anywhere, that has not been led by Saint X, has suffered general lack of virtue.  That is our human nature. Even the parishioners of St. Jean Marie Vianney were the objects of constant, stinging rebukes from that great Saint, and his people were, especially after the first few years, souls who had been formed and influenced by someone virtually all the parishioners knew would be canonized someday.  This is the nature of any moderately sized grouping of people.  Souls gonna sin.  It’s our nature.  That doesn’t mean we don’t constantly strive for improvement.  Of course we do, and we need to hear correction from time to time, especially from our priests, who know our collective and individual failings far better than any layman ever could.

But that’s not my principle problem with this piece criticizing my parish.  My principle problem is the tone, the overall nastiness of the criticisms, the sense of entitlement, and the overweening lack of gratitude present.  To take a few examples (my comments):

………….TLM parishes can sometimes become unwelcoming places that feel more like strange cults than normal Catholic communities.” [oh?  What does a “normal” Catholic community feel like?]

……….This stance often makes some traditional Catholics weird, for lack of a better word. In their minds, countless Freemasons lurk in the shadows, the South really will rise again, monarchy is the ideal form of government, all music after 1700 is sinful, and the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy is the greatest work of literature after the Bible. [Huh.  I find Tolkein boring.  Sorry.  I got 50 pages into The Hobbit and quit.  Funny the author just quoted Taylor Marshall’s Infiltration (I did not include), and now drops this remark about Freemasons.  The South will what?  Monarchy?  Music what? What the heck are you talking about?  Speaking of, the author quotes Father Ripperger lovingly, and yet Father Ripperger has a lot negative to say about virtually any 20th century music.  So which is it?]

They believe the mainstream church is a disgrace, and everything outside the church is an apocalyptic wasteland. In response, they hope to create isolated, self-sustaining communities to buffet the tides of immorality and impiety surrounding them. [Yeah. Exactly.  Seriously, that’s one of the best descriptions for why I’m a traditional Catholic. It’s like the first rule of medicine – first, do no harm.  Protect what you have.  Defend your family.  Most of us find we have more than enough to fill our time doing just that. But some of us do occasionally make efforts to convert the wider culture.]

The more normal traditional Catholics at these parishes often go to great lengths to contain the nuttiness. [Really. Explain how.] Depending on the parish and the priests running it, they may succeed, or else they may find themselves falling into the same patterns. Without occasional outside contact, there is no reality check. [We live in a time where “outside contact” is practically unavoidable.  Be it radio, TV, internet, co-workers, neighbors, family, shopping, etc, the most insulated Catholics of today probably encounter 100 times as many people in a year than the most outgoing villagers and isolated farmers – the normative Catholic of 1700 – did.  This is silly.  Note also the author siting himself with the “normals.”  In this time of rampant sodomy, four year old transvestites, baby murder, drug addiction, unconstrained usury and rapacious capitalism, etc……..is that what’s being called “normal?”]

I could go on, but I’ll desist (in fact, I left out some of the harshest stuff).  I think you have by now gotten the tenor of the piece, and why I take exception to it.  It’s painting with a very coarse brush, and does not give anywhere near the exculpation for supposedly strange Trad behaviors that people might rightly deserve – such as the trauma at seeing friends and loved ones consumed and destroyed by this culture, the hatred and vitriol directed at them by the institutional Church, the destructive errors emanating from virtually every Novus Ordo pulpit every Sunday (let alone Rome and this pope, which the author essentially ignores or downplays to a level of insouciance) that lead souls to destruction in this life and in the next.  Again, I could go on and on.  If some Trads are extreme, if they tend towards a bit of strange behavior, perhaps they could be forgiven, for the damage they’ve incurred and the treatment they’ve been exposed to.

My real riposte to Meyrat, however, would be compared to what ideal are the current afficianados of the TLM so deficient?  Compared to some other parish?  Some Novus Ordo parish, perhaps?  If that’s the case, I’d say there is much more going on here than just a bit of concern about bad attitudes evidenced from time to time.

Or perhaps the comparison is to some hypothetical ideal that exists only in the author’s mind?  I suspect that’s the more likely.  Certainly, compared to some real Catholic communities that have existed, led by exceptional souls cooperating with grace in superhuman ways that have been the ideals towards which all Catholic communities have pointed for 2000 years, every Trad parish falls short.  Of course, so does every Novus Ordo parish, and to a remarkably greater degree.   Those past communities were led by people who now have “Saint” in front of their names.  These saintly communities rarely had to deal with both a culture and a Church in such utter, deplorable crisis and moral depravity.  But, nevertheless, if this is the ideal the author, strongly influenced, it seems, by Father Chad Ripperger, holds, then so be it.  This is rightly the ideal towards which all Catholic communities should aim.

But I still take exception to the type and manner of criticisms made.  I don’t think it’s helpful for people to be made fun of or made to seem ridiculous for failing to live up to the very highest standards of Catholic formation and community life of the past 2000 years, and I think to some extent that’s what’s going on here. In addition, the piece as a whole had far too much of the sense of an almost anthropological examination of some strange tribe, some “other” to be analyzed and criticized, but not joined or properly understood, rather like the author viewed himself as somehow above or separate from the community.

And that’s another point.  Our family has been very involved in this parish for 10 years.  My wife, particularly, knocks herself out, especially with regard to the high school co-op.  I’ve done a thing or two myself.  This is my biggest problem with Mater Dei.  While the parish has grown from 300 to 1800 in 10 years, the same 30 people seem to do 90% of the labor at the parish.  That’s not entirely true, speaking totally extemporaneously, out of every 100 new parishioners about 1 or 2 will come on board and really help out.  It’s a lot easier to just sit back and criticize and find fault, than to join in and help out and build up.  What?

The author was worried that weirdo trads are going to keep the TLM phenomenon from growing.  I think his analysis is quite off here, too. First, we can only plant, God alone gives the increase, but I think these pieces excoriating wide swaths of the TLM movement as strange, mean, and ugly do far more to keep souls away than the behavior of the 3 or 5% of stereotypical angry old Trads.  While I wouldn’t exactly describe this piece at The Federalist as being another circular firing squad amont Trads, it comes close, and does probably more harm than good, certainly more than the author intended.  In fact, I think broad criticisms like this are singularly unhelpful, especially published in a secular venue where lack of nuance can easily lead large numbers of people to develop the wrong idea.

I would also add that it is remarkable that for such deficient community, it is amazing that Mater Dei has managed to grow 600% over the past decade.  If the souls assisting at Mater Dei were anything like the author describes, that growth would have been impossible.  Virtually any other parish, Novus Ordo or TLM, would love to have had such growth over the same timeframe.  I don’t think that is accidental, or would have been possible with such a toxic community as described in the piece.   The same goes for the other regional TLMs in Tyler, Fort Worth, Houston, and Oklahoma City, to varying degrees.

Alright, I’m done defending my parish.  It’s not that I think this parish, or TLM parishes in general, are above criticism.  Certainly, I’ve had some things to say in the past, but generally much more specific and to the point.  It’s more that I think this particular criticism was off base, and may have said a bit more about the author than it did the parish.  Naturally, in matters such as this, your mileage may vary.  If the author had other parishes in mind when crafting this piece, my analysis still applies, though somewhat less forcefully and specifically.  I think the trope of “mean old trads” and traditional Catholic moral deficiences – as a group, as opposed to individuals – needs to die, or at least be something we see far, far less of.  Or of which we see far, far less, for the English teachers out there.

Notable Events: Blessed Karl Symposium in Dallas and Pontifical High Mass at Mater Dei October 15, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Restoration, Society, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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The first Pontifical High Mass, of which I am aware, in Dallas for over 50 years is to be held this Sunday, October 20th at Mater Dei Latin Mass parish in Irving.  The Mass is at 9am.  The 11:30 high Mass is cancelled for this day.  Principal celebrant of the Mass will be His Excellency the Auxiliary Bishop of Astana in Kazakhstan, Athanasius Schneider.  Seating will be very limited.  Seating opens at the conclusion of the 7am Mass and will probably be filled within minutes.  There is spillover seating in the hall and cry room.  The Mass is projected to last approximately 3 hours.

The reason for Bishop Schneider’s visit is the Blessed Karl Symposium being held the previous day at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Dallas.  This is an annual symposium which began last year and is attracting significant personages of the Church and the former imperial family.  Bishop Schneider will be the keynote speaker at this symposium.  The local man who has gone to great effort to begin these symposiums last year and greatly expand the one this year is to be greatly commended.  This kind of work contributes significantly to the re-seeding of the great Catholic Tradition and the forgotten patrimony of the Church.  It appears that tickets for this year’s symposium, like last’s, are sold out.

Nevertheless, details below.

Finally, a brief talk from Bishop Schneider, given at Rome very recently, and attended by Cardinals Muller, Burke, Arinze, and others.  Michael Matt presents this as a budding “resistance movement” to the current pontificate.  If so, I’m afraid it may be several years late, but better now than never, I suppose.  The talk by Bishop Schneider makes clear that he, for one, sees grave theological delicts emanating from the current synod and rejects both its premises and its pre-determined outcomes (barring, of course, some dramatic divine intervention).

The Mass is likely to be crazy but I’ve never been to a pontifical high Mass and I wouldn’t miss this one!  I will try to record the sermon and share it with you if the quality is passable.  I have to think at least a little bit of Bishop Schneider’s talk below will wind up in the sermon we hear on Sunday, God willing.

Diocese News: Good Father Paul Weinberger Reassigned from St. William in Greenville to St. Monica in Dallas [UPDATED] September 6, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Dallas Diocese, General Catholic, Holy suffering, Latin Mass, Liturgy, manhood, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, Virtue.
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[UPDATE: COMMENTS CLOSED.  You people know I have your e-mails and IPs, right?  It’s kind of obvious when you all use the same one. This campaign of character assassination will not be permitted to continue.]

This is one of those sad/happy, good news-bad news kinda things.  Good local priest Father Paul Weinberger (as to the good, you can find several instances of this by searching his name on this blog) has been reassigned from his role as pastor of St. William parish in Greenville, on the periphery of the Diocese, to St. Monica parish in north Dallas.  I just spoke with Father Weinberger, and he advises that he will be priest in residence at Saint Monica, and will serve publicly there offering Mass and Confession, but only after a period of personal time in which he takes care of some long-delayed matters related to the estates of his deceased parents.

I say this is good news/bad news because it is bittersweet anytime a priest is reassigned, especially one that had been so long at one parish as Father Weinberger had.  He had been at St. William about 18 years and had expressed hopes of serving there for the rest of his priestly ministry. In that time, many families had moved to the Greenville area to enjoy both a more rural manner of living and to take advantage of Father Weinberger’s very solid catechesis, reverent liturgy, and abundant Confession. Obviously many of those people are very sad to see Father Weinberger go.  Father Weinberger is being replaced by one of the Diocese’s younger priests, Father Edwin Leonard.

But now, Father Weinberger is moving on to St. Monica, a centrally located and well known parish, where many more souls may take advantage of his gifts.  I’m certain he will be well received.  Whether Father Weinberger will be offering Latin Mass at St. Monica or publicly performing other devotions such as the nightly Rosary processions and frequent confessions is not known at this time (uh, because I forgot to ask).

Our family attended St. William for several years before eventually, and not without some sadness, moving on to Mater Dei and the full time Traditional Latin Mass.  We have missed Father Weinberger over the years and look forward to being able to see him again, now that he is much closer to Irving. It was a nearly hour to drive out to Greenville, now he’ll only be about 15 minutes away.

Please pray for Father Weinberger and the parishioners of St. William. Losing a long time beloved priest can be very painful. I understand that at least some of the families will be traveling to Mater Dei on Sundays, so you Mater Dei readers be on the lookout for new faces (I know……..which ones?)!  I will provide updates on Father Weinberger and his service at St. Monica as they become available.

Watch Michael Davies, William F. Buckley, and Malachi Martin Completely Dismantle Post-Conciliar Amchurch August 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, General Catholic, history, Latin Mass, Restoration, Revolution, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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The video below was recorded in 1980.  Michael Davies, God rest his soul, was a young and very charismatic man who had already written several books defending Archbishop Lefebvre and exposing the protestantizing changes in the Mass.  He had also developed ample evidence that the changes were deliberately made to change the belief and practice of believing Catholics in order to turn the Catholic Church into something other than the entity Christ founded our Holy Mother to be.

That evidence comes to the fore repeatedly as a certain Father Joseph Champlin repeatedly tries, in true post-concliar fashion, to so parse and muddy the Faith that not even licentiates in sacred theology could make heads or tails of what the Church was supposed to believe, what the current pope was promoting, or how the Church fell into the general post-conciliar mess.  Certainly it is true that there were a number of factors at work in, for instance, the total collapse in vocations in historically Catholic/Christian countries (lumping the US in that group for convenience), but to pretend that the loss of 50,000 priests and nearly 100,000 religious in a mere 10 years after the close of Vatican II had nothing, or very little, to do with the massive changes imposed on the Faith in the wake of that council is laughable, as Davies and Buckley repeatedly demonstrate. Fr. Champlin, who was part of the disastrously liberal Dioceses of Rochester and Syracuse in New York, repeatedly had to engage in what I found to be deliberate obfuscation and attempts to so parse matters of theology that virtually no one could rightly claim to know what the Church believed, at least beyond what the most recent pope had declared.  He had to do this because both the Council and the post-conciliar popes at various times and places made declarations in open conflict with the well defined, long-declared solemn Doctrine of the Faith.

This was a regular modernist ruse, reducing the Faith to meaningless or practical indeciperable nonsense that no lay person could hope to comprehend, in stark contrast to the clear belief of the pre-conciliar Church.

Anyway the debate is well worth your time and is a helpful time capsule in understanding how the battle over the mind and soul of the Church was fought in its early days. I would say that traditional critiques of the Council, and more particularly, that false “spirit” that came in its wake, have only sharpened and improved since then.

It is also interesting to point out how even at this point – more than 10 years after the implementation of the Novus Ordo – a large majority of Catholics polled indicated their preference in returning to the Mass of the ages.

SSPX to Build Huge New Parish in St. Mary’s, Kansas July 14, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Latin Mass, Liturgy, Restoration, SSPX, Tradition.
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Two things immediately come to mind after viewing this video on Rorate Caeli – 1. I’ll have to check this place out, I’ve never been to St. Mary’s, and 2., St. Mary’s is way, way bigger than Mater Dei.  6 Masses a day with one in a gymnasium seating what looks like close to 600 people, the video sort of vaguely mentions 4000 people attending St. Mary’s.  I don’t know if that means every Sunday, but with Mater Dei averaging about 1500 on a Sunday St. Mary’s is much larger.  And, I am not surprised, it is in a sense SSPX-town USA, and has been around 13 or 31  years longer than the FSSP parish in the Dallas Diocese.  I had long suspected that if there was a TLM parish with higher attendance on Sunday than Mater Dei, it would be St. Mary’s.

Well, God bless them, and may He bless this work. Whatever one thinks of the SSPX – and I for one am very grateful for Archbishop Lefebvre and the priestly society he started and maintained, since without it the TLM and the entire traditional practice of the Faith would probably have been expunged from the Church – this is a huge step forward for the entire traditional movement. This is a cathedral-class building being built for the sole use of the Traditional Latin Mass and the traditional practice of the Faith.  It’s a huge undertaking and requires at least $30 million (construction budgets have a tendency to go up as construction advances, but this crew looks like they are really focused on keeping a lid on expenses).  And, I must say, it looks like this new church when built will be architecturally and artistically significant.  I do pray it has outstanding stained glass and other aspects of liturgical art – there is a great deal available on the market these days, with so many ancient and beautiful churches being razed in Europe and parts of the US.

It looks less and less likely that we will have anything similar (certainly not on such a scale) locally.  The funding just isn’t there.  Well, a new church will happen in God’s good time.  If you feel inspired to help bring a substantial new traditional Catholic parish to fruition, you can donate here.

As the Vatican Descends into Chaos, Good News on the Local Front June 17, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, North Deanery, Restoration, Sacraments, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I am sorry for the lack of content the past many months……..there have been various reasons.  I hope to shift to a different format shortly and get more content out that is less time-consuming to make, but that will have to wait.

What could not wait, in spite of the paganization of the Church emanating from the Rome of Francis the Humble, is some very good news on the local front.  I reported during Lent that Father Jason Cargo, pastor of St. Joseph parish in Richardson, TX, had initiated a weekly Latin Mass according to the Rite of Paul VI on Thursdays during that penitential season.  Well that Mass continued and has been made permanent.  In addition, Father Cargo has substantially increased the times where the great neglected (and, by the modernists, feared and loathed) Sacrament of Confession is available: now on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturday (starting July 1).  Please continue to pray for Father Cargo, he is a wonderful younger priest who is doing much to bring about the restoration of more authentic forms of Catholicism in the Diocese of Dallas.

Speaking of young priests working to restore our glorious Holy Mother Church, Father Marco Rangel has been named pastor of the huge parish of St. Mark in Plano, replacing the now retired Father Cliff Smith.  Father Rangel is another young priest who is very interested in the great Tradition of our Faith and who I am certain will be a very good shepherd for St. Mark.  I have lost touch with Father Rangel since he was assigned to other areas of the Diocese but when I knew him as a newly ordained priest who would wear Roman chasuble at Mass (including black for funeral Masses) and his cassock around the parish I have always been impressed.  I think Father Rangel’s assignment at St. Mark means there is potential for more authentic/traditional forms of the Liturgy there, as well.

Father Smith was a good man and priest, he did a great deal to support homeschooling  families in the northern Dallas suburbs, including making available a large facility for a homeschool co-op  to operate out of St. Marks. He did far more than most of his contemporaries by being willing to offer, if perhaps with some reluctance, an “experimental” Novus Ordo Latin Mass at his parish for over a year. He and I disagreed on various points but he was always more patient with hard cases like me than deserved and did make a number of positive changes, such as greatly expanding St. Mark’s confession times several years ago.  I pray he has a blessed and pious retirement.

All this indicates to me that Bishop Burns is either much more conservative or traditional in outlook, or that he has at least loosened the frankly unjust restraints his predecessor, the close Francis-ally Cardinal Farrell, imposed on priests of this diocese (such as refusing permission to offer Mass in Latin to ANY priest outside Mater Dei or St. William in Greenville, while admitting that restraint did not apply to any other language – pastors were and are free to start or change a Mass in Spanish to Vietnamese or Korean or Swahili or whatever language, so long as it was not the dreaded and feared Latin).

But, modernist/leftist types have always chosen to define themselves much more by what they hate and fear than by what they love.  So go figure.

If you know of other good news, please let me know.   I am increasingly convinced that there will be another locale offering the TLM outside the designated ghetto of Mater Dei in Irving (not a knock on Mater Dei at all, I love it, but let’s face it, that’s what it is, a place to stuff all the worst miscreants and hopefully keep us mollified) within the next few years, barring any unforeseen events (such as Francis or his replacement attempting to re-abrogate the TLM; I would not put it past them, as they sing a new totally wrecked Episcopal-lite “church” into being, the contrast offered by the TLM communities and any other islands of orthodoxy will be too much for them to bear.  Plus, their hate must have an outlet).  So let us all pray with ever more fervor that this be prevented from occurring, by some miracle.  And let us be thankful for these positive developments and the many others that are likely occurring without our knowledge. Even though some of these situations may not be as “perfect” as we may ultimately desire, they are still very positive and should be recognized, as each step in the right direction leads more and more souls to an authentic, Christ-pleasing, traditional practice of the Faith, and most importantly in my mind significantly increases their likelihood of salvation, which after all is the point of it all.

So, more like this, please.

Father Michael Rodriguez – Is It Acceptable for Catholics to Assist at the Novus Ordo……..? April 8, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Father Rodriguez, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, manhood, Restoration, Spiritual Warfare, SSPX, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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………and is it acceptable to assist at the SSPX if that is their only alternative? Interestingly,, Dr. Peter Kwasniewski of Wyoming Catholic College, among many others, agrees with the latter conclusion regarding the SSPX, that yes it is acceptable/licit (the question of validity having long ago been settled) to assist at the SSPX, particularly when one is faced with a liturgical desert in a particular locale..  I agree with both good men, and I’m very grateful that the SSPX is around in this current climate.

Now, I personally feel increasingly strongly that one should assist at the TLM if one is reasonably available.  Of course, the definition of reasonable availability will vary from person to person.  But I would also add that not all Novus Ordo Masses are the same.  While they are exceedingly rare, rarer, in many cases, than the TLM, very reverently offered Novus Ordo Masses with priests who are solidly catechized and who promote the solemn Doctrine of the Faith to the utmost of their ability are to me an exception to this general guideline.  I do have a personal bias, however, in that just such a Mass and priest played a pivotal role in my family finding its way to the TLM.  That priest continues to serve and do very much good.  Other viable options are reverent Eastern Rite Masses and the like.  There is a quite worthy option in the Irving area in St. Basil’s.

Finally, I’m sure SSPX partisans may take exception to framing of Kwasniewski’s post, making an argument that the SSPX is okay in certain conditions.  I know many folks fully believe that the situation is quite the opposite, with the SSPX being entirely justified and association with it being really the default option. I get where you’re coming from.  But rather than taking exception for Kwasniewski failing to evaluate the SSPX’s status as you might prefer, consider how far the situation has come in just the past few  years, where now mainstream conservative Catholic sites are proclaiming it just fine to assist at an SSPX Mass for the Sacraments in the vast majority of cases (because a liturgical and doctrinal wasteland full of abuse and outright evil is exactly what most people face in this tragic time in Church history).

Anyway, Father Michael Rodriguez below, along with Father Isaac Mary Relyea, answering a number of questions at a recent Catholic conference.  You’ll take this short post, and you’ll like it!