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Blessed Miguel Pro, the Cristiada, and the Synagogue of Satan May 1, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Holy suffering, Latin Mass, manhood, martyrdom, mortification, priests, Saints, sanctity, secularism, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Great sermon from Padre Not Tony Romo, on the life and suffering of Blessed Miguel Pro.  He then ties in his own apostolate trying to re-establish the authentic practice of the Faith in Latin America generally and once so devout Mexico in particular.

As is widely known, Blessed Miguel Pro, SJ, was one of many Catholic priest-martyrs of the Cristiada in Mexico, which developed after a masonic-inspired cabal of Christ-hating pseudo-revolutionaries gained control of that tortured nation’s governance.  I did not know, as Father relates, that Blessed Miguel Pro levitated during his final Mass before his capture and martyrdom, nor that his face was transfigured as on Mount Tabor.  Very interesting.

I like how Father notes the false Catholics of our time (and all times), those who, when confronted with a contradiction between the Truth of Jesus Christ and the ways of the world, choose the world over Jesus Christ.  Father does not say this, but the greatest reason for the crisis in the human element of the Church is that the vast majority of priests and prelates today are of just that type of Catholic, those who choose the world over Jesus Christ in the constant belief and practice of the Faith.  In fact, there was an entire ecumenical council that was captured, or hijacked, by this same spirit.  Or, at least, many think, and so it seems.

Many of those who choose the world over Christ lambaste those who still cling to Christ and His Truth as extremists, fanatics. Amazingly, guns are no longer needed to persecute the Faith out of Catholics, Catholics have largely voluntarily lost their faith under the bad example of so many priests and prelates, the errors taught since 1965, and the practice of all manner of immodesty, unchastity, and personal filthiness.  That is to say, the reason men like Plutarco Calles used violence was to force Catholics of the time to lose their faith through exposure to evils like pronographic sexual education in the state schools that replaced parochial schools.  Today, people happily partake of far worse of their own volition.

Good sermon:

I have had the privilege of meeting this priest and I follow his apostolate with some closeness.  I continue to be impressed with his devotion to the many souls in his care and efforts to restore the Catholic Faith in Mexico, which never really

Sorry if this is too many sermons for one day!

Two Complimentary Views of the Crisis in the Church May 1, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, cultural marxism, episcopate, General Catholic, Good St. Joseph, Grace, history, Latin Mass, paganism, priests, scandals, secularism, sickness, Society, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Victory, Virtue.
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I originally thought to frame this post as two contrasting views, but that wouldnt’ be right.  Yes the Church is in dire straits, possibly enduring the worst crisis in her long history, as Michael Matt notes in the first video, but that might only make the likelihood of God working a miraculous turnaround even greater, as the priest notes in the second video.

Both are very much worth your time and consideration, especially, in the first, for the heartfelt eulogy Mr. Matt delivers for his departed friend and co-worker in the devastated vineyard, John Vennari.  I think there is worth in fleshing out something Matt alludes to, as well: he repeatedly defends Vennari, and himself, for their “strident” beliefs in noting they were simply elucidating the Doctrine of the Faith as it has always been believed and practiced.  The other side, the progressive-modernist side, does not get this; because they elevate, heck, exalt, their own opinion above that of the solemnly defined Doctrine of the Faith to such a marked extent, they assume everyone else must do this as well.  Thus they smear Catholics with “extemism” in defending what has always been the de fide mind of the Church, but which so many, including probably most bishops, now dismiss as mere opinion.

It’s a good video:

Also worth watching is this video on on the great corollary notion, the historical fact of God working improbable, even impossible turnarounds, snatching victory from the jaws of defeat time and time again.  Now most of the examples below are examples of personal conversion or healing, rather than the societal/ecclesiastical restoration, which we desperately need today, but there are certainly plenty of the latter I can think of.  The Counter-Reformation, what might better be called the Great Catholic Counter-revolution, is probably the most obvious.  There were a dozen different periods between 1520 and 1660 when the entire Catholic Faith faced seeming extinction in the face of the protestant onslaught.

And, of course, it was Athanasius contra mundum in 320 or so.  Then there was Joan of Arc saving France from English domination and, through that and the folly of Henry VIII, the ascendance of false protestantism over Christianity in the 16th century.  The very foundation of our Faith is based in a miraculous recovery from the darkest of events, when it seemed the Savior of the world had been put to death and crushed beneath a tyrannical people’s hatred.

But there is some really interesting catechesis from ~13:00 – 17:30 when the priest discusses the role of the occult on both the Allied and Axis side in WWII and the ascendance of the post-Christian ultra-rationalist cult of scientific materialism since.  We are plainly as a culture and Church experiencing God’s wrath for our lack of faith and deviance from not only devotion to Him but to the very truth itself.

The sermon also includes an illuminating study of the horrid pantheistic neo-pagan cult ceremony that marked the opening of the Gotthard base tunnel in Switzerland.  That was a literal flipping of the bird towards God.  And yes there was a Catholic priest, in addition to a protestant pseudo-cleric, a rabbi, and an imam there to bless it all.  But Father sees much greater meaning in a performance that many just saw as strange, offensive, and gross.  It was a veritable recapping in ghoulish song and perverse dance of the descent of Christendom from its former glory through communistic materialism to the sexual revolution and now into neo-pagan violence, decadence, and self-degradation.  I forgot they had a huge picture of Bahomet on the screen and ultimately ended in Gaia-worship.  How sick.  That part of the sermon from roughly 18:30 – 27:00.  “The highway for hell has been opened for easy travel.”  Indeed.

Father, however, prophecies that we are poised for a great reversal from God.  Historically, however, we have to comprehend that several of these historical reversals entailed destruction on a national or even societal scale in order to clear away all the evil and set a path for restoration.  The fallen pagan order must cease to exist in order for the Reign of Christ to return.

I don’t want to steal all of Father’s thunder but it’s very well worth listening to.

FSSP Priest Interview Reveals Divisions within Fraternity April 25, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, Basics, foolishness, General Catholic, huh?, Latin Mass, priests, Restoration, Revolution, sadness, Society, SSPX, the struggle for the Church, Tradition.
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I got sent a link to the following post this morning by reader TT.  It’s an interview of the rather small German province of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter, the organization of priests dedicated to the traditional Mass that was founded by some who “broke away” from the SSPX at the time of the illicit consecrations of 4 bishops in 1988.

This interview is already being picked up as fodder for the endless (and tiresome) SSPX/FSSP debates that have been raging for almost 30 years.  For those who already feel the FSSP is hopelessly compromised, the interview is being taken as proof of the correctness of that view.  For those with internal knowledge of the Fraternity, as it is typically called, however, this interview only reiterates the divisions already well known within this society of priests.

I’ll add comments to the post I copy below, because I think there are some important things to clarify/note, but I’d like to make one point clear at the outset: every grouping of more than a few individuals is going to have disparity of belief.  Once you get into the hundreds, like the FSSP, there is going to be a whole range of belief.  Given that, generally speaking, both acceptance of a more stridently traditional outlook (or a certain, sometimes severe, hostility to Vatican II) and friendliness/sympathy for the SSPX varies inversely with the age of the priest and their closeness to the original point of division in 1988.  That is to say, older priests in the Fraternity, especially those who were present in 1988 and made the decision to leave the SSPX, generally tend to be more accommodating towards the post-conciliar ethos and hostile towards the SSPX.  Younger priests are generally more hardcore “traditional” and more friendly towards the Society.

This is not a universal rule and there is infinite nuance, even within individual priests!, but that’s probably the broad norm.  I would also add that there is, as I understand it, a certain division of belief between priests of the Fraternity in the Americas, and those in Europe, with those again in Europe tending towards being the less ardently traditional, or the more accommodating.  Having said that, I concur with a commenter at 1Peter5 that this is far from an inspiring interview.  While I think the interview is being presented in a fairly negative light by Maike Hickson at 1Peter5, I think I can also say these are some of the most unhelpful comments I’ve seen from an FSSP priest in print, perhaps less for what they say (esp. on reflection) but for the sense they seem to convey of accommodation, of being (to quote some commentary I’ve seen) “modernist lap dogs who will do anything so long as they can continue to offer the ‘old Mass'”.  Then again, I find myself defending the priest quite consistently below – I think that while he exhibits an attitude far different from what I’d like to see expressed, it’s not entirely surprising given his past.

So keep that in mind as you read the below, which many of you perhaps already have:

The usually cautious and reserved Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) has now given its current opinion concerning the Society of St. Pius X (SSPX) and on its possible formal re-integration into the structures of the Catholic Church. Father Bernhard Gerstle – the head of the German district of the FSSP – just gave a 24 April interview to the German Bishops’ official website Katholisch.dein which he explains many of the positions and opinions of his priestly fraternity. (Father Gerstle is the same priest who, in 2016, made a politely critical statement about the papal document Amoris Laetitia.) [An important note of clarification.  Fr. Gerstle may be the head of the German district of the Fraternity, but I think it a great leap to derive from that that he is speaking for the mind of the entire Fraternity.  Words of Fr. John Berg, former Superior of the entire order, in Latin Mass Magazine from 2015 (which I haven’t to hand) were far different and conveyed a far more traditionally Catholic understanding.]

Father Gerstle explains, first of all, that he himself split off from the SSPX because of the “illicit episcopal consecrations” in 1988 which, in his eyes, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger tried to forestall. (Interestingly, and just in the recent past, there have been voices saying that Cardinal Ratzinger, as pope, later removed the excommunications of the four SSPX bishops because he realized that he had contributed to the intensification of that earlier conflict. Worth noting is that, Bishop Athanasius Schneider, who has served as an official Vatican liaison to the SSPX, recently called this act of excommunication an “injustice.”) [This little aside causes me to wonder whether the author is not trying to inculcate a bit of doubt, even resentment, towards Fr. Gerstle.  Sure “some voices” may say that, but lots of others say that the excommunications were wholly right and just. Obviously Fr. Gerstle is going to have a bias since he left the SSPX over this matter.  I am curious as to why Hickson chose to introduce this seeming rebuttal right here.] In Gerstle’s eyes, the 1988 breach happened due to a “lack of trust toward Rome.” He also claims that many more priests within the SSPX had disapproved of the episcopal consecrations, “but did not make the final step.” Thus, there were “only a few priests and seminarians who left the Society of St. Pius X at the time [in 1988].” Gerstle explicitly says that the foundation of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter happened “essentially due to Cardinal Ratzinger, [who was] then head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.”  [For those of us who weren’t involved, I don’t think it is easy to comprehend the depth of feeling on both sides involved in the 1988 consecrations.  This was an event so trying and so radicalizing I don’t think many today fully realize the effect these events had on the participants.  As one who was directly involved and experienced that heart-rending time, I don’t find Fr. Gerstle’s comments out of place.  There are many involved who share his views, and of course, many who don’t, but it’s not like he’s breaching some radical new concept no one’s ever said before, even those who are very attached to the traditional practice of the Faith.]

Father Gerstle further distances himself from those smaller groups within the SSPX – whom he calls “hardliners” – who “reject the Second Vatican Council to a large extent, for example with regard to religious freedom or as to the decree on ecumenism.” Some of them, he says, also doubt the validity of the new liturgy. Gerstle makes it clear, moreover, where the Fraternity of St. Peter stands with regard to the Second Vatican Council: [No, he gives his own opinion.  Unless he directly stated he was speaking as the voice of the entire Fraternity as a matter of policy – which if he did, we can be certain Hickson would be trumpeting this from the rooftops – then he’s giving his opinion, which Hickson is taking to mean it is the policy of the Fraternity because of his position, but I can say from direct experience there are many Fraternity priests who do not conform to the views expressed in this para or the one below. As to the divisions within the SSPX, these are well known and I find pointing them out wholly unremarkable.]

The Fraternity of St. Peter, however, has accepted to study without prejudice the conciliar texts and has come to the conclusion that there is no breach with any previous magisterial statements.However, some texts are formulated in such a way that they can give way to misinterpretations. But, in the meantime, Rome has already made here concordant clarifications which the Society of St. Pius X should now also recognize. [Emphasis added] [I would say the situation now remains as it has been, vague, uncertain, and unclear.  Some tradition-friendly individuals in the Curia have made clarifications, they have expressed their opinions, but that is far from saying there has been a wholesale clarification of the problematic aspects of Vatican II. Rome appears willing to say almost anything to get the SSPX regularized.  But whether these stands hold after that occurs is anyone’s guess, but there remains a huge monolith of progressive-modernist opinion in the clergy and hierarchy that VII is perfect, the best expression of the Faith ever conceived, and that the Church was literally re-born in 1965.  That remains an extremely dangerous ideology that has not been washed away by a few conciliatory comments from folks at the Ecclesia Dei commission.]

Additionally, Father Gerstle insists that for the FSSP, the new 1983 Code of Canon Law is the standard. In his eyes, the SSPX has here some more reservations. For the FSSP, explains Gerstle “there is not a pre- and a post-conciliar Church.” “There is only the one Church which goes back to Christ,” he adds. Gerstle also insists that the FSSP does not “wish to polarize or even to promote splits,” but that they wish to instill in their own parishes “an ecclesial attitude.” Certain (unnamed, unspecified) abuses in the Church should only be criticized in a “differentiated and moderate way.” [We are only getting very partial and bifurcated comments.  I don’t read German so I can’t go to the original and Google translate is too unreliable in such fine points.  Having said that, I find these comments disappointing and far too conciliatory towards the post-conciliar construct.  Then again, we do not know what pressures the Fraternity is under right now, but I understand they are considerable and the dangers great from those who would like to do to the ED communities what has been done to the FI’s.]

Father Gerstle also distances himself from the concept “traditionalist” when he says: “This notion I do not like at all to hear. We are not traditionalists, but simply Catholic.” As Catholics, he says, “we appreciate tradition,” but without “completely blocking organic adaptations and changes.” [This one I have no problem with.  Some of the most informed readers of this blog eschew the term traditional, and say that what we practice is simply the Catholic Faith as it has always been believed, understood, and lived.  There is nothing remarkable about “organic changes” either.  VII was wholly inorganic.]

The worthy celebration of the traditional liturgy, together with a loyal teaching of the Catholic Faith, is at the center of the work of the FSSP, according to Gerstle. “Salvation of souls” and “eternal life” are their Fraternity’s own concern. Unfortunately, adds the German priest, “the Four Last Things have been widely neglected in the Church, with the effect of a belittling and attenuation of sin and of a loss of the practice of sacramental confession.” [I would hope this is uncontroversial.  In fact, one could take from this a tacit rebuke of the post-conciliar construct, where the Mass is typically deplorable and the “teaching” counterfeit.]

Father Gerstle sees that “one cannot simply introduce everywhere again the old liturgy and, so to speak, impose it upon people.” “Both rites thus [with the help of the “reform of the reform”] should enrich each other,” explains the priest. Certain elements of the new liturgy could be “enriching for the extraordinary form of the Roman Rite.” [He’s just parroting PBXVI here, but I am personally extremely leery of any “enrichment” flowing from the NO to the TLM.  I think there is virtually nothing in the NO that would “improve” the TLM.]

Moreover, Father Gerstle also explains that, in the German district, there are growing numbers of faithful who are interested in the traditional Tridentine Mass. Some of the FSSP Masses have “100 to 180 faithful” in attendance. He admits, however, that the FSSP has not too many vocations. “All in all we have a good number of incomers [16 new priests in 2016 and currently some 100 seminarians altogether], but it is not so that we are under pressure due to high numbers of vocations.” [The Fraternity is generally doing better in North America, where there is a certain pressure to grow the seminary.  As for Mass attendance, the local FSSP parish is now attracting 1200+ on a typical Sunday.  That is unusual, but the growth is consistent throughout, and I pray all the other tradition-oriented groups are experiencing the same or better.]

At the end of this interview, Gerstle explains that the SSPX faces a dilemma: either Bishop Fellay chooses unity with Rome and will have a split within his own organization, or he will choose unity within the SSPX and will not have unity with Rome.  The German priest explains, as follows:

I think that the current Superior General, Bishop Bernard Fellay, will have to decide between unity with Rome and unity within the Society of St. Piux X. The realists within the leadership will then hopefully realize that there is no alternative to a reconciliation with Rome.

I find the first part of this analysis to be insightful, but I think anyone who has followed the situation even as casually as I have has reached about the same conclusion.  I also think the second part is right, though I continue to have doubts as to whether now, with Francis in charge, is the right time.  The man has a demonstrated track record of deliberately targeting tradition-embracing groups for destruction.  But may God’s will be done.

As for the interview, this is absolutely not what I would prefer to see from a leading Fraternity priest.  But I’m not sure it confirms the fatal weakness of the Fraternity, either.  Does having a regular canonical status involve some compromise?  Absolutely*.  And folks in the SSPX had better be FULLY cognizant of that fact when they sign their “deal” with Rome.

Well I don’t post for a week then you get a novella.  Lucky you.  Sorry folks, posting is going to be infrequent for the foreseeable future.  I had a very  unusual situation for first 76 months of this blog’s history but that period is definitively order.  I probably would not have posted today if this matter hadn’t hit so close to home.  We’ve had a nightmare bronchitis/pneumonia go through our family that takes weeks to get over.  I’m still fighting it but am back at work but also playing lots of catchup.  Hope to get another post out tomorrow but who knows.

*-but so far, only of a limited and generally unobtrusive (or undamaging) sort.  The “gravitational pull” of an unreconciled SSPX probably plays a role in the limited nature of the compromises forced on the FSSP – which is why I fear regularization for the entire restoration of the Faith.  But ultimately God is in charge and we have to want what is best for the salvation of souls, which everyone (not really, but lots) tells me is regularization.  So it must be it.

Gentle Reminder: Switch from the Angelus to the Regina Caeli April 17, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, Liturgical Year, Our Lady, priests, religious, Restoration, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Victory, Virtue.
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I remembered this year, to start praying the Regina Caeli, as opposed to the Angelus, on Easter day.  Sometimes in the past, it’s taken me a day or three to remember.  I’m sure most of you have not had this problem, but if any have, here is your reminder.

To beef out the post a bit, a few pictures from Good Friday:

It was nice having a religious priest present during Holy Week

I pray you are enjoying this glorious Octave.  I think next year I will take off less time before Easter and more time after.  I’ve taken off most of Holy Week for years, but I feel ready for a change.  I’d like to enjoy the great feast more, and not just go back to work the day after Easter. I’ve always enjoyed that aspect of Christmas.  I wish I had the time to take off the entire week of Easter, but that’s not going to happen.  Oh for the days when working men had every great feast day off work, a true holy day holiday!

The Factual Case for Christ’s Crucifixion, Death, and Resurrection April 17, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Latin Mass, priests, sanctity, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Great sermon below.  I have a vague sense of posting this some years ago when I first heard it, but I can’t find it now.  Most likely, it will be new to you.

I really like how the priest points out the constant errors and failed declarations of modern science, which Dr. Edward Feser proved quite convincingly has evolved into a false religion of its own in his great book The Last Superstition.  Not only that, but Descartes, Bacon, and others, filled with rationalist hubris, deliberately contrived “science” as something which would always war against religion, since they posited, and managed to convince great scads of people with, the notion that “science” would, and could, only be concerned with the material, what could be weighed, measured, and/or directly observed.  In doing so, they set science on a radically different course from what it had held since ancient times, where theology was always regarded as the highest, or sacred, science.  Not only was this a radically different course, but one that would inevitably become hostile, and develop a cultus of its own that would demand acceptance of claims on faith from the vast, vast majority of people, including the scientists themselves.

Thus, while no one has ever come close to observing the “big bang,” it is held as a dogma today.  Evidence in support of the evolution of species is almost entirely inferential and open to argument, but argument is not permitted, lest one be called a science denier, or in a more ancient parlance, a heretic.  The almost constant failures of science, such as those described below, are conveniently forgotten, while evidence from thousands regarding religious events like the apparitions at Fatima are derided as mass hysteria or a pious hoax.

But the evidence, even in this proud, skeptical scientific age, for Christ’s life, death, and resurrection are overwhelming, as this priest notes below.  The vast preponderance of the evidence confirms that Christ lived, that He was crucified, that He was buried, and then rose again in spectacularly mysterious circumstances.  The Shroud of Turin continues to this day to be scientifically inexplicable, as no known technology today could have created the image of the Shroud, let alone that of 2000 years ago.  There is much, much more besides, in this excellent sermon which I believe dates (or is a repeat) from 2012 or 13:

Of course the tragedy of the Church today is that, to a degree never before seen in her history, the vast majority of self-described Catholics, whether lay, priest, or episcopate, doubt much or all of the Gospel account of Christ’s life, death, and resurrection.  Most, no matter how scientifically illiterate, accept the claims of science as a matter of faith, but have severe doubts as to whether Christ instituted the Eucharist in a literal sense, commands obedience to the Doctrine He has given us, fed the 5000, was resurrected, or even lived.  I have heard or read “priests in good standing” in Holy Mother Church express their disbelief on all of those realities, and many more besides.  I could easily segue to another subject, but I won’t go down that rabbit hole today.

The Church has weathered innumerable crises in her long history, but never before has she been so afflicted with such an enormous lack of faith, and lack of belief in core matters of Doctrine, as she is today.  It is a crisis of limitless proportions and shows little sign of abating, let alone resolving.  But God has worked miraculous recoveries in the past.  May He have the mercy on us to do so again.

Church Leftists Reach Endgame in Germany March 30, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, disaster, error, General Catholic, horror, It's all about the $$$, persecution, priests, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sickness, Society, unbelievable BS.
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Citing the very problems they and their leftist-modernist ideology have created by gutting the Faith of any transcendence and meaning, leader of the modernist faction Cardinal Karl Reinhard Marx declares that due to the absence of priests (and because this is what he and his cohort have always sought), German bishops will soon choose to make recourse to lay-run and administered parishes, while also hinting they plan on moving ahead with married priests, which means the Vatican will instantly follow.  The Vatican will follow, because, after all, the multi-billion dollar a year warchest the German bishops pilfer from mostly former Catholics is a source of funding too lucrative to ignore, and so whatever the sons of Luther German bishops want, the German bishops get:

German Cardinal Reinhard Marx plans to allow lay people in his archdiocese to run parishes in response to the priest shortage there and is also open to the possibility of married priests.

Cardinal Marx said parishes in the Archdiocese of Munich will have to be reorganized and current requirements for admission to the priesthood be reconsidered. The archdiocese has a Catholic population of more than 1.7 million but just one candidate for the priesthood this year. [Because the same leftist modernist ideology one can pursue while fully out in the world is a poor encouragement for men to take on a life of sacrifice and self-denial in the priesthood, at least until all the remaining disciplines and doctrines are jettisoned, and the former Catholic priesthood is reduced to a pathetic protestant shadow of its former self.]

“We are experiencing a great upheaval in the Church at the moment,” the cardinal said……… [As he bellowed an evil laugh and rubbed his fat hands with glee]

………Cardinal Marx said all of the possibilities were not yet thought through. He cited the “priesthood of all the faithful” and referenced the Second Vatican Council (Chapter 2, Lumen Gentium: “the common priesthood of the faithful and the ministerial or hierarchical priesthood are nonetheless interrelated”)………[I know some folks are uncomfortable with categorical statements regarding problems/errors/even worse within the Vatican II documents, but this kind of dangerously nebulous statement, left deliberately open to interpretation, was exactly the kind of thing that many opponents of the radical changes of Vatican II warned of, both at the time, and since.  This kind of statement was plainly an entre to desacralizing the priesthood and replacing it with some proto-Calvinist “presbyterial” construct.  And now we see exactly what was warned against playing out.]

……….Vocations to the priesthood have plungedin Germany in recent years. The drop has coincided with risingliberal reform to the Church by much of its hierarchythere[It’s not a “reform!”  It’s an attack, an undermining, a revolution, an attempted redefinition/re-creation, but it is not a reform!]

Only slightly more than half of the country’s priests avail themselves to the Sacrament of Confession  [wow],  and there is a concerted push for a loosening of the Church’s law on Communion for divorced and civilly remarried Catholics.

The German Bishops’ Conference has also promoted homosexual unions as a sacrament, published material in support of gender ideology, and advanced justification for same-sex “marriage.” The Conference voted in 2015 to permit its employees to publicly defy the Church’s moral teaching without putting their employment at risk.

The permanent council of the German Bishops’ Conference issued a formal statement in February approving access to Communion for Catholics living in adulterous unions without abstaining from sexual intercourse. The statement formalized the German Church’s dissent from Catholic teaching on Communion, Penance and marriage. [They also owned a major share of Germany’s largest porn publisher, and who knows, may well be among the nation’s most vigorous consumers of pornography.]

In response to the hotly contested question of Communion for Catholics living in objective sin during the two recent Synods on the Family, Cardinal Marx unequivocally stated that Germany would not be bound by the dictates of Church leadership. [not that it mattered, they bent the Church leadership to their whim.  They didn’t have to try very hard with Francis, but I’m sure the carrot of access to those billions they have stockpiled didn’t hurt.]

This post, and the previous one, seem appropriate content for reflection during this Novena of Our Lady of Sorrows.  I do not know if there has ever been a darker, more sorrowful time in the entire history of the Church.  Our Mother’s heart must be breaking, especially to see those men given such enormous graces totally rejecting any conversion and repentance in pursuit of their diabolical worldly agenda.  I do not think there has ever been such a mass betrayal by the Church leaders against their duty in the entire history of the Church.  Maybe during the Arian heresy, but those days were much more innocent, and many of those who glommed onto the heresy did not know what they were doing.  These men have 2000 years of Doctrine and Tradition to inform them, but they reject it out of hand, but somewhat in their defense were carefully taught to do just that.

Then again, millions of others were also formed in leftism/modernism and somehow managed to come to find, practice, and adore the authentic faith.  These men have had plentiful opportunities to do the same, it is a certitude they have been reached out to by faithful souls too many times to count, and  yet they have rejected the counsel and remonstrances they have received every. single. time.

I do pity these poor lost destructive men.  Not for the devastation they are inflicting on the Church and souls, but because they, too, will eventually be judged, and what a judgment they will face.  I imagine they will be quite shocked to find that God is indeed that God exactly described in that “bad old Faith” they manifestly reject.  By then it will be far too late.  They will have deserved their fate.

But mostly I pity the tens if not hundreds of millions of souls who face eternal perdition because they have fallen for the lies these men have peddled for generations now.  That’s the real tragedy in all this, the Church can always be restored, there can always be some great future Saints who will guide the Church back to sanity and sanctity, but the those who die holding these heresies and conducting their lives in manifestly immoral manner, their fate is fixed.  There is no hope of restoration or “renewal” for them.  And it is they who, finding many bishops and priests sharing their eternal destiny, will most torture these prelates with constant chastisements and rebukes.

So much to pray for, but men who have adamantly refused Grace for decades are very, very hard to reach.  Of course, all things are possible with God.

Join Father Jason Cargo on Rosary Walks in Richardson March 22, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Dallas Diocese, fun, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, North Deanery, Our Lady, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Continuing a tradition he began a year or two ago while pastor of Immaculate Conception Parish in Corsicana, Fr. Jason Cargo of St. Joseph parish in Richardson is conducting daily Rosary processions in public this Lent in order to evangelize and witness to our glorious Faith, in addition to rendering publicly the honor and glory rightly due to God.  You have to check Father’s Facebook page for the time and location, which varies from day to day as Father seeks to witness to as much of the city as possible.  Starting times and locations for this week are given below:

Thursday 3/23 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Friday 3/24 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Saturday 3/25 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Sunday 3/26 at 4:00 pm (Lookout Park)
Monday 3/27 at 4:30 pm (Ridgecreek Dr. and Bellview Court)
Tuesday 3/28 at 6:00 pm (Sherrill Park Golf Course)
Wednesday 3/29 at 5:30 pm (Ambleside and Pickwick)

YALE ELEMENT. is on Yale and Collins. meet at parking lot that faces Yale Park.

LOOKOUT PARK can be accessed off of Lookout Drive and Plano

Ridgecreek Dr. and Belleview Court is the intersection of two streets. Its in the neighborhood of Windmill stables off of Jupiter.

SHERRIL PARK GOLF COURSE – is accessed off of Lookout and Jupiter

Ambleside and Pickwick – can be accessed off of Renner and Owens

A nice video on the effort was put out by Texas Catholic, the diocesan media platform:

Good Father Cargo.  Rockin’ the cassock and cappa romana.  He is really a good priest.  I pray he is well received at St. Joseph and that his apostolate reach more and more souls.

I am really sorry I did find out about this sooner, as Lent is about half gone.  I suspected Father Cargo would take up this great work of mercy and faith since his reassignment to St. Joseph around Easter last year, but not being on Facebook I missed it until I saw about this on Youtube. That’s the second time today I’ve missed some big news because I’m not on Facebook.  But I’m setting up a reminder to check Father’s Facebook, which I can do without rejoining, next week to help get the word out.

If you have time and live or work in the Richardson/North Dallas area, consider joining Father on one of his “walks.”  They usually take about 45 minutes and cover 1 1/2 miles, praying all 15 decades of the Rosary.

I really like this kind of effort and it makes me feel rather ashamed I’ve let the prayer vigils outside strip clubs lapse.  As Father Cargo says, we never know what fruit giving such public witness of our Faith will yield – not only for those on the outside, but also for ourselves.  I pray that more priests take the time to do such good works.  Father Cargo is pastor of a huge parish but he is still prioritizing these efforts at evangelization.  May God bless him and all those who participate abundantly.

And please pray for him!  Our good priests are always especially under attack, from both the world and the devil and the fallen angels.  Pray Father is able to do all that good he wants to do, which is substantial.  He was very generous with me in something I was trying to do at one time and I shall not forget that.  Deo Gratias!

Image from Father’s Facebook, I pray he doesn’t mind.

Victory Attained: Our Lady of the Atonement San Antonio Made Part of Anglican Ordinariate – UPDATED March 22, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Ecumenism, episcopate, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, priests, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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With a hat tip to reader Camper for the link, Our Lady of the Atonement parish is, effective today, no longer a part of the Archdiocese of San Antonio and is now a part of Anglican Ordinariate, as the parish clergy and laity had requested.  I don’t know what this means for Fr. Phillips reinstatement, or whether that has already occurred (I could find no news attesting to this because I am not on Facebook!, where everything seems to be these days.  See update below, Fr. Phillips is back at Atonement with faculties in the Ordinariate), but I am certain there is great rejoicing today (but in actuality, there are signs the people of Atonement have been aware of the decision for at least a few days) among those who have such a great devotion to this reverent Anglican Use (and sometime Novus Ordo Latin) parish:

Brilliant News!!! The Holy See has directed that theTexan parish of Our Lady of the Atonement in San Antonio is, with effect from today, part of the Ordinariate of the Chair of S Peter, the American Ordinariate.

‘Atonement’ was the first (in 1983) of the parishes set up to perpetuate within the Roman Unity groups adhering to their Anglican Liturgy, Spirituality, and theological tradition. It was spectacularly successful, under its dynamic and charismatic Pastor Fr Christopher Phillips.

When the Ordinariates were set up, the position of parishes adhering to the ‘Anglican Use’, but operating as units within ordinary dioceses, became anomalous. After all, the Holy See had set up the Ordinariates specifically to include such communities.

The Archbishop of San Antonio was understandably anxious to keep such a vibrant parish and its academy within his own diocese and jurisdiction. But he is an honourable man. So he made it very clear that he would ensure the continuation at the Atonement of the provisions made by the Holy See for Anglicans who had entered the Catholic Church upon a certain understanding.

But that proposed arrangement misses the point. It treats the Anglican Use as merely something provided as a condescending kindness for ex-Anglicans or their descendants. This would mean that the Use could die out when the original ‘converts’ had died, unless new converts from Anglicanism had continued to trickle in so as to keep the arrangement on a life-support machine.

That is quite simply not how things can be allowed to be in a Church which takes Mission in any way seriously. A flourishing and orthodox Christian community will inevitably attract others, particularly those from the peripheries of the Church, where people may have a residual association with Catholicism but have grown disillusioned or alienated within the ‘mainstream’ or ‘diocesan’ Church.

It is a natural suspicion that Gerhard Cardinal Mueller has been involved in this wise decision, which is good news not only for the Atonement but for all members of the three Ordinariates. It demonstrates that the See of S Peter is as committed to Pope Benedict’s bold ecumenical experiment as ever it was. We were not ‘taken up’ just so that we could be ‘dropped’!

That’s certainly an ebullient opinion from Fr. Hunwicke, who I am certain is quite pleased.

This is about the best possible outcome for the vast majority of those associated with Atonement Parish and it’s school – this is very much what those souls wanted.  It also does lend some credence to notions I’ve heard bandied about that much of the furball that developed in recent months with the removal of Fr. Phillips and the allegations against Deacon Orr was ideologically motivated.  As I stated all along, that is most likely the case, though difficult to prove (as such things always tend to be in a Church dominated by secular modernists).

I’m very happy for the people of Atonement and the Archdiocese of San Antonio generally.  Whatever Phillips’ future status, they have one more reverent and relatively orthodox option for liturgy, catechesis, and formal schooling.  San Antonio is even more of a liturgical and catechetical wasteland than Dallas, which tells local readers something, anyway.  I don’t know whether it’s surprising or not that Rome made this decision, and so quickly, but it certainly appears to be the right and just one.

A Deo Gratias for Atonement parish and the good people of the Archdiocese of San Antonio.  I don’t know if this move has any implications for the TLM at St. Pius X parish or the SSPX at St. Joseph chapel, but we’ll see.  For now it appears the good guys won one for once, to quote some of those in the comments.

UPDATE:  Via commenter RM, the following comes from Fr. Phillips’ Facebook page, announcing his return as “pastor emeritus” at Atonement:

This has been an historic day. Our Lady of the Atonement is now a parish of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. Fr. Moore and I are incardinated as priests of the Ordinariate………

…………I return to the parish as Pastor Emeritus to carry on my regular pastoral, liturgical, and sacramental ministry, and especially what I love the most — back to my place in the school with our wonderful students.
“I am delighted with this! As I told some of our people today, “I get to continue to do all the things I love, and poor Fr. Perkins has to do all the hard stuff!”
“As of today we return to being the parish family we have always been, but poised for even greater adventures. I am grateful for our years in the Archdiocese of San Antonio — it was the soil in which we grew and flourished. But I am now looking forward to new relationships in the Ordinariate, and to serving God under a new bishop, His Excellency, the Most Reverend Steven Lopes

Well it appears this ugly saga is behind Atonement, and good for them.  With more coming out now, including what I am told privately is a dismissal of the allegations against Deacon Orr that surfaced earlier this month, it seems almost certain that what transpired in the removal of Fr. Phillips was the playing out of an ugly ideological agenda trying to keep a vibrant parish and its unusually valuable property from “leaving” the control of the Archdiocese, and in the process breaking the parish of most everything that made it unique.   Of course, as the progressive modernists holding the reins of power in most dioceses are extremely adept at manipulating the system to their advantage, proving that is all but impossible, but the strange turn of events in public really speaks for itself.

Msgr. Fenton on the False Ecumenism Since Vatican II March 15, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Ecumenism, error, General Catholic, manhood, priests, Revolution, scandals, secularism, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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While largely  unknown today, many consider Msgr. Joseph Clifford Fenton as the greatest theologian the United States has ever produced.  In the mid-20th century, he was a huge figure within the American Church, editing the premiere theological journal of the country and doing battle with the forces of modernism which were already becoming more and more bold in their efforts to redefine the Faith according to the “synthesis of all heresies” which they held.

Some of Fenton’s most pointed battles were against Fr. John Courtney Murray, SJ, a favorite of the Kennedy clan and the man who many consider to be the father of the Church’s post-conciliar ecumenical ethos.  Murray was especially influential in developing the Vatican II document Dignitatis Humanae, which discusses matters such as religious liberty and the necessity of the Church for salvation in truly unprecedented ways.  Unfortunately for the Church and millions of souls, while many observers felt that Fenton had clearly defeated Murray in their numerous theological engagements in the Catholic press, it was Murray whose influence was far more decisive at Vatican II. Once the Council turned decisively towards revolutionary sentiments in the first session, casting aside the years of previous work in the various schema that had been produced before the Council, and which had been championed by Cardinal Ottaviani and his staff of peritus (including Msgr. Fenton), Fenton’s influence on the Council waned as dramatically as did that of the deliberately publicly humiliated Ottaviani.

At any rate, the principle point of disagreement between Fenton and Murray, among others, was on the necessity of the Church for salvation and the paramount need for souls to be within that Church.  This spilled over into a closely related point: whether the American form of government with its “freedom of religion” (really, formally enshrined agnosticism as the state religion) was ideal, suitable, or even permissible for Catholics to support. Murray’s vision was much more Americanist in nature, not quite indifferentism but certainly close to what has become the reality in the post-conciliar Church.

In contrast, what we read below is fully in line with the Doctrine of the Faith as handed down through the ages, and fitted for the understanding of contemporary man.  I pray that one day the Church return not only to a full appreciation of Fenton’s work, but also to its implementation in a general reinstitution of classical scholastic theology.  The following excerpts come from The Church of Christ: A Collection of Essays by Msgr. Joseph Clifford Fenton, pp. 299-301. I add my own comments:

The anti-Catholic agitators are continually charging that Catholics are striving to do away with freedom of religion in the United States. [As for me, guilty as charged.]   In answering these men, some of our less skillful apologists [what a nice dig at Murray!]  become so confused that they actually give the impression that Catholics are completely and absolutely satisfied with the situation here in the United States today, that we believe it to be the best that many of our fellow citizens should remain as they are, apart from Our Lord, from His Church, and from His true religion.  Unmindful of the constant and devoutly sincere prayer of the Church that all of those who wander apart from ecclesiastical union and fellowship with Christ should be brought by God’s Grace into that fellowship, [A prayer repeated at every Good Friday in the TLM, but one which the vast majority of Catholics today have probably never heard] these writers describe as ultimately good and satisfactory a situation in which the nation itself takes no more cognizance of the true religion than it does of false systems of worship…….

……….We would by denying the force of that missionary charity within the Church, or misjudging the nature of the Church itself, were we in any way to give the impression that we do not care whether our fellow Americans enter the true Church or not.  The true religion is the great good which we desire for our fellow citizens and for our country.  The true Church, outside of which there is no salvation, is likewise a great and necessary good we seek for the men and the nation we love in the affection of charity.

………..The Vatican Council’s [That would be Vatican I] first dogmatic constitution, Dei Filius…..declares that “If anyone should say that the faithful and those who have never arrived at the only true faith are in a like situation, so that Catholics can have a legitimate reason for withholding their assent from and doubting, until they shall have completed the scientific proof of the credibility and the truth of their own faith, that faith which they have already received under the Church’s Magisterium, let him be anathema.” [Wow, a council that levels anathemas.  Wonders never cease.] The third chapter of this constitution declares that “those who have received the faith under the Church’s Magisterium can never have any legitimate cause for changing that faith or doubting it.” [Et tu, Francesco?]

………The thesis that the state or the civil society is objectively obligated to worship God according to the Rite of the Catholic religion thus stems basically from a realization of the fact that the debt of religion is a real obligation incumbent upon every human being and every social unit, and from a recognition of the truth that there is only one objectively acceptable religious worship, that which is paid to God within the framework of Our Lord’s Mystical Body.  This thesis is likewise in line with the fundamental principle of Catholic missiology, the truth that God wills that all men should enter His one true Church.  Thus it refuses to see as genuinely and ultimately desirable and good a situation in which some men, even though through no fault of their own, are not citizens of God’s supernatural kingdom on earth.

————End Quote————

Let me know if the excerpts don’t quite form a cohesive whole. I’m out of time and really wanted to get this post out but may have taken out a bit much “meat.”

The practical implementation of Dignatitis Humanae and the cult of false ecumenism it has engendered (for the only true ecumenism, contra the previous pontiff, is what he called “the discredited ecumenism of return” to the faith) is probably the second greatest wound to the Church unleashed in the decades since Vatican II, after Sacrosanctum Concilium.  The latter attempts to rip out her heart, the former, her mind.  No wonder the Church’s missionary efforts have totally collapsed in the years since.  They were intended to.  The revolutionaries – whether they intended to be or not – could not have chosen their targets better.  It is a bitter shame better men like Fenton did not succeed, but I have to accept that God allowed all this to come to pass, for some reason.

Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis.

 

 

Prayer for Self Control March 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, mortification, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Continuing in this impromptu Lenten series of prayers for establishing a holy and virtuous home life, a prayer/meditation on maintaining self-control at all times.

I am definitely of a quick tempered disposition.  I inherited many things from my father’s side of the family, many very admirable attributes, but this is probably one that is on the debit side.  My paternal grandmother said her father-in-law, my great-grandfather, was the meanest man she ever met.  My dad had a really hard time with his father, who was an extremely hard worker but also extremely demanding. I believe, Deo Gratias, there has been a certain process of mellowing from one generation to the next, but the tendency towards a quick temper – which subsides as quickly as it comes on – has remained.  Also, both my grandfather (lifelong farmer) and father (farm raised/construction/gas fields) were notorious abusers of the language, using foul words as a matter of course, and that’s been another bad habit I’ve struggled against.

That is to say, this prayer from Father’s Manual by Fr. A Coomes, SJ, is something I can really appreciate.  It would be ideal, I guess, if readers could say “this is definitely not a problem for me!,” but I tend to doubt that’s the case.  Note, tendency towards excessive anger is not the only area of self-control addressed, but in raising a whole bunch of kids, it is often among the most prevalent:

Lord Jesus, You told us to learn of  You because You are meek and humble of heart. Teach me Your way of meekness that I may control my mind, my heart, and my tongue.

Give me the manly calm and self-control needed to be an example and inspiration to my family.

Help me to be a considerate husband – to be a true comfort to my wife……..and never quarreling or peevish.  May I be at all times sympathetic, and may my words never be bitter to bring her sorrow.  May I always be understanding, unselfish, and thoughtful in sharing with her the family problems we experience.  Let me be ready to conciliate differences with understanding and never be domineering.

Teach me to be a patient father to my children, inspiring them always by word and example.  May my words always be words that direct and help them, and never words that wound.  When I must correct them, let it not be in anger. And, if I must be firm in my corrections, let me never be crude or harsh.

Let me never use rude or impatient words before my wife and children, nor display an uncontrolled or ill-considered action, which must certainly be a reproach to me afterwards when I contemplate the gentleness and calm of your meek and humble heart.

Finally create in me a spirit of true familial leadership, where I embody all the virtues necessary in a father, husband, and head of the domestic church entrusted to my care.  May I display none of the vices of selfishness, pride, indifference, or failure of leadership. May I in all things lead my family according to Your holy will, for which I will be judged most severely at my death.  May my wife and children submit to my role as leader of the family entrusted to me with willingness and humility.

Please bless our family abundantly and provide us with a joyful and happy Christian home.

———End Quote———

It is a great challenge, adequately balancing proper leadership and necessary firmness with the optimal levels of gentleness and deference.  These days, the great impediment to being a good father and husband is selfishness and carelessness, as we see so commonly in the cultural presentations of oafish, self-serving, uninvolved fathers.  Of course the culture of divorce has a very great deal to do with that.

Even among some traditional priests and laity, however, there seems almost a bias at times against strong leadership which is sometimes slandered as severity, a certain – I am positive it is unintentional – trepidation about fathers going “too far,” or encouragements to fathers towards excessive deference.  There is also sometimes a subtle undermining of the father’s role, in presenting the “ideal” father as meek to the point of emasculated, or gentle to the point of milquetoast.

That does not mean I have not seen very well intentioned Catholic fathers who have perhaps gone a bit too far towards clarity, strength, and decisiveness, which may manifest as a certain tendency towards severity.  As I said, it’s a very difficult balance, but in my limited experience and reading the great mass of deficient fatherhood is on the other side, towards laxity or loss of leadership, both among fathers/husbands who perform their God-given role poorly either due to indifference or lack of knowledge (perhaps more common), and due to the undermining of the father’s/husband’s role by society and, much more destructively, by some of those who should be supporting and upholding that role with all their strength.

This leaves aside the very difficult situation many fathers/husbands face, which is dealing with attempts to usurp their rightful role from within the family itself. This is a very common problem and is found within the most outwardly devout families.  Many women have absorbed some of the noxious ideas floating about in the culture, most of the time unconsciously. Some pious mothers are unaware of how they may be, largely unintentionally, undermining their husband or attempting to subvert his leadership.  Certain priests seem to have a hard time strongly supporting fathers in the face of tearful outbursts in their office or confessional.

All this is to say, the challenges are manifold, especially at this time, though many of these have always existed.  I read a book from a priest written in the 19th century that decried many of these same problems.  Hopefully this prayer will go some way towards overcoming these challenges.  I am looking for a similar prayer intended for mothers and children to aid in their subordinate role in family life, something that is so radically countercultural in these days many have a hard time accepting it.  Generally speaking, in the broader Western world, the overwhelming deficit of virtue and action is on the side of men.  In the much tinier pious Catholic subset, however, the problems are more evenly balanced.

I’ve wandered far enough abroad.  If I keep this up, it’ll be the only post you get today, so I’ll stop.  At root, the best I can do is for all to look to the Holy Family for guidance.  Fathers, look to St. Joseph, mothers, look to Our Lady.  Our Lady never sinned, was preserved free from sin by an act of Grace, and yet she submitted to her husband in all things.  Fathers emulate St. Joseph’s kindness, love, strength, masculinity, and virtue.  I have found you cannot model yourself on St. Joseph, nor ask for his intercession, too much.