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Wonderful Developments, Liturgical and Otherwise, at St. Mark Parish in Plano January 31, 2020

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, Eucharist, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, North Deanery, priests, Restoration, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership.
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He lives!  Sorry for the long absence.  I even missed the 10th anniversary of the blog by a month and a half.

But something important has come up.

I have known the young pastor of St. Mark parish in Plano, Texas, since he was a newly ordained priest.  We were always gratified to see him wearing the occasional cassock and frequent Roman chasuble.  He even wore black at funeral Masses.  I figured we could expect great things from him.

This good priest, Fr. Marco Rangel, had some other assignments in the intervening 10 or so  years, but last year he was assigned as the pastor of St. Mark in Plano.  He has made a number of changes that I believe almost all devout Catholics will find most positive.

First, St. Mark, god bless it and whatever its merits, I don’t think has ever been anyone’s idea of a brilliant architectural and artistic achievement.  A sunken sanctuary with stadium seating and bare concrete and stucco walls, it at least did have one very large stained glass window, and a nice, traditional crucifix (which the former pastor, Fr. Cliff Smith, is to be thanked for fighting for.  He caught surprising flak for replacing the touchdown Jesus, Christ rising on the cross “crucifix” with a far more tasteful,a nd I would say, accurate and Catholic one).  However, Fr. Rangel has made a number of changes, which you can see below.  Most photos were taken during Christmas, which of course includes additional decorations, but most all the paintings and statuary are new.  The angels kneeling in adoration next to the tabernacle are definitely new, and so welcome, as is the Benedictine arrangement on the altar.

The before:

Some initial changes:  Small but noticeable:

The full monte:

Changes to the Eucharistic adoration chapel:

I’m amazed at the improvements these changes have made.  Some – like the addition of the statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe – were made under Father Smith, but most have been made under Father Rangel.

Next, there are major liturgical improvements underway.  Father Rangel offered Mass partially in Latin during Advent and on Christmas, and will do so again during Lenten Sunday Masses.  This included the propers and Gloria in Latin as appropriate, as well as organ music and Gregorian chant.  Father Rangel intends to continue adding more and more reverent aspects to the Liturgy and is open to even becoming bi-ritual, should interest warrant such a move.

And that’s one of the purposes of this post, not only to apprise of these positive developments, and prove I am still alive, but also to ask readers here in the Diocese of Dallas to send a letter of support to Bishop Burns for authentic, orthodox liturgical improvements, the Traditional Latin Mass, and Father Rangel in particular.  Whether  you attend St. Mark or not, if you desire to see liturgy more in keeping with the constant belief and practice of the Church, this is a great opportunity to show both your interest and your support for a local priest who is taking large steps in that direction.  Of course, Father Rangel has encountered a great deal of resistance, so he could use all the support he can get.  This kind of support can be vital in determining how a bishop may respond to these kinds of initiatives made on the part of pastors. I thus implore all local readers, and even interested non-local ones (you should indicate whether or not you reside in the Diocese), to contact both Bishop Burns and Father Rangel.  I provide some form letters below, which you are free to use.  It is quite a risk for a priest to make changes like this, and at this pace.  Father Rangel has not been pastor at St. Mark for even a year, yet, I do not believe.

This also ties in with changes in catechesis and sacramental preparation at St. Mark, which is my final point.  Father Rangel is working to revamp the materials used in these vital areas, to be in accord with timeless, unchanging Church teaching which goes back to the Apostolic Deposit of Faith, and not just the current theological experimentations presently in vogue.

Letters should be sent to:

Bishop Edward Burns
Catholic Diocese of Dallas
3725 Blackburn St.
Dallas, TX, 75219

A sample letter is included below, just as an idea.  Feel free to compose your own:

Dear Bishop Burns –

Greetings in Christ! I have been apprised of the very positive liturgical, architectural, and catechetical improvements made by Father Marco Rangel of St. Mark parish in Plano, Texas, and I am writing to indicate my wholehearted support for these efforts.  Father Rangel is moving the liturgy at St. Mark to be very reverent and to offer great glory and honor to God.  His artistic and liturgical changes are in keeping with the great patrimony of our Holy Mother Church, and unite our worship with that of millions of Catholics through years past.  His changes incorporating more Latin, Gregorian chant, and great reverence for the Most Blessed Sacrament are all very edifying and are bringing great benefit to many souls.  We implore your eminence to support Father Rangel in this new direction for St. Mark.

I would also like to include in this letter a request for regular Traditional Latin Masses (TLM) in the north deanery of the Diocese of Dallas, most particularly in the Plano/Richardson area.  At this point, St. Mark and Father Marco Rangel would appear to be the most suited for offering this ancient and beautiful form of the Mass, but St. Joseph in Richardson may also be a strong candidate.

We thank you for your continued leadership of this diocese, and  for the many blessings and benefits this leadership has brought.  We pray your leadership, and that of good priests like Father Rangel, will continue to bring glory to God and aid in the sanctification of all the souls in  the Diocese of Dallas.

God bless and keep you,

Name

In all likelihood it will be Bishop Kelly that reads these and responds, but the message will hopefully get through to Bishop Burns.

I also implore you to send letters of support and thanks to Father Rangel at St. Mark.  He can be reached at:

(Pastor) Father Marco Rangel
St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church
1105 West 15th Street
Plano, TX 75075

Another sample:

Dear Father Rangel –

Greetings in Christ!  I have learned of late that you are in the process of making numerous liturgical, artistic, and catechetical improvements to St. Mark.  May God reward you!  This is such a happy and blessed development, and will surely bring enormous fruit to souls.   I support you in your efforts to bring more  reverence to the Mass and to bring St. Mark’s liturgical, artistic, and catechetical practice more in union with the great patrimony of our Holy Mother Church.  I am so grateful that some of the fruit of the “reform of the reform” is beginning to blossom in Plano.

I would also like to indicate my interest in having a regular Traditional Latin Mass (TLM) at St. Mark.  I reside in the Diocese of Dallas/North Dallas/Collin County area and would be overjoyed to have a TLM closer to my home and/or place of business, particularly at St. Mark.  If you are assessing the level of interest in this form of the Mass in the Plano area, please be assured of mine, and that of my family.

May God continue to bless and support your apostolate in every way,

Name

Father Rangel can also be reached at pastor@stmarkplano.org.

If at least 12 of you do not contact Father Rangel with support, I’ll never post again.   Like that’ll be any different!

The Episcopate of the United States Catholic Church Has Always Been Americanist, Indifferentist, and even Heretical November 15, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Dallas Diocese, disaster, episcopate, error, General Catholic, history, Immigration, priests, Revolution, scandals, secularism, sickness, Society, the struggle for the Church.
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I mentioned recently I have been reading books by Solange Hertz.  They are very valuable and enlightening reading, providing great insight into how the almost universally rock-solid Church of the 18th century became the structurally modernist, indifferentist, and leftist body that it is today.

Reading Hertz has been part of a broader study I’ve been blessed to make over the course of much of 2019, reading histories of the Church over the period 1800-1950, principally in the  United States but also Europe.  This is history that is almost entirely forgotten, and deliberately so, as it reveals the means and methods by which the Church was first penetrated, and then overtaken, by revolutionary forces.  While many faithful Catholics today point to AA-1025 and communist penetration of the Church in the first half of the 20th century, to be frank, that analysis misses the mark.  In point of fact, most of the damage was done in the 19th century, and came not from European revolutionaries (they more or less took advantage of an already existing situation), but from American ones.

American, ahem, Catholics, were responsible for much of the most destructive beliefs that burst into open view, with apparent approbation of the institutional hierarchy, at Vatican II.  Indifferentism (rejection of Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus), almost a maniacal focus on both materialism and ecumenism, the exaltation, if not practical worship of, democratic forms of government and the free market, tacit endorsement of blasphemy and sacrilege under the guise of “freedom of speech” and “freedom of expression”………..all these ideas came primarily from the United States and, it must be said, mostly Irish-lineage bishops and priests, though they did find fertile ground for these ideas throughout much of Europe.

A few datapoints to illustrate.  The first American bishop, John Carroll, was a thoroughgoing Americanist, practically seeking to create an Americanist Gallist Church (a national church free from Rome’s influence).  He practically worshipped the US Constitution and the American state and was influenced, to an almost unbelievable degree for a man who called himself Catholic, by the liberal wing of the protestant sects in the United States. He was also extremely close with the freemasons who dominated the American elite.  He insisted, for instance, on the election of bishops, and even wanted election of priests, to go along with a vernacular liturgy and many other items protestants/masons would like to see changed regarding Church Doctrine.  He was only just prevented from doing this by intervention from Rome, and his death.

Carroll also did all he could to upset and frustrate attempts by the constant waves of immigrants to maintain their traditional Church structures and parish lives within their own communities.  Carroll and his disciples waged constant war against German, Polish, Italian, and other priests and lay people who sought to maintain the traditions of the Faith from Europe. They insisted all immigrants should be swiftly and thoroughly “Americanized,” bowing to the unique genius of the Constitution and the American(ist) way of life.

Thus, the tragic situation we see today, where the US episcopate demands unconstrained immigration in order to make up for the falling away of tens of millions of Catholics, has persisted throughout the Church’s history in this country.  In the latter half of the 19th century, 25-30% of recent Catholic immigrants fell away from the Faith within 25  years of arriving in the US.  Most became some flavor of protestant.  This has been the regular reality of Catholic life in these United States, save perhaps for the brief period of the 1920s to the 1950s when the Catholic Church appeared much more orthodox, reliable, and robust compared to its rapidly collapsing mainline protestant counterparts.  This was about the only period in US history when, subtracting immigration, there was a net inflow of converts into the Church, as against Catholics falling away.

The following quote sums up the situation in Amchurch circa 1900 rather nicely, from The Star-Spangled Heresy: Americanism, pp. 186-188 (I add comments):

…[D]efenders of the Faith had little difficulty linking Americanism to communism, not to mention Semitism, Protestantism, Masonry, and outright Satanism. A Catholic paper in Paris accused Cardinal Gibbons [I haven’t even touched on Gibbons, but he is perhaps the principal villain in the Americanist story] of partiality to masonry on the basis of his persistent defense of such organizations as the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias……….all condemned by Rome, and of secret societies generally in the States. The French Canadian Jules Tardivel dubbed America “the eldest daughter of the sect,” and Leo XIII’s Belgian biographer stated its true center was located here.

In 1899  Leo XIII was finally forced to write Testem Benevolentiae condemning Americanism specifically as a heresy.  In the face of the threatened withdrawal of American support for Peter’s Pence, however, [the American Church, like the German Church today, routinely used its massive financial resources to threaten Rome with denial of funds – and this, at a particularly critical time when the Papal States had been stolen by Garibaldi and the Church was in desperate financial straits] none of the heretics was designated by name, although everyone knew who they were and had expected them to be formally excommunicated. Robert Cross relates that one Roman periodical, referring to the “satanic spirit” of America, exclaimed: “Put the mask aside, O Monsignor Ireland: bow down before the Vicar of Jesus Christ, Cardinal Gibbons, and deny the blasphemous theories of the heretical sect which are embodied in you!” Civilta Cattolica dubbed the heresy:

…….purely American…….employed at first to indicate in general the ‘new idea’ which was to rejuvenate the Church, and in particular the ‘new crusade’ against the uncompromising position of Catholics of the ‘old creed.’

All the heresiarchs loudly disclaimed being tainted by what they termed a ‘phantom heresy’ existing largely in the minds of the Curia or at best in a few French dioceses, and they continued on as before. [Indeed – an encyclical sent to the lead American cardinal, talking only about the United States, only applied to a few foreign dioceses, and those strangely French.  But do we not see the exact same kinds of dissembling tactics today, especially in the US episcopate?] The American flag was displayed ever more prominently at altar-side, as if also intended for worship, despite the frowns of Rome, which steadfastly refused approval for the tricolor within the sanctuary.  Episcopal progress in socialism was steady. At the close of the First World War the American bishops under the leadership of Msgr. John Ryan became so convinced that “so-called  ’socialistic’ measures were practically synonymous with Catholic moral principles” – to quote a popular Catholic history textbook – that they boldly embarked on their own social program. Advocated were minimum wage legislation, unemployment and old age insurance, prohibition of child labor, legal protection of unions, national employment service, public housing for workers, control of monopolies, curtailment of ‘excess’ profits, participation of labor in management and wider distribution of stock ownership.  Christ was now harnessed to the Revolution as to His Cross. [These efforts were through the “National Catholic War Council,” supposedly set up to help fight WWI, but then extended after the war as the National Catholic Welfare Conference. The first permanent episcopal conference in Church history, it was banned by Pius XI but later, of course, was given approval at Vatican II, where the Church awoke and groaned to find itself Americanist.  Of course, episcopal conferences have turned into  charnal houses of sex abuse, graft, larceny, and radicalization political agendas, along with constantly reducing the Faith to the lowest possible common denominator, in concert with ‘right democratic principles.’]

……[I]n 1928 indulgent America permitted a Catholic, Al Smith, to run for the Presidency for the first time in the nation’s history. Ten years later in Madrid the anti-Catholic writer George Seldes was able to say in The Catholic Crisis:

The future of Catholicism may lie in America because of the growing Catholic population, the large increase of bishoprics, the financial support of the Church which is said to be larger than that contributed by the rest of the world.  But it may lie in America because America is the stronghold of democracy. American Catholicism is the Catholicism of the famous credo of Al Smith……which states that the Syllabus of Pius IX which is anti-liberal, anti-democratic, and in a way anti-American, has ‘no dogmatic force’ as Cardinal Newman said long ago……..[I hope Cardinal Newman did not say that.  I don’t know]

By the Smithian system of dialectics no Catholic need fight Socialism, or Communism, or pay any attention to Rerum Novarum, Quadragesimo Anno, Casti Connubii, Lux Veritatis, or the late Pope’s utterances in favor of Franco’s Spain, if he individually disagrees.  The American Catholic, according to its most important spokesman, can take it or leave it. [The primacy of the individual conscience, circa 1930!] However, no Catholic outside the United States has ever expressed the same views and remained in the Church.

Thus, the Americanist heresy is at the root of the crisis in the Church, and contrary to the relatively conservative body most Americans are propagandized to believe it is, has been one of the key driving forces behind the revolution against the Church conducted principally by those given sacred trust to promote and defend the authentic Faith.  Unfortunately, Americanism is deeply rooted in the basic patriotism of the United States, and so constantly finds new adherents.  It’s a difficult and tragic thing to find one at odds with one’s country, but that is exactly the position thinking, informed, believing Catholics find themselves in.  That this nation has produced so precious few of that group only demonstrates how insidiously effective that propaganda is.

They have now. Apparently, As Bishop O’Gorman once wrote his friends from Rome, “Americanism, which was supposed to be our defeat, has been turned into a glorious victory. We are surely on top.” The lucrative waters of the Potomac were now flowing freely into the Tiber. Only a faithful few in the US today recall that their Lord “suffered under Pontius Pilate,” after Pilate and the “religious” Herod became friends. “If they have persecuted Me, they will also persecute you…….The servant is not greater than his master.” And “no man can serve two masters” (Jn xvi:20).

Mindful of this difficulty, Hilaire Belloc predicted the “necessary” conflict between the civil state and the Catholic Church in America. He said in so many words, of course, “the Catholic Church in America.” He was not referring to the star-spangled “American Catholic Church” which is after all only a modernist sect of long standing, with a large growing membership. No conflict with Pilate should arise there. [Since, after all, for Cardinal Gibbons and most current and historical American bishops, their greatest fear was and is that they might ever give offense to the protestant majority, and especially the formerly protestant but now thoroughly secularized and leftist political-cultural elite.]

————End Quote————-

This post is already very long, and I hope to get out one much shorter post today, but I’ll conclude with this: it is a profoundly unsettling realization to make, that one’s Faith, and one’s country and culture, are totally at odds.  It is even more discomfiting to realize that, in many ways, only one can ultimately survive.  It was, of course, fear of this realization that drove the thoroughly American bishops and priests (again, most all of them, strangely enough, Irish) to attempt to posit a typically American ‘new and improved’ church, one that fit in fine with the surrounding culture and political landscape, one that wouldn’t make any waves, and one that would rarely, if ever, expose its practitioners to persecution.

But Our Blessed Lord told us that if we love Him, the world will hate us, and that if we are faithful, it will persecute us like it persecuted Him.  This is the narrow path of salvation.  The Church in the US, by and large (there were numerous countervailing elements, especially German), chose the wide, soft, easy road.

We all know how those two stories end.

Saint Alphonsus on the Proper Hearing of Mass November 11, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, reading, Saints, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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From Volume XV of Saint Alphonsus Ligouri’s Ascetical Works, Preaching (only get the translations by Father Eugene Grimm, CSsR, the others are markedly deficient and full of modern errors and radical changes to Saint Alphonsus crystal-clear theology), an exhortation on the proper hearing of Mass, including what constitutes, in the Saint’s mind, irreligious and even sinful hearing of Mass:

Before I begin the excerpt, I should note that the section below regarding not going to Confession during Mass does not mean Sacramental Confession, which is of course not only permitted but encouraged during Mass or any other time, but the “implicit Confession” of the Confiteor.  Alphonsus is saying that if you have some grievous sin on your conscience, Mass does not remove the guilt of that sin, and explicit sacramental Confession must first be sought before assisting at Mass (this could of course be ongoing during Mass, but certainly before receiving Communion).

How should one hear Mass?

To satisfy the obligation of hearing Mass, two things are necessary: an intention and attention.

It is necessary to have an intention of hearing Mass, so that a man who is force into church against his will, or who enters only to look about him and see the place (NB: as many tourists do during Mass at famous churches throughout Europe), or to wait there for a friend, or for any other purpose except hearing Mass, does not fulfil the obligation.  But, should a person hear Mass through devotion, believing that the day is not a holiday, he is bound, when he finds that it is a holiday, to hear another Mass?  No; it is enough to have done the work commanded without having adverted to the intention of fulfilling the precept of hearing Mass.

It is necessary to hear Mass with attention – that is, to attend to the Sacrifice that is celebrated.   This attention may be external and internal.  It is certain that a person who hears Mass without external attention does not fulfil his obligation; for example, if during the Mass you are asleep, or are drunk, or are employed in writing, talking, or other external operations, you do not fulfil the precept of hearing Mass.

It is disputed among theologians whether a person who attends Mass without internal intention satisfies his obligation’ that is, if he sees what is going on, but is at the same time distracted, and employed in thinking not on God, but on other things.  Many theologians say that he is guilty of a venial, but not a grievous, sin, as often as he is voluntarily distracted, and that he fulfils the substance of the precept because he hears Mass with a moral presence. But the greater number of theologians, following St. Thomas, teach that such a person does not fulfil the obligation of hearing Mass, namely, when he is conscious that he is distracted, and not attending to the Mass, and positively wishes to continue in his distractions.

Hence I exhort you, in hearing Mass, to reflect on the great Sacrifice which is being offered. Meditate on the Passion of Jesus Christ; for the Mass is a renewal of the Sacrifice that Jesus Christ offered on the cross. Or meditate on some eternal truth – on death, judgment, or hell. Let him who knows how to read make use of some little book, or let him recite the office of the Blessed Virgin……..say the Rosary, or some other vocal prayers: let them, at least, attend to what the priest is doing.

Does a person who makes his confession during Mass satisfy the obligation of hearing Mass?  No; for then he would attend it as a criminal accusing himself of his sins, and not as a person offering sacrifice; and it is certain that all who hear Mass offer sacrifice along with the priest.

Hence it would be advisable during Mass to offer the Holy Sacrifice for the ends for which it was instituted: adoration, contrition, thanksgiving, and supplication.

During the Mass, then, we ought, first, to offer to God the Sacrifice of His Son in honor of His Divine Majesty; secondly, in thanksgiving for all the benefits we have received from him; thirdly, in satisfaction for our sins; and fourthly, to implore of God, through the merits of Jesus Christ, the graces necessary for our salvation.  At the elevation of the Host, let us ask God to pardon our sins, for the sake of Jesus Christ, and at the elevation of the chalice, let us beg of God, through the merits of that Divine Blood, the gift of His love and holy perseverance. And during the Communion of the priest, let us make a spiritual Communion, saying: My Jesus, I desire to receive Thee; I embrace Thee: do not permit me to ever be separated from Thee.

———————-End Quote———————

No special message in this post, just some hopefully helpful reminders and exhortation to even better devotion and practice at the source and summit of our Faith, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

Highlight from First Pontifical High Mass in Dallas Diocese in over 50 Years October 24, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Probably quite well over.  I don’t know when Bishop Gorman offered the last Pontifical High Mass, but it had to be before 1969.

The Mass was wonderful.  I had never assisted at one before, and didn’t know quite what to expect, but it was essentially a Solemn High Mass with additional elements according the presence of a bishop.  It lasted about 2 1/2 hours including the introductory processing in of Bishop Schneider and the additional prayers he made before vesting.  It was very beautiful. We arrived an hour early and queued up to get seats in our too small parish church.  Even though there an hour early, there were easily 200 people in line in front of us.  So, we sat towards the back.

Unfortunately, I forgot my phone (after deliberately leaving it charging right by the door specifically so I would NOT forget it) and I had to use my wife’s, which……….is set up very different from mine, had no memory left, and was also low on power.  So, with the pics and video, you get what you get.  Complaining won’t solicit any more, though if you’re on Facebook I think the parish will have professionally shot photos and videos of the event there.  My rather poor stuff below:

Processing in:

Preliminaries, vesting:

Part of the sermon on the life of Blessed Karl:

Recessional 1:

Recessional 2:

A number of photos from the Mass:

WordPress seems to not be liking many of my pics and refuses to upload them.  I may try again later, but I only have so much time and have other topics I’d like to get to today.

Ligouri: The Ruin of Souls Who Through Shame Omit to Confess Their Sins October 3, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Interior Life, priests, reading, Sacraments, sadness, scandals, Tradition, Virtue.
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In light of this post from last week, I recently read the following excerpt from one of Alphonsus Maria de Ligouri’s great Ascetical Works and it was a perfect treatise on the matter of invalid confessions, and reasons for them.  Of course, Saint Alphonsus is the great Moral Doctor of the Church.  He is widely considered to be the single greatest authority on moral theology in the Church’s 2000 year history.

One hugely important post I failed to make in last week’s postfor a confession to be valid, EVERY mortal sin, in kind and number, committed since the last VALID confession, MUST be conveyed to the priest, or the confession is invalid, and every subsequent reception of the Blessed Sacrament in this foul state is sacrilegious and, in itself, a mortal sin, as was the original invalid confession.  Thus, if someone were to string out a long history of mortal sins over, say, 10 confessions, he would subsequently have to confess those 10 invalid confessions, and the 10 or 50 or 70 sacrilegious communions in the interim.  In fact, the longer a sin remains unconfessed for reasons of shame, the less likely it is that it will ever be confessed.  Thus, it is always best to confess all sins as soon as possible, both to alleviate the threat of damnation, but also to strike while the positive effects of shame are motivating the soul to seek forgiveness of its greivous offenses against God.

Saint Alphonsus repeatedly declared that more souls are lost through shame and subsequent invalid confessions than virtually any other reason.  Many Saints personally related mystical experiences of souls of the damned who lamented their sacrilegious, invalid confessions.

Now, the great moral Doctor, Ligouri (excerpts from pp. 316-317):

In the missions we should moreover strongly and often inculcate the necessity of overcomign the shame that one feels in confessions one’s sins.  Those who are experienced missionaries know that this cursed shame has been the cause of the loss of innumerable souls………

It is a pity to see how many souls the devil gains by this means, especially in matters concerning impure sins; for he makes th em lose shame at the moment of committing them, and gives this shame back to them when there is qustion of mention ing them in the confessional.  Saint Antoine, speakign of this matter, relates that a holy hermit, seseing one day the devil in the church going among those that wished to confess, asked him what he was doing there: the evil spirit answered: “To induce thse people to commit sin, I have taken shame from them; now I return it to them in order that they may not confess well and properly.”  Saint John Chrysostom also sayhs: “God has given shame to the commission of sin, and confidence to the confession of it. The devil inverts this: he inspires him who sins with confidence before the sin, and with shame afterwards, so that the sin may not be confessed and the soul lost forever.”

Alas! Christian soul, you have sinned; if you do not confess your sins you will certainly be damned. Why then do you not confess your sin?  You answer: “I am ashamed.” Hence, rather than overcome this shame you wish to be condemned for all eternity to the fire of hell? It is a shame to offend so good a God Who has created us; it is not a shame to confess to have offended Him.  But since you do not wish to manifest your sin, refrain at least from going to confession.  To the sin that you have committed do you wish to add the sacrilege of a bad confession?  Do yo know what you are doing when you commit sacrilege?  For the sins on accou nt which you have deserved hel there is no other remedy than the Blood of Jesus Christ, who will purify you if you confess it well; but by concealing your sin, you even tread under foot the Blood of Jesus Christ……….

……….What do you fear?  Ah!, here are no doubt the pretexts that the devil suggests to you, to keep you from confessing:

  1. What wil my confessor say when he hears that I have fallen in such a way?  Well, he will say that you have been weak, as happens to so many others who live in this world; he will say that you did wrong to sin, but that you afterwards performed and admirable deed in overcoming shame to confess your sins.
  2. At least he will not fail to give me a scolding! – oh no, why should he scold you?  Know that confessors cannot have greater consolation than when they hear a person accusing himself of a sin that he has committed; for then he can securely absolve him and deliver him from hell.
  3. I have not enough confidence to manifest this sin to my spiritual Father – Well! Go to confession to another priest of the place or to a stranger.

 

————-End Excerpt————–

Really, folks, your not that special, nor half as “bad” as you think.  The priests have heard it all.  If you go to Confession on Sunday at a busy parish, the priest might hear 80 or 100 confessions that day.  They all run together.  God gives priests special graces to forget what they hear in the confessional.  Most priests, most all the time, literally forget what they heard just moments ago in the confessional.  So don’t worry so much, trust God, and just spill it all.  Kind/type, and number.

The absolutely vital point to remember, is that, no matter what a foolish priest may tell you, you cannot receive the Blessed Sacrament with one unconfessed mortal sin on your soul!  If you do you commit another and worse mortal sin, the sin of profaning the Blessed Sacrament, and, many moral theologians maintain, literally re-crucifying Christ.

 

 

Diocese News: Good Father Paul Weinberger Reassigned from St. William in Greenville to St. Monica in Dallas [UPDATED] September 6, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Dallas Diocese, General Catholic, Holy suffering, Latin Mass, Liturgy, manhood, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, Virtue.
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[UPDATE: COMMENTS CLOSED.  You people know I have your e-mails and IPs, right?  It’s kind of obvious when you all use the same one. This campaign of character assassination will not be permitted to continue.]

This is one of those sad/happy, good news-bad news kinda things.  Good local priest Father Paul Weinberger (as to the good, you can find several instances of this by searching his name on this blog) has been reassigned from his role as pastor of St. William parish in Greenville, on the periphery of the Diocese, to St. Monica parish in north Dallas.  I just spoke with Father Weinberger, and he advises that he will be priest in residence at Saint Monica, and will serve publicly there offering Mass and Confession, but only after a period of personal time in which he takes care of some long-delayed matters related to the estates of his deceased parents.

I say this is good news/bad news because it is bittersweet anytime a priest is reassigned, especially one that had been so long at one parish as Father Weinberger had.  He had been at St. William about 18 years and had expressed hopes of serving there for the rest of his priestly ministry. In that time, many families had moved to the Greenville area to enjoy both a more rural manner of living and to take advantage of Father Weinberger’s very solid catechesis, reverent liturgy, and abundant Confession. Obviously many of those people are very sad to see Father Weinberger go.  Father Weinberger is being replaced by one of the Diocese’s younger priests, Father Edwin Leonard.

But now, Father Weinberger is moving on to St. Monica, a centrally located and well known parish, where many more souls may take advantage of his gifts.  I’m certain he will be well received.  Whether Father Weinberger will be offering Latin Mass at St. Monica or publicly performing other devotions such as the nightly Rosary processions and frequent confessions is not known at this time (uh, because I forgot to ask).

Our family attended St. William for several years before eventually, and not without some sadness, moving on to Mater Dei and the full time Traditional Latin Mass.  We have missed Father Weinberger over the years and look forward to being able to see him again, now that he is much closer to Irving. It was a nearly hour to drive out to Greenville, now he’ll only be about 15 minutes away.

Please pray for Father Weinberger and the parishioners of St. William. Losing a long time beloved priest can be very painful. I understand that at least some of the families will be traveling to Mater Dei on Sundays, so you Mater Dei readers be on the lookout for new faces (I know……..which ones?)!  I will provide updates on Father Weinberger and his service at St. Monica as they become available.

Excellent Priest on the Fruits of Feminism – UPDATED July 7, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, fightback, General Catholic, Grace, Interior Life, priests, Restoration, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Not sure if I am allowed to ID this priest or not, but I can say he’s one of my two favorite, most rock-solid FSSP priests a priest who gave a great sermon but not the one I was thinking of!  He sure sounds like an FSSP priest I know.  Oh well, humans gonna err.

He has an excellent sermon on the evils of feminism.  The key point is that the radical, man-hating, Christ-despising feminism we see today is the inevitable end-point of this erroneous and frankly diabolical movement.  There was never a “good feminism.”  It was always ordered towards subverting the role of men and women and essentially having the two sexes flip those roles.  You could say that feminism has always been much more a female supremacy movement than one interested in any kind of true equality – as if the God-given and traditional Christian roles of the sexes were somehow unequal.  They were only “unequal” in a totally materialistic and power-dynamic obsessed sense, the kind marxists would tend to grab onto.

There are those who argue that while “some” feminists take the movement too far, feminism at its roots is a good thing, and something it is perfectly acceptable to subscribe to.  I believe Father demonstrates the falsity of this claim.  At any rate, even if there are still some who consider themselves “moderate feminists,” only interested in some self-defined notion of equality and not at all like the radical fringe, the point is immaterial from a practical standpoint.  For 50 years or more feminism as a movement has constantly been dominated by its most radical fringe, and those who pretend to subscribe to only its more moderate aspects are giving valuable aid and comfort to this radical fringe.  Thus, feminism is something that no well-ordered and virtuous Catholic woman or man can subscribe to.

And why would you want to?  How does feminism help you or anyone you love get to Heaven?  The traditional Christ-inspired roles for men and women are completely focused on just that end, men and women helping each other, in constant practice of virtue, to attain Heaven, especially within the confines of marriage but also without.  All the evidence I have seen indicates feminism can do nothing but frustrate the good and holy purpose of rightly-ordered male-female relationships.

Please pray for Father that he may not be persecuted for preaching the truth of Jesus Christ and His Church in this most diabolical time, and that many will not just hear, but listen, to his words:

Feminism’s fruits are not just widows and orphans, but also hundreds of millions of murdered babies worldwide, and God knows how many broken marriages and devastated homes.

 

He Makes All Things New – Secular News Report on TLM in Providence, RI April 2, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, episcopate, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, priests, Restoration, thanksgiving, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Former Superior of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) Father John Berg is highlighted in a local TV report about the restoration of a parish in Providence, Rhode Island after it switched from the inefficacious “church of accompaniment” model to that of Holy Mother Church – e.g., the traditional practice of the Faith.  A parish that was headed for closure is now growing and expecting a bright future with large families and devout souls:

Some thoughts – they obviously visited during Mass on Laetare Sunday. What a blessing to have such a beautiful church which helps focus the mind on our eternal end and the great gifts of the Church and her Saints.  The church still needs some restoration – an altar rail and probably a proper baptistery among other things.  Nevertheless, they have some wonderful material to work with.  Would that we were so fortunate  here locally, but perhaps one day we will be.  Also, I appreciated the comment from one gentleman about the fundamental difference between a Novus Ordo parish offering a TLM or two – as beneficial and wonderful as that is – and a parish dedicated to the entire traditional practice of the Faith in all its forms and with all the manifold benefits that brings.  So true, so true.

Speaking of the future and the local Latin Mass parish Mater Dei, it was reported this past Sunday that Mater Dei is expected to have 2500 souls attending on Sunday within 7 or 8 years, if not sooner.  Wow.  That will be interesting.  I still think that indicates sufficient “demand” for another TLM parish, but I don’t see the bishop queueing up to ask my opinion on the matter anytime soon.

Our eternal Holy Mother Church will be restored, one way or another (either the Church will return to her true nature after this generation of charlatans and self-interested grifters passes, or Christ will come again).  I prefer the former, but may His will be done!

Good on Bishop Tobin for bringing a full TLM parish back to New England.  May there be many more.

Extraordinary Talk on Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus by Fr. Isaac Mary Relyea April 2, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, fightback, Four Last Things, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, manhood, priests, religious, sanctity, Society, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I really like Father Isaac Mary Relyea, and here he delivers an exceedingly entertaining and watchable 80 minute talk on perhaps the most neglected, misunderstood, and deliberately ignored doctrine in modern Church life, Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus (EENS), or there is no salvation outside the Church.  Father approaches the topic from its innumerable and unprecedentedly strong supports in the history of dogmatic theology, but also from a profoundly practical and pastoral -in the true sense of the word – standpoint.

Many faithful Catholics today have family members who are outside visible communion with Holy Mother Church.  The doctrine of EENS causes those of us with most or all of our family outside the Church grave concern.  But there are reasons to hope, and Father elucidates those.  However, this is not the false hope of the modernists and indifferentists, who pretend that it makes no difference to God whether one exists inside the sole ark of salvation He instituted for men’s salvation.  It is hope in the goodness and love of God, which is infinite, and in the power of prayer and pen ance, which exist and work outside of our narrow conceptions of time.

I pray you find this sermon as enjoyable and edifying as I did.  Please pray for Father Isaac Mary Relyea and all good, faithful priests, they are under the most extreme attack and need our prayers and support.

There were other talks from The Fatima Center conference held in Houston last month that I hope to post later, including some from Father Michael Rodriguez.  My esteem for The Fatima Center only continues to grow as I see the excellent work they are doing for the good of souls and the restoration of our Holy Mother the Church.

Glorious Liturgical Developments in Dallas – UPDATED March 1, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, episcopate, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, Liturgy, priests, religious, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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[UPDATE] A quick update, I had the location for the new Dominican Rite traditional Mass wrong in the original version of this post.  That has been corrected below.]

I know this blog has been on a long hiatus, but it’s not quite dead, yet.  I’ve changed jobs and am able to work from home at least somewhat now, but all this has happened in the past few weeks and I haven’t had time to get back to blogging.  However some wonderful news regarding drastically improved and/or authentic liturgy has developed of late that I had to share in spite of any difficulties on my end.  The news is this – the Dallas Diocese will be getting its second Traditional Latin Mass location within the next three weeks.  In addition, there

Father Cargo

will be another Novus Ordo Latin Mass offered in the Diocese at least through Lent.

Regarding the latter first, the excellent young priest Fr. Jason Cargo, pastor of St. Joseph parish in Richardson, will be offering Novus Ordo Masses in Latin starting on Thursday March 7 at 6pm.  These Masses will be held every Thursday of Lent – not sure about Holy Thursday – at the same time.  The Masses will be offered Ad Orientem.  This is a wonderful development and will hopefully lead to more such Masses in future.

Even closer to home for this writer, Fr. Thomas More Barba of the Dominican Priory of St. Albert the Great adjacent to the campus of the University of Dallas (where my daughter is matriculating as a freshman while living at home) will begin offering the Extraordinary Form of the Dominican Rite – that is the Traditional Latin Mass according to the Dominican Rite – on Tuesday March 19th (the feast of St. Joseph!) and on subsequent Tuesdays at 5pm (at the chapel of the University of Dallas/Church of the Incarnation, contrary to what I indicated in a previous edition of this post).  According to Father Barba:

This is the “extraordinary form of the Mass,” or the Mass as it was celebrated by the Dominican Order prior to the Novus Ordo, or “ordinary form of the Mass.”  While this is not the extraordinary form of the Roman Rite, the celebration of the Dominican Rite is a gift from the treasury of my Order that I am honored to offer to you all as a friar preacher……..

……..It is my hope that these additions to our liturgical life at UD – and every decision I make – may help all of us to strengthen our bonds of communion with Our Lord and with each other in joyful charity.

I have never assisted at a Dominican Rite Mass.  It would be wonderful if readers could help elucidate the differences between the Mass of St. Pius V, or what is broadly known as the Traditional Latin Mass, and the

Father Barba

traditional Dominican Rite.  Are both common and proper prayers different? Are the changes slight, or rather substantive, in your opinion?  Are there missals available for the traditional Dominican Rite?

These are both extremely welcome developments and, I pray, indicate a substantial change in the approach taken by the ordinary of the Diocese of Dallas with regard to legitimate use of the Church’s great liturgical tradition.  The previous bishop of Dallas maintained, contra Summorum Pontificum, that he alone had the right to assess the need for any Masses in Latin, and only in Latin.  Pastors could add new Masses in Spanish, Vietnamese, Korean, or any other language as they saw fit, but Latin Mass in any form was, quite unjustifiably, his sole purview. Well now that Kevin Farrell has gone onto bigger and “better” things, perhaps the attitude towards Latin Mass is changing, and a most welcome change it will be.  I believe Fr. Weinberger at St. William’s in Greenville is still offering his Novus Ordo Latin Mass Ad Orientem, the Ad Orientem being something he was forbidden to do under Bishop Farrell. Thus, there are some quite positive signs all around, and Bishop Burns should be thanked and, even more, prayed for still more (though I am not certain whether bishops have authority over Masses offered in religious houses within their jurisdiction – certainly pray for the prior of St. Albert’s and the superior of the order, as well).

I bring up this apparent change not to carp about the previous bishop, per se’, but simply to point out the apparent difference and to provide hope for those many thousands of souls who have been pining for a much broader appreciation and offering of more traditional, more reverent liturgy.  Or, at least, many souls feel Mass offered in Latin, or especially according to the Church’s ancient pre-conciliar tradition, is much more reverent and efficacious of their communing with God at the great Supper of the Lord than what is offered in the vast majority of parishes the vast majority of the time.  I pray this is only the beginning of a great liturgical renewal through return to Tradition in the Diocese of Dallas, and that I have many more occasions to make posts such as this in the near future.

A final note, there is no end date for the EF Dominican Rite Masses at the Church of the Incarnation on the campus of the University of Dallas, that I am aware of.  This is a change that will continue beyond Lent.

So get off early from work on Tuesdays and come experience something new but also very old!  Thank you to all the good priests who made these developments possible!

Some images of traditional Dominican Rite Masses below.  What glory!  Thank you, Lord!  We do not deserve this, but thank you so very much!