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Saint Alphonsus’ 16 Principal Means for Attaining Sanctity June 1, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, mortification, religious, Saints, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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The world may seem to be falling down around us, but our duty is to practice virtue and work towards the attainment of the greatest sanctity possible regardless.  From The True Spouse of Jesus Christ, Saint Alphonsus’ 16 means to the attainment of sanctity.

This list, as it goes along, becomes quite challenging, but it is held up as an example of how to attain perfection, to whatever degree we are capable in cooperation with Grace:

  1. Strong and ardent desire to become a saint.
  2. Great confidence in Jesus Christ and in His Holy Mother.
  3. To avoid every deliberate sin or defect, and after a fault not to lose courage, but to make an act of contrition for it, and then resume  your ordinary occupations.
  4. To cut off all attachment to creatures, to self-will, and self-esteem.
  5. To resist continually your own inclinations. [4 and 5 are very difficult, and will take many a lifetime even to begin, but we are talking about attainment of practical perfection, to the degree humans aided by Grace are capable of such.  The thing is to do  your best and, most importantly, always be advancing, never retreating]
  6. To observe with exactness the rules governing your state in life.
  7. To perform your ordinary duties with all possible perfection
  8. To communicate often – with the permission of your director/priest; to make long and frequent meditations,  and to perform all the mortifications which he will permit
  9. To prefer, on all occasions, those actions which are most agreeable to God, and most opposed to self-love.
  10. To receive all crosses and contradictions with joy and gladness from the hands of God.
  11. To love and serve those who persecute you. [10 and 11 are also very difficult. They are so contrary to our fallen natures. But again we are talking about working towards perfection]
  12. To spend every moment of your time for God.
  13. To offer to God all your actions in union with the merits of Jesus Christ.
  14. To make a special oblation of yourself to God, that He may dispose of you and of all you possess in whatever way He pleases.
  15. To protest continually before God that His pleasure and love are the only objects of your wishes.
  16. Lastly, and above all, to pray continually, and to recommend yourself, with unbounded confidence, to Jesus Christ and to His Virgin Mother and to entertain a special affection and tenderness towards Mary.

On the need to always be advancing in sanctity, and never retreating, a further excerpt:

“Not to advance,” says St. Augustine, “is to go back.” St. Gregory beautifully explains this maxim of spiritual life by comparing a Christian who seeks to remain stationary in the path of virtue to a man who is in a boat on a rapid river, and striving to keep the boat always in the same position………Since the fall of Adam man is naturally inclined to evil from birth……..Because, in the way of God, a Christian must either go forward and advance in virtue or backward and rush headlong into vice.

In seeking eternal salvation, we must, according to St. Paul, never rest, but must run continually in the way of perfection, that we may win the prize and secure an incorruptible crown.  So that you may obtain (I Cor ix:24). If we fail, the fault will be ours; for God wills that all be holy and perfect.  This is the will of God – your sanctification (I Thess iv:3). He even commands us to be perfect and holy.  Be you therefore perfect, also your Heavenly Father is perfect (Matt v:48). Be holy because I am holy. [Lest we think God demands more of us than is possible……..] He promises and gives, as the holy Council of Trent teaches, abundant strength, for the observance of all His commands, to those who ask it from Him.  “God does not command impossibilities; but by His precepts He admonishes you to do what you can, and to ask what you cannot do; and He assists you, that you may be able to do it.”

———-End Quote———–

Earlier in the week we had the four practices that principally sanctified Saint Aloysius Gonzaga.  St. Alphonsus breaks those down into more detailed steps with a bit different emphasis.  There are many mansions in the Father’s house. There are many paths to sanctity.  But all revolve around constant prayer, devotion to the Blessed Sacrament and Our Lady, self-denial, practice of virtue, and eschewing all sin.  Not difficult to understand, but extremely difficult to practice.

Especially in this fallen age.  But it has always been such, I suppose.

Novus Ordo Anointing of the Sick Not a Sacrament – Not “Equivalent” to Extreme Unction? May 31, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Basics, catachesis, different religion, disaster, error, Four Last Things, General Catholic, horror, priests, religious, scandals, secularism, sickness, Society, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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A very interesting little bit of catechesis below from The Fatima Center.  The traditional Dominican priest who answers these questions (since Fr. Gruner’s demise, RIP), Father Albert, claims that not only is the modern, post-conciliar sacrament “Anointing of the Sick” deficient compared to the Sacrament of Extreme Unction in its practical application, the way “anointing of the sick” is done in most parishes is so bastardized in its minimalist reductio ad absurdam that it no longer even constitutes a Sacrament:

“There is an essential difference between “anointing of the sick” and the traditional Extreme Unction.” “Often, the anointing of the sick that is given in the Novus Ordo is not a sacrament at all.”

I was always gravely disturbed by the monthly “anointing of the sick” ceremonies that occurred in some local NO parishes.  Literally everyone lined up to receive an entirely perfunctory blessing, irrespective of their general health.  I mean 25 year old marathon runners were getting blessed.  There was no examination of conscience, no contrition expressed, only the most minimal of anointings, and, I long ago concluded, little grace conferred.  I have long wondered if such a truncated service could indeed be considered a Sacrament.  According to Father Albert, most of the time, it is not.

So, Extreme Unction, properly received, removes temporal debt due to sin.  It is a Sacrament ordered almost entirely towards aiding those in serious threat of death or with serious health problems in attaining Heaven at their particular judgment.  It is not a “sacrament of healing” as “anointing of the sick” is generally called now in the Novus Ordo world.  It was never a Sacrament intended to be received over and over again on a monthly basis in a totally perfunctory way.  And what is even more sad, is that I have seen the mentality of this bowdlerized group blessing translate into the hospital and sick bed, where only the most dilatory of blessings are conveyed on those who truly are gravely ill instead of the thorough preparation for death and blessing for the passage of the soul from the body which has traditionally been given in the Church.

As with so much in the Novus Ordo, and as Father Albert notes, the accidental aspect of the Sacrament has assumed the primacy, whereas its primary role has been reduced to distinctly secondary place.  In this case, the accidental healing qualities of Extreme Unction have become the focus in the “sacrament of healing”  – and note once again the humanistic nature of the change, with most all the focus on bodily healing in this life rather than the preparation of the soul for its real life, that is the next life, which shall be eternal.

I had long felt there were grave deficiencies with the anointing of the sick as it is practiced in most all Novus Ordo parishes but had never managed to put the concerns so precisely and succinctly.  Thanks to The Fatima Center for these helpful  catechetical videos.

 

The Four Sacred Devotions that Drove Saint Aloysius Gonzaga to Great Sanctity May 30, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, Eucharist, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, manhood, mortification, religious, Saints, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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From the Life of Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, Patron of Christian Youth by Maurice Meschler, SJ, the four pious practices the Saint felt were most efficacious in achieving great sanctity and practice of devotion to our Blessed Lord.  None of  these particular devotions will be strange or unfamiliar to readers, but the passion and fervor with which they were practiced were spectacular.  Our Catholic Faith is not difficult to comprehend – many wholly uneducated people have  become hidden saints – but it is very difficult to put into practice.  That is why the Lord has blessed His Church with many canonized Saints, to provide us with direct examples of how to conduct lives pleasing to Him:

The practice of the various Catholic devotions is an important point, and an excellent means of promoting the spiritual life.  Aloysius had four special devotions.  The first of these was the devotion to the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar.  In his father’s house and in the midst of his life in the world, it had been a joy to him to serve Mass; and now in the novitiate he could do this to his heart’s content.  Very often during the day he visited the Blessed Sacrament in the church, or in an adjoining chapel.  In order to prepare well for Holy Communion, he divided the week into two parts, the first of which he devoted to thanksgiving for his last Communion, and the second to preparation for the next. [Back then, even such obvious Saints as Aloysius Gonzaga could only receive weekly, if they were fortunate.  Today we can the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar daily, but do we really adequately prepare ourselves, or render due thanksgiving, for this unspeakable Gift? Do we sometimes, or perhaps often, take it for granted, or allow the concerns of the world and the flesh to crowd our souls and cause us to receive the Sacrament in a blasé fashion? While we may not have the time or the gift of such immense sanctity to make such preparations or thanksgivings as Gonzaga did, perhaps we could do a bit more?]    On the eve of his Communion day he would speak with touching piety of the happiness in store for him the next morning.  Many of his companions, and even those who were already priests, who wished to prepare well for Holy Mass, sought to be with him on such days, in order to be moved to greater fervor by his piety and the ardent love which his words displayed.  On the morning of the day itself, his first thought was of the Savior he was about to receive, and he passed the whole hour appointed for meditation in pious reflections upon the Blessed Sacrament.  He sought out a quiet corner of the church to make his immediate preparation and thanksgiving, and his heart overflowed with the sweetest consolation. Many other worshippers who saw him, but did not know him, concluded merely from the sight of his fervor that he must have a special devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, and even that he must be a Saint.  He spent the whole morning after his Communion in silence and recollection, praying and reading passages from St. Augustine or St. Bernard. [If Saint Aloysius devoted days and hours to preparation and thanksgiving, perhaps we could arrive to Mass a 10 or 15 minutes early (or more) to properly prepare ourselves, and not move to depart the church the instant Mass ends?] Thus the precious seed, planted by Saint Charles Borremeo in the child’s heart at his First Communion, had grown into a beautiful tree that enriched his whole life and character with its blossoms and fruits.  [For it was from this Saint that Aloysius Gonzaga received his First Communion]….And the Church herself has raised an imperishable memorial to this beautiful trait of his piety, in the Collects of the Mass for his feast, in which she commemorates his excellent method of preparation and thanksgiving for Communion, and begs God to grant us the grace to ever appear at this heavenly banquet adorned with the wedding garment of Grace, whose beauty Aloysius enhanced as with pearls of inestimable value by his pious preparation and copious tears.

A second favorite devotion of the Saint was that to the Passion of Our Lord.  The life of suffering and mortification he led naturally urged him to seek in the mysteries of the Passion a model of strength and comfort.  Everyday at noon he recited an antiphon in honor of the Passion, and placed himself in spirit before the Cross of Our Savior……

…….His third devotion was his ardent love of Our Lady. Since his sojourn in Florence she had been the Queen of his heart and the guiding star of his life, and he never tired of thinking of her, honoring her, praising and loving her, especially now that he could appreciate the inestimable benefit he owed to her in his vocation.  In his letters to his mother he frequently recommends her to have a great devotion to the Blessed Virgin, holds up to her in her trials the example of the Mother of God and encourages her to be faithful in the service of the Queen of Heaven……

..Lastly, Aloysius had a special devotion to the holy Angels.  Virginal souls have a certain affinity to the Angels, and always feel attracted to them.  His veneration for these blessed spirits was so well-known to his companions that when Fr. Vincent Bruno was about to publish a book of meditations, he asked Aloysius to write the meditation on the Holy Angels, and the Saint joyfully complied.  Thus originated the little “Treatise upon the Angels, especially the Holy Guardian Angels.” After having cited the principal passages of Scripture in which the Angels are mentioned, he speaks in the first part of Angels in general, showing the necessity of devotion to them, first, from the example of the Church, secondly, from their nature and dignity, third, from their number, and lastly from their ninefold order. It is remarkable and very characteristic of Aloysius, that he unites devotion to the HOly Angels with his favorite virtue of humility in this first part of the meditation: “Consider how fitting it is, that on the feast of the invincible Arcangel the Gospel of the virtue of humility is read; for while proud Lucifer, on the one hand, was precipitated from his lofty throne in Heaven down into the depths of hell, because he presumed to arrogate divine honor to himself, the humble Archangel Michael and the whole host of the good Angels were highly honored and raised to the  highest rank, because they submitted to their Creator and full of zeal for his honor, opposed the proud serpent.”

……A colloquy with God after the meditation teaches us “to beg Him, Who bestowed such abundant graces upon the Angels, to grant unto us also through their intercession the grace to imitate their humility, clarity, and purity.”…..

…….A slip of paper has been preserved, upon which Aloysius had noted down for his own use a few “pious practices in honor of the Holy Angels”: “Imagine yourself standing in the midst of the nine choirs of Angels, as they pray to God and sing that hymn of praise: ‘Sanctus Deus, Sanctus Fortis, Sanctus Immortalis.’ Repeat this prayer nine times in union with them – Recommend yourself three times daily to the special care of your Guardian Angel.  Every morning and evening, and during the day, when you visit the church and pray at the altar, recite the prayer ‘Angele Dei.’ [Angel of God…..] Remember that you must follow the guidance of your Angel, like a blind man who does not know the way, and trusts entirely to the care of the person who leads him.”……….

……..One of the effects of his frequent and fervent prayers was an uninterrupted union with God.  It cost Aloysius more effort to put the thought of God away from his mind than it does others to turn their thoughts away from creatures to God.

———–End Quote———-

I was unfamiliar with Saint Aloysius before reading this biography, but what a great Saint he was.  And is.  A patron for Christian youth, indeed, his purity was unequaled.  He often did not even know what women he had been met numerous times before looked like, so skilled was he in practicing custody of the eyes.  His practice of prayer and penance was so immense his superiors in the Jesuit novitiate actually had to restrict his activities to some degree in these regards, so as not to so surpass his confreres as to disrupt the unity of the group nor cause discouragement in others.

I would strongly encourage parents to learn about Saint Aloysius Gonzaga and have their children do the same.  He is a great example and powerful protector in this time of gross immodesty, unchecked lusts, and a million lurking dangers for children.

Has the “Church of Darkness” Eclipsed the True Church? May 5, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Basics, catachesis, disaster, episcopate, error, foolishness, General Catholic, horror, religious, Revolution, scandals, secularism, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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Interesting commentary from Father Albert of the traditional Dominican community of the Holy Rosary in Belgium.  I do not think he quite answers the question posed to him definitively, which posited that the Church in Rome, that is to say, the curia and the institutional hierarchy, are becoming so estranged from the Catholic Faith as to become “the seat of antichrist” (boy, won’t prots have a field day with that), but he notes that while the Church has not quite reached the point that the antichrist is literally reigning in it, much of the institutional hierarchy is preparing the way for that terrible eventuality.

Most troubling, the Church has, since Vatican II, and to a greater and greater extent as the years pass, lost those four distinguishing marks that reveal her to be the True Church and Bride of Jesus Christ, those being: holiness, unity, catholicity, and apostolicity.  Such is Father Albert’s surmise, at any rate:

Do you agree with his assessment, and in what way?  Is the compromised, even fallen Church forewarned by Our Lady at La Sallete, Fatima, and Akita coming to pass, or is it already in full bloom?  Has the true Church been “eclipsed?”  These are very difficult questions.

You can catch Father’s brief Q&A sessions most days on The Fatima Center channel on Youtube.

Awesome to see the tonsure, btw.  Much appreciated.

Gentle Reminder: Switch from the Angelus to the Regina Caeli April 17, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, Liturgical Year, Our Lady, priests, religious, Restoration, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Victory, Virtue.
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I remembered this year, to start praying the Regina Caeli, as opposed to the Angelus, on Easter day.  Sometimes in the past, it’s taken me a day or three to remember.  I’m sure most of you have not had this problem, but if any have, here is your reminder.

To beef out the post a bit, a few pictures from Good Friday:

It was nice having a religious priest present during Holy Week

I pray you are enjoying this glorious Octave.  I think next year I will take off less time before Easter and more time after.  I’ve taken off most of Holy Week for years, but I feel ready for a change.  I’d like to enjoy the great feast more, and not just go back to work the day after Easter. I’ve always enjoyed that aspect of Christmas.  I wish I had the time to take off the entire week of Easter, but that’s not going to happen.  Oh for the days when working men had every great feast day off work, a true holy day holiday!

Party for New Catholic TV Show Tonight (04/03/17) at UD Campus April 3, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Grace, Interior Life, religious, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Tonight there will be a premiere party at the campus of the University of Dallas of a new TV show directed by prioress Sister Jane Dominic Laurel and featuring nuns of the recently stood up Irving offshoot of the Dominicans of Nashville.  The show is called “Praying as a Family.  I don’t know anything about the program itself, all I know is that late last week an email made the rounds inviting people to attend this premiere party at the UD campus.

Details below.  I do know Sister Jane Dominic has been giving some talks for women and girls at the UD campus and that those talks have been well received.  I suspect the show will be faithful but probably not explicitly traditional, which I expect most readers to understand.  The party is at 6:30.

Anyway, if you’re in the area and looking to have some fun tonight, here you go:

A Little Beautiful Catholic Culture: Saint Benedict Center Sings Byrd’s Ave Verum March 29, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, religious, Restoration, Tradition, Virtue.
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This is the Saint Benedict Center in New Hampshire, the one with the catholicism.org website.  Sensus Fidelium added the following description on  Youtube:

On October 22, 2016 the Brothers and Sisters from Saint Benedict Center, with some students and volunteers, went to The Arbors of Bedford, an Assisted Living Facility in New Hampshire, to sing and play for the residents. Here is our recording of William Byrd’s Ave Verum.

Great, and really well suited to this time of Lent!

Brief Bio of Wonderful St. Peregrine Laziosi, the “Cancer” Saint March 22, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Novenas, religious, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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You could say this is a Saint I have developed a particular devotion towards given what is going on with my son’s health.  We hope to find out more tomorrow just what this tumor he has is, and whether it has grown at all in the past 6 weeks.

A little bio on St. Peregrine Laziosi from Joan Carroll Cruz’s book Miraculous Images of Our Lord, p. 160, including the history of how Saint Peregrine came to be invoked by those stricken with cancer:

Born in Forli, Italy, Peregrine was taught the ways of prayer by his devout mother, but instead of being influenced by her, he preferred to devote his time to athletic endeavors and won the acceptance of his peers by indulging in his impetuous nature.  When St. Philip Benezi was preaching in the public square, Peregrine displayed his contempt by striking the Saint soundly in the face.  The Saint prayed for Peregrine’s return to virtue, and some years later, through the workings of grace, St. Philip Benizi welcomed Peregrine into the Servite Order at Siena.

The number of persons Peregrine converted to the Faith was outstanding, his work among penitents and sinners was extensive, his travels on errands of mercy were numerous and his miracles were countless.

When Peregrine was about 60 years of age he was stricken with a cancer on the leg that pained him, but did not interrupt his works of mercy nor ihs customary exercises of virtue.  Eventually, when gangrene consumed the flesh of his leg to the bone, the amputation of the leg was recommended as they only means of preserving his life.

On the eve of the operation, St. Peregrine visited the chapter room of the monastery to pray before a painting that depicts the Crucifixion.  We are told that he remained praying there throughout most of the night.  After Peregrine had been praying for many hours, the picture became animated.  Christ stretched forth His hand from the painting and touched the Saint’s diseased leg, which was later found to be completely healed with no trace of the former ailment.  The renowned surgeon who was scheduled to perform the amputation arrived the next morning for the operation and promptly acknowledged the miraculous nature of the cure.  Because of this miracle, countless victims of cancer devoutly pray to St. Peregrine for the cure of their disease.

———–End Quote———-

Here is a Novena to Saint Peregrine, which I will be praying:

Glorious wonder-worker, St. Peregrine, you answered the divine call with a ready spirit, and forsook all the comforts of a life of ease and all the empty honors of the world to dedicate yourself to God in the Order of His holy Mother.
You labored manfully for the salvation of souls. In union with Jesus crucified, you endured painful sufferings with such patience as to deserve to be healed miraculously of an incurable cancer in your leg by a touch of His divine hand.
Obtain for me the grace to answer every call of God and to fulfill His will in all the events of life. Enkindle in my heart a consuming zeal for the salvation of all men.
Deliver me from the infirmities that afflict my body (especially…..).
Obtain for me also a perfect resignation to the sufferings it may please God to send me, so that, imitating our crucified Savior and His sorrowful Mother, I may merit eternal glory in heaven.

St. Peregrine, pray for me and for all who invoke your aid.

There is also a website dedicated specifically to the Saint.

I do want to thank all of you for your continued prayer and support regarding my son’s condition.  We pray we get good news tomorrow, but no matter how it turns out, we thank God for all we receive.

 

St. Peter of Alcantara’s Nine Aids to Improve Devotional Life January 23, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, religious, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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From St. Peter of Alcantara’s Treatise on Prayer and Meditation, pp. 125-8.  Much of the spiritual direction given in his book was obviously intended for this with a vocation to the religious life, and while there are one or two recommendations below that may be difficult for those living in the world, with families to care for and jobs to perform, to implement, nonetheless it is very solid guidance overall, and well worth peter-of-alcantarasharing:

Many things contribute to devotion:

1] Firstly, it is very important to enter seriously and steadfastly upon these holy exercises, and with a very resolute heart, ready for whatever may be necessary, to secure this “Pearl of Great Price.”  Certain it is that there is nothing great which is not at the same time difficult.  So it is in the devotional life, at least for beginners.

2] Keep guard also over the heart, banishing every kind of vain and idle thought, all alien emotions and love, all passionate and tempestuous movements. Clearly enough, these all impede devotion.  Like the violin, if we would play on it, so also the heart, if we would pray and meditate, must be kept well tuned.

3] Keep watch also over the senses, especially the eyes, the ears and the tongue, for through the lips is the heart scattered, and by eyes and ears it is filled with varied imaginings and st-peter-alcantara-01with much that disturbs the peace and repose of the soul.  Hence has it been truly said that the contemplative soul should be as one deaf, blind, and dumb, for the less he dissipates his energies abroad, the more will he be recollected within himself. [A particular danger in this age is the electronic media, formerly TV/radio but now the internet in particular.  It is not just straight-up porn/immoral material that is bad for souls.  Letting our appetites be engorged in any area – even in entertainment/consumption of news/watching “harmless” programs can lead to loss of control of the appetite in other, more vital areas.  The first step to a spiritual calamity, many priests have told me, is too great an addiction to even “good” things one finds on the internet.  It is necessary to even limit these good things for the sake of performing some penance and maintaining control over our appetites in all areas]

4] For the same reason, incline toward a solitary life, for not merely does it remove from the senses occasions of distraction and from the heart occasions of sin, but it also invites a man to enter more into himself and to occupy himself alone with God, for to this one is indeed much drawn by circumstances of place, when no alien company finds admittance there.

5] Then, make a practice of reading spiritual and devout books.  They serve to feed the imagination and to keep the heart recollected, and they lead men of good will to occupy their minds with what has appealed to them, for what the heart is full of is always the first to suggest itself to the mind. [A strong corollary to #3 above]hostia2-alcantara

6] Keep the thought of God continually before you, and walk always in His presence.  Make us e of those short prayers which St. Augustine calls “ejaculations”; they guard the mansion of the heart and maintain, as we have said above, the warmth of devotion.  Thus is a man ready at any moment to give himself to prayer.  This is one of the most essential principles of a spiritual life and among the best resources for such people as have neither time nor opportunity for fixed prayer; and anyone who bears this counsel in mind and puts it into practice will make great progress in quite a short time.

7] Add to this, continuity and perseverance in these holy exercises, at the time and place fixed, especially night and morning, which, as all Holy Scripture teaches us, are the most suitable for prayer.painting1

8] Practice some austerity and bodily abstinence, a poor table, a hard bed, a hairshirt and a discipline and such like.  These things result from devotion and also contribute to it, preserving and strengthening the root from which they spring.  [I guess priests today recommend you don’t do physically punishing penances like wearing a cilice or taking the discipline without getting their close approval first, but back in St. Peter’s time, that permission seems to have been more freely given.]

9] Lastly, practice works of mercy. In our own sufferings, they give us confidence before God; they contribute much to the value of our prayers, which can no longer be called mere arid petitions, and they secure for them a reception full of mercy, seeing that they themselves proceed from a merciful heart.

———-End Quote———–

That’s all from St. Peter of Alcantara today.  Tomorrow, God willing, I’ll share his ten hindrances to devotion, or ten things Catholics should avoid in order to grow in the interior life.

Fr. James Martin, LBGTSJ, Continues to Cover Himself in Dung January 9, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, asshatery, cultural marxism, disaster, General Catholic, horror, religious, Revolution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sickness, Society, the struggle for the Church, unbelievable BS.
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A brief final post of the day: many readers will be aware that Fr. James Martin, SJ, is typical for men of the sadly fallen order he represents so fittingly, in being solidly on the progressive, worldly side, frequently (if not constantly) making what should be clear Doctrine into a dog’s breakfast of confusion and uncertainty.  He displayed that to excess, recently, in trying to claim that the Holy Family was filled with argument and disunity at times, contrary to the constant belief of the Church dating from Apostolic times, which is that the Holy Family featured three souls for whom sin was totally foreign*, and for whom self-interest was a non-existent commodity, thus making argument an impossibility, even if Mary and Joseph were sometimes confused by aspects of the Savior’s mission on earth:

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Perhaps I’m overstating things in claiming that Martin is asserting arguments within the Holy Family, but I think that implication can be plainly drawn.  His intent to “humanize” or “de-mythologize” the Holy Family may have good or sinister intent, but it is wholly consistent with the kind of insidious attacks on long-held belief that Jesuits have been infamous for these past several decades.

Our Lady was miraculously preserved from sin from her Immaculate Conception.  She was incapable of disagreeing with her Son, of not seeing “eye to eye.”  If there were times when she did not understand, fully, the Christ’s actions, she instantly conformed her will to them once their meaning became plain, such as when we read in the Gospel from the Feast of the Holy Family this past Sunday, when Jesus stayed behind in the Temple in obedience to his true Father instead of his earthly one – the completely right priority. Joseph and Mary were naturally worried about their son, but did not chastise Him or argue with Him in any way once He made his reply.  The Wedding at Cana is another instance where what may to secular eyes appear as “conflict” is actually the perfect alignment of wills.  Our Lady asked Jesus, perhaps prematurely, to address the exhaustion of the wine.  She asked this KNOWING that He would accede to her……it wasn’t really even a request, it was more a bald statement of fact, but Jesus, in His perfect generosity, knew what His mother willed……..and that is of course what happened.  Any other purported instances of disagreement are simply the natural result of what happens when limited human understanding confronts omnipotence and omniscience – there are bound to be misunderstandings on the human part, but in every case, Our Lady conformed her will to that of her Son as perfectly as a human being can.

This kind of tweet and post are just click-bait, to me.  Say something controversial in the hope of attracting hits.  It’s as banal as it is predictable – especially for a creature such as Martin.  There is no concern over causing scandal or offending the sensibilities of numerous devout souls, the only concern is for the clicks.

But that’s not all, Martin LBGTSJ also feels compelled to jump on the cultural bandwagon whenever something pleasing to progressives comes along, such as Meryl Streep’s breathless hyperventilating at the Golden Globes:

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Wow, so deep.  You can see how social media so elevates the cultural discourse.

Streep’s comments were offensive, because they equate voting for Trump with holding a foundational disrespect for certain others (whoever the Left wants from one moment to the next).  Sure, Trump has said some  unfortunate things, but they are off-hand comments made in passing, not points of deliberate policy.  Streep, Martin, and their co-religionists of the Left think very little about the “disrespect” shown to the unborn by the outgoing president they so idolize.  No, they are fixated on 15 year old off-color comments, not because they really care, but because it serves their political interests to do so.  That’s what all this screaming and crying and literal public lunacy on display over the past 2 months has been about, an attempt to de-legitimize the man elected president and prevent his administration from being able to roll back any of Obama’s disastrous policies, policies that have pushed this nation to the brink of destruction.

But politics is what it’s always about with the Left, whether it’s Streep or Martin or Winters or Chittister.  They are fervent adherents of an implacably hostile, alien religion, a demonic mishmash of bad science, diabolical philosophy, hatred for sound Doctrine, and unbounded pride – the religion of sexular Leftism.

I’m quite certain you already knew well enough to ignore anything Martin, SJLBGT and his ilk have to say, because you guys is S-M-R-T smart.

The only question I have is, can the Jesuits be reconstituted along something like the lines of their holy founder again through great suffering, reduction in numbers, and eventual replacement by solidly orthodox membership, or will extreme measures like suppression for a century or so be required to snuff out their particularly vile and pernicious set of errors?

*- St. Joseph is regarded – I don’t think it is a doctrine, but it is a strong tradition – to have been sinless from the moment of his betrothal to Mary.  For the time Jesus was Incarnate until his death, then, St. Joseph did not sin, even venially.