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Great New Father Rodriguez “Sermon” on Our Lady and God’s Supreme Dominion August 9, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Father Rodriguez, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, manhood, Our Lady, persecution, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I said in a previous post what a wonderful collaboration I could imagine between Father Rodriguez and The Fatima Center.  It seems such a collaboration may be flowering, The Fatima Center Youtube channel has uploaded another bit of catechesis from Father, and it’s a very good one:

A few choice quotes/summations: Quoting Pope St. Pius X: Apostasy from God is destroying society (in particular Western Civilization).  All artifice and effort is used to destroy the memory and the knowledge of God, rejecting, most of all, the idea of God’s supreme dominion over man and all creation, because, to the God-hating revolutionaries in and out of the Church, man must be his own God.  Read Guadium Et Spes and see if you don’t pick up a huge whiff of humanist triumphalism .  If St. Pius X’s claims were true 114 years ago, and they demonstrably were, how much more true are they today?  Goodness even questioning the prevailing sexular pagan orthodoxy in measured and scientific tones, with abundance of supporting data, will get you fired from a hugely influential corporation like Google.  What would they do to someone who preached the Truth of Jesus Christ to them -a firing squad?

But what was the Miracle of the Sun really about, but a testimony to God’s Supreme Dominion?  Thus the manifest errors of the world – so much less 100 years ago than they are today! – brought about the greatest, most well documented public miracle in the history of humankind (leaving aside the miracles of God Incarnate).  But how few souls have been moved to change their ways even by such a fantastic demonstration of God’s Holy Dominion over all of the universe.

“We are guilty.  God is truth, and our present world is filled with heresy.  God is holy, and our present world blasphemes and desecrates over and over again.  God is pure, and our present world is filthier than filth with impurity and putrid sins of the flesh, including the abomination of sodomy.”

Our Lady’s answer to the terrible sins of the world, and, yes, even the Church (today), is bipartite: prayer, and penance.  “Penance, penance, penance” she counseled.  She urges us to believe, adore, and hope in God, and always to love him.  Prayer and penance are the most concrete means at our disposal to both demonstrate this love for God and to offset the hatred for God evidenced in so many other souls.

“In order to be happy, we need God.  We need to adore God, honor God, respect God, and obey God.  All the evil darkness and sin in the world can be reduced to two basic ways in which God rejects God: modern man is rejecting God by the outright denial of God’s existence (atheism, at the root of communism, and also secular materialism), and by refusing to believe in God as God has revealed himself – simply put, by rejecting the Catholic religion.  This is one of the root causes of ALL the evil in the world……..It is a terrible sin of our times to think that each one is free to determine how to believe in God (the root error of protestantism).”

“Repeat to yourself often – God is the one who reveals Himself.  I accept and obey, I believe.  That’s what faith means -to believe in God, as He has revealed Himself. ”

“There is only one true religion.  All other religions are false.”  YAY FATHER GOD BLESS YOU for having the fortitude to preach this uncomfortable, often unpopular truth.

Our Lady came to Fatima to warn against the heresy of modernism. In the post-conciliar period, there has unfolded a particularly sinister and diabolical way has been rejected – not outright, and not by individual disobedience – but by disobedience at the highest levels of the Church. There have been ongoing and repeated attempts, ongoing even to this day, to try to change the Catholic religion, dilute it, and shift the focus from the supernatural to the natural, so that it still appears to be Catholic, but in actuality is not.  The purpose of the Catholic religion is not to end world poverty and fight against climate change.  The purpose is to lead souls to know and adore the one true God and so gain the happiness of Heaven. In the post-conciliar period the Catholic religion has been horribly corrupted by attempts to adapt it to the increasingly secular and materialistic culture.  We must conform to the Truth. Our culture must change, and be converted and conform to the Truth.  We cannot alter or dilute the Truth in order to justify how we live.

Well, I’d better leave some for you to watch!  Suffice it to say, this sermon has all the high quality and good for souls one would expect from Father Michael Rodriguez.  God bless him and those other priests, so few in number and often so made to suffer for their love of God and adherence to the Truth He reveals.  Please pray for Father.  His situation remains difficult but he continues to do as much good as he can under the circumstances -and that good is not inconsiderable.

Fr. Albert on Admonishing the Sinner August 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, religious, Restoration, sanctity, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Some interesting thoughts below.  Fr. Albert, a traditional Dominican in Belgium working with The Fatima Center declares admonishing the sinner is a moral duty and failing to do so can be sinful on our part, but then states that the situations wherein we have a positive duty to act are quite rare.  I haven’t a great deal of time to flesh this out today, but this is one of those matters that is very dear to many Catholic hearts and one that does cause quite a bit of division.  See what you make of it:

Do you feel Father Albert “wimps out” towards the end in stating that these admonishments may cause more harm than good and thus the situations where they are required are quite rare?  Or is this necessary prudence.

This matter comes up with some regularity at the local Fraternity parish, where we have had instances of people evidencing great hurt at being corrected by other lay people, and the priests have basically cautioned against such admonishments, asking matters like fraternal correction over immodest dress or how to raise and educate children be left to the priests (with some room for action if the matter is dire or pressing).  Some people very much agree with this stance, while others feel that doing so could lead to rapidly falling standards since priests won’t often have time to make such one-on-one corrections.

I covered this topic in a post a few months ago, so I don’t want to retread that ground all over again, but one thought that has occurred to me in the intervening months is that one’s approach to this matter depends very much on how one views their local traditional community as a whole, and how newcomers and those who err publicly fit into it.  Some hold the view that pretty much everyone who is bothering to come to a traditional Catholic parish is already extremely dedicated, generally trying hard to do their best, and should be given a lot of latitude to “come up to standard” with things like dress or homeschooling or using NFP or whatever hot-button topic.  These same people view the community as quite resilient and able to stand some problematic public displays in the interest of being accommodating and helping the community grow.

Then there are souls who are very concerned about standards, who well know the threats to the traditional practice of the Faith both inside and outside the Church, and who feel that those souls who are failing in certain, quite public, ways pose a threat to the integrity of the community.  They may even have direct experience of communities softening standards and inevitably sliding into mediocrity or worse, total collapse to the culture.  Many of these folks have been traumatized, in a sense, by experiences in Novus Ordo world or the culture generally, and place a high premium on protecting the integrity of the community/parish.  These people are also naturally zealous for the Faith and see its defense as a primary duty, recognizing rightly that a reverent, faithful Catholic parish is an incredibly precious thing, maybe even a vulnerable thing, and very much worthy of protection.

The thing is, neither of these outlooks is wrong.  Thus the tension that exists in many traditional parishes over how to handle matters like fraternal correction.  My natural disposition is much more towards the latter, and I will admit to being a bit suspect of the motives of those who have been in traditional communities a long time and  yet seem to take a certain joy in being non-conformist in various regards, without going into specifics.  I am also one who tries to take correction in the best light, instead of getting instantly offended and hurt and storming out of the place – not that I have not at times disagreed with someone’s well-meaning recommendations.

But, I also don’t want to see rigid communal standards emerge that exclude all but the most zealous, the most rigorous.  Those types of situations have a long history and almost universally end in extremes of opinion and action and communities dividing into hostile camps that eventually disintegrate.  There have been several attempts at utopian Catholic enclaves in the past 200 years and they have all ended badly.

I think prudence is the key.  If you see a lady in a short skirt and stilletos, but wearing a veil, and you’ve never seen her before, maybe cut her a break.  Don’t say anything.  But pray for that person.  If they keep coming and you get to know them a bit, perhaps that relationship will be a grounds to make a very charitable comment some weeks or months down the road if the person does not self-correct.  You and I may think homeschooling is practically the only way to raise a child in this moral sewer but you don’t have to unload that opinion on every soul you encounter.  Prying questions into one’s background and purity tests are not a good way to make an acquaintance.  The examples could go on endlessly, but I assume you get the point.

I would close by saying, if you fall more to one side or the other – the welcoming souls willing to look the other way at times, or the militant defenders of the sanctity of the community – also try to have some charity for those who feel differently from yourself.  If someone thinks it’s better to be more accommodating and less rigorous, that doesn’t make them a bad Catholic.  And those with strong personalities who feel standards should be enforced at all times and who do not shy away from correcting others, they are not necessarily the stereotypical bad rad-trad.

Yes this is another “can’t we all get along” post.  But maybe that’s not such a bad thing, for a group that is already surrounded on all sides and hopelessly outnumbered.  I’ve been reading about some of the failed Crusades to stop the spread of islam of late, and it is heart-breaking the degree to which Catholic division and in-fighting aided the spread of the demonic religion of Mohammad.  Different groups of Catholics refused to aid one another in the Fall of Acre in 1289.

Related.  End trad-Cath circular firing squads!

Briefest Reminder Posts – Assumption and Kolbe Novenas August 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Novenas, Our Lady, Saints, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, Virtue.
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The Assumption Novena properly started yesterday, but you can start today and finish on the feast.  The Novena for Maximilian Kolbe started Saturday but better late than never.

Brief Assumption Novena below:

Mary, Queen Assumed into Heaven, I rejoice that after years of heroic martyrdom on earth, Thou hast at last been taken to the throne
prepared for Thee in heaven by the Holy Trinity.

Lift my heart with Thee in the glory of Thy Assumption above the dreadful touch of sin and impurity. Teach me how small earth becomes when viewed from heaven. Make me realize that death is the triumphant gate
through which I shall pass to Thy Son, and that someday my body shall rejoin my soul in the unending bliss of heaven.

From this earth, over which I tread as a pilgrim, I look to Thee for help. I ask for this favor:

(State your intention here…)

When my hour of death has come, lead me safely to the presence of Jesus to enjoy the vision of my God for all eternity together with Thee.

Novena to St. Maximilian Kolbe:

O St. Maximilian Kolbe,

faithful follower of St. Francis,

inflamed by the love of God

you dedicated your life to the practice of virtue

and to works of the apostolate.

Look down with favor upon us

who devoutly confide in your intercession, especially for:

(here mention your special requests)

 

Having consecrated yourself to the Immaculate Virgin Mary,

you inspired countless souls to a holy life

and various forms of the apostolate

in order to do good to others

and to spread the kingdom of God.

Obtain for us the grace by our lives and labors

to draw many souls to Christ.

 

In your close conformity to our Divine Savior

you reached such an intense degree of love

that you offered your life to save a fellow prisoner.

Implore God that we,

inflamed by such ardent charity,

may through our living faith and our apostolic works

witness Christ to others,

and thus merit to join you in the blessed vision of God.

Amen.

Praying as a family has such enormous spiritual efficacy!  Perhaps you could have as an intention for your Novena the conversion of this nation and our fallen world – or maybe better yet the conversion of the leadership of the Church and the restoration of the Church’s human element.

Whatever your intention, Novenas as a beautiful aspect of Catholic Tradition!

Catholic Tradition in Prayer: Saint Patrick’s Breastplate August 3, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Interior Life, Saints, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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According to tradition, St. Patrick wrote this hymn in AD 433 for divine protection before successfully converting the Irish king Leoghaire and his subjects from paganism to Christianity.  The breastplate of course references Ephesians vi:12-18, wherein St. Paul describes the various armaments we must take on (those of prayer and virtue) in order to do battle with the principalities and powers of this world.  So the name is quite apropos for the combat the great Saint of Ireland engaged in in converting a violent pagan country to the sweet yoke of Jesus Christ.

Some dispute whether the prayer really is that ancient, but at any rate it is beautiful, and since I had never come across it before reading The Gentle Traditionalist, I figured you may not be familiar with it, either.  Or maybe it’s widely known, I really don’t know.  At any rate, here it is:

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness
of the Creator of creation.

I arise today
Through the strength of Christ’s birth with His baptism,
Through the strength of His crucifixion with His burial,
Through the strength of His resurrection with His ascension,
Through the strength of His descent for the judgment of doom.

I arise today
Through the strength of the love of cherubim,
In the obedience of angels,
In the service of archangels,
In the hope of resurrection to meet with reward,
In the prayers of patriarchs,
In the predictions of prophets,
In the preaching of apostles,
In the faith of confessors,
In the innocence of holy virgins,
In the deeds of righteous men.

I arise today, through
The strength of heaven,
The light of the sun,
The radiance of the moon,
The splendor of fire,
The speed of lightning,
The swiftness of wind,
The depth of the sea,
The stability of the earth,
The firmness of rock.

I arise today, through
God’s strength to pilot me,
God’s might to uphold me,
God’s wisdom to guide me,
God’s eye to look before me,
God’s ear to hear me,
God’s word to speak for me,
God’s hand to guard me,
God’s shield to protect me,
God’s host to save me
From snares of devils,
From temptation of vices,
From everyone who shall wish me ill,
afar and near.

I summon today
All these powers between me and those evils,
Against every cruel and merciless power
that may oppose my body and soul,
Against incantations of false prophets,
Against black laws of pagandom,
Against false laws of heretics,
Against craft of idolatry,
Against spells of witches and smiths and wizards,
Against every knowledge that corrupts man’s body and soul;
Christ to shield me today
Against poison, against burning,
Against drowning, against wounding,
So that there may come to me an abundance of reward.

Christ with me,
Christ before me,
Christ behind me,
Christ in me,
Christ beneath me,
Christ above me,
Christ on my right,
Christ on my left,
Christ when I lie down,
Christ when I sit down,
Christ when I arise,
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me,
Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me,
Christ in every eye that sees me,
Christ in every ear that hears me.

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness
of the Creator of creation.

———-End Quote————

It’s rather pretty and, I would say, quite lyrically Irish, is it not? I like it quite a bit. I hope to add this regularly to my prayer rotation.  God willing.

Perhaps this prayer might be invoked with the great evangelist Saint Patrick that the Church might be gifted with men of similar faith, devotion, and willingness to speak the truth in our own age.  The Church desperately needs some new Saints to reinvigorate the remaining faithful and begin converting the fallen away masses.

PS there are shorter versions of this prayer.  They basically are limited to the last half of the above.

Father Rodriguez on Mary’s Immaculate Heart July 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Father Rodriguez, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, mortification, Our Lady, priests, sanctity, thanksgiving, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Good Father Rodriguez with a brief rumination on Fatima and devotion to Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart.  From that Immaculate Heart we can especially learn virtues vital to salvation, especially purity, which in this day is so rarely maintained and so easily (and almost always irrevocably) lost.

Father shares how to practice devotion to the Immaculate heart, according to St. John Eudes: “keep in our heart the feelings which are in the heart of Mary the Mother of Jesus.”  The principle feelings in her heart are four: horror and abomination for sin, hatred and scorn for this corrupt world and everything pertaining to it, the lowest possible esteem for self, and profound esteem, respect, and love for all the things of God and His Church.  What excellent advice and direction for all seeking to grow in the interior life and the practice of virtue – and, I might add, how contrary to the “direction” we hear from Rome and most of the powerful episcopal leaders of the Church, including the exalted Cardinal Farrell, who I can assure you hasn’t spent 3 seconds in his life reading Eudes or any similar Saint of the interior life.

I won’t say anymore so I don’t steal all of Father’s thunder:

It would seem very natural and poetic to me should Fr. Rodriguez in some ways fulfill the legacy of Fr. Nicolas Gruner (RIP).  At any rate I pray his collaboration with the Fatima Center grows and grows.

End Catholic circular firing squads!

Kinda Neat, Kinda Flightline Friday July 26, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in catachesis, Flightline Friday, fun, history, huh?, Latin Mass, sanctity, Society.
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So I stumbled upon this the other day:

This is the patch of the 67th Cyberspace Wing, Lackland AFB, TX.  Formerly the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, which RF-4Cs used to wake me up Every. Saturday. Morning. at 7am when I lived in Austin. Flew right over my ghetto apartment.

At any rate, Lux Ex Tenebris is, of course, a phrase that emanates from the Catholic faith, most particularly, Tenebrae during Holy Week.  Lux Ex Tenebris means “Light out of Darkness,” which is the very essence of our Blessed Lord’s Passion, Death, and Resurrection.

So, on the one hand, I want to say, that’s neat.  Maybe some devout Catholic helped devise this motto?

Of course, this is not the old 67th TRW, unarmed and scared shitless unafraid, flying solo missions over hostile territory to gather photographic intelligence. No, this is the 67th Cyberspace Wing, whose mission is to “train and ready airmen to execute computer network exploitation and attack. It also executes full-spectrum Air Force network operations, training, tactics, and management.”

So maybe it does things like trying to hack into sensitive computer networks of potentially hostile great powers like Russia or China? Maybe they hack into North Korea’s missile program?

Or maybe does it ever work with the NSA in prying very deeply – to a degree that would be unbelievable to the Founders of this nation – into the personal affairs of private citizens?

Hard to tell in this day and age. And the wing is probably fortunate most people today are wholly ignorant of both Latin and the connection this phrase has to the Catholic Faith.  Otherwise, they would probably be forced to change it.

The motto dates back to the Korean War, and the unit’s activation at that time.  Maybe an early CO or DCO was a devout Catholic, and tried to sacralize the wing from its start.  Or perhaps they simply had some knowledge of Latin, though this phrase has, in the Western parlance, always had an overwhelmingly liturgical association.  Then again, the United States of 1951 was a much more Christian, much better educated nation.  If airmen from then could be magically transported to today, they would find the place unrecognizable, and be heartbroken to know that, whatever their efforts against external enemies, this nation has very nearly fallen to internal ones.

BDA from 67th TRW RF-4C, Operation Desert Storm

Saint Alphonsus Liguori on How to Perform Our Actions Well      July 19, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Holy suffering, mortification, Saints, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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In performing our actions well, the Saint means in the manner most pleasing to God.  This excerpt is from The True Spouse of Jesus Christ, a book originally intended for religious, but this section in particular has great relevance for all souls, not only those specifically consecrated to God in religious life (pp. 187-9).

Many times, we may get bogged down with the seemingly dull routine of life. We might find our job less than satisfying. We may be tempted to find as many distractions to get us through the day as possible (like, say, blogging).  We might find raising and educating kids very tiresome after 5 or 10 or even 2 years.  We might find it a lot more appealing to spend the afternoon on Facebook rather than do the laundry and check the kid’s math homework.

Even though our daily actions may not seem glamorous, even though they may eventually come to seem to be a tiresome routine, these constitute (for laity) the duties of our vocation in life and the means God has given us to grow in Grace and virtue.  We should not only perform these duties with great diligence, but we should even thank God for these means  He gives us to draw nearer to Him in this life.

Begin excerpt:

The following are the means to perform our actions well:

The first means is to preserve during the discharge of our duties a lively sense of the presence of God, that thus every act may be worthy of His divine eyes.

The second means is, to perform every work as if it were the only duty you had to fulfill. When at prayer, let your sole care be to pray well; when you say the Divine Office [which is not enjoined as precept on laity, but which is an extremely beneficial devotion], direct all your attention to the devout recitation of it; when engaged in any employment, your soul concern should be to discharge it well.  Think of nothing but the duty in which you are occupied. To examine, during the time of prayer, how you will direct a certain work, or to reflect on the mans of performing some other duty, is a temptation of the enemy.  “When,” says Saint John of Avila, “any unseasonable thought enters your mind, say: God does not will that I think at this moment on such a subject; and therefore it is not useful for me to reflect upon it: when He commands  me, I shall attend to it.”

The third means is, to perform every action as if it were the last of your life.  St. Anthony frequently recommended this means to his disciples. “In every work,” says St. Bernard, “let each one say to himself: If I were about to die, would I do this?”  Would I it in in this manner? Were this the last Mass that I should hear, with what devotion would I be present at it?………Were this my last Communion or my last meditation, with what fervor would I perform it?  When, says St. Basil, you discharge the duties of the morning, imagine that you shall not live till evening; when night approaches, think that you shall not see morning……….

Four, to think each day only on the labors of the day, is another means which greatly assists weak souls to discharge their duties with fervor.  The apprehension of the pains to be endured, in living till death with so much exactness, and in continually resisting self-love, is one of the causes which make many lose courage in the way of God.  The best means of conquering this temptation is to imagine each morning that you have but one day to live.  Whoever represents to himself that only one day of life remains, will certainly perform all the actions of that day with great perfection.  This means is very profitable for weak souls, but strong and perfect Christians do not require to conceal from themselves the labors necessary for the attainment of sanctity; they rejoice in suffering, and pant for opportunities of pleasing God.

Fifth, and finally, to those beginning to walk in the way of perfection it will be very useful to consider that what is in itself difficult and painful will by habit soon become easy and agreeableI will, says the Holy Ghost, lead thee by the paths of equity; which, when thou shalt have entered, shall not be straightened; and when thou runnest, thou shalt not meet a stumbling block (Prov iv:11-12).  I will, says the Lord, first conduct  you into the narrow paths of virtue; but you shall soon walk through a broad and pleasing way, and there you shall run without difficulties or obstacles. “At first,” says St. Bernard, writing to Pope Eugenius, “some duty will seem intolerable; if you accustom yourself to it, in process of time it will not appear so difficult; afterwards you shall not feel it; and in the end you will delight in it.” Behold with your eyes, says Ecclesiasticus, how I have labored a little, and have found much rest to myself (Eccl li:35).

———-End Quote———–

Do you find it difficult to present to yourself each day or night as your last? This is something I – I’m not sure struggle with is the right phrase – I have not developed the habit of or accustomed myself to.   It seems something very much worth trying, for both embracing some of my more prosaic duties and overcoming some attachments I have so far been unable to separate myself from.  If you have experience with these methods, please share, or if you try them, let me know how they work out.

Good News – FSSP Sets Record for Most Ordinations in a Year July 11, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, manhood, priests, Restoration, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Victory.
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For a long time, one of my chief daily prayers has been for the growth of traditional priestly orders.  I do not discriminate in this regard, and I am ambitious – I implore the Lord that the FSSP, SSPX, ICK, etc., individually and collectively, will grow by an order of magnitude in the next 20-25 years, and then another order of magnitude after that. I realize that would mean orders with tens of thousands of priests in less than a lifetime, but there have been orders that large in the past, which grew even faster at times.  I think the Cistercians went from none to over 1000 priests in less than 20 years.

If all these orders which exist today, which collectively have maybe 1200 priests, were to grow by an order of magnitude, there would be 12,000 traditional priests.  One can start to imagine a restoration of the entire Church with such numbers.

The 19 ordinations the FSSP has had so far this year won’t increase the order exponentially in 20 years, but it’s a very happy occasion and a solid basis for future growth.  And note, this is not a record for any traditional order – the SSPX has ordained more, but I’m not certain what its record is – it applies only to the FSSP.

There are photos and videos of the first “canonically regular” traditional priestly ordination in England in many years here and here.

I pray all the traditional priestly orders experience ever more rapid growth, but a rapidity tempered by no lessening of standards, but, on the contrary, always increasing piety, devotion, orthodoxy, love for Holy Mother Church.

Congratulations to all the ordinands, and to all the young seminarians, may God watch over you and keep you on your path to this vital and exalted office!  Please pray for KB, son of frequent readers and good friends of this blog.  He is a seminarian at Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary in Denton, Nebraska.

Also pray for Fr. Caleb Kick, who has spent some time with our family and was ordained on May 26.

May God have mercy on His afflicted Church and send us more seminarians and ordained priests!

A Troika of Awesome Sermons on Fatherhood June 22, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, episcopate, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, manhood, mortification, priests, sanctity, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I’m not going to try to give a synopsis of each of the three sermons below, I’m only going to say they are from a fantastic and much missed (by me, and others) priest, and on a topic of absolutely vital importance: spiritual and natural fatherhood.  I would agree with the priest that the root crisis in the Church and world today is a total collapse of all forms of fatherhood – the pious and virtuous father in the home, the holy priest who sacrifices himself for his flock in the knowledge that he will be judged severely for every soul that falls away or into sin, and fatherhood stemming from exalted episcopal offices in the Church, by which the souls of thousands, hundreds of thousands, and even millions are affected.

As anyone with eyes to see knows, fatherhood as an institution in every sense in recent decades has been in practically terminal decline.  The manifest problems stemming from failures by fathers in the home are too well known to review, but the enervation of spiritual fatherhood in the Church is perhaps less well known, or at least less recognized, and is even more poisonous to souls and the good of Christendom (what’s left of it) than the divorce rate, fornication, abortion, abandoned children, leviathan state, and other evidences of bad fathers in the home.

These three videos should be watched in order as each builds on the preceding one.  They give an awesome catechesis on all aspects of fatherhood – and the spiritual aspects of familial fatherhood should never be underestimated, as the father is the head of the domestic church! – as well as a powerful exhortation to amend our lives, as few if any fathers in this age, be they spiritual or familial, are performing their sacred and vital office with as much dedication and virtue as they should be.

I don’t know if synopses encourage people to watch videos I post more or not, and while there is a fairly significant time investment in watching or listening to these three, they are absolutely worth the time!  Listen while you do some household chores.  Listen while you drive. These are a must for men but also extremely valuable for women.  I pray you will take the time to listen to all of them, as I have.  There is catechetical wisdom contained in these sermons that is virtually impossible to find elsewhere and of inestimable value.

And yes Father gives me a shiny nickel for each view he gets, so I was really motivated to give a heavy sales pitch*.

Oh, Father does touch on one thing in the first video I thought I’d explore a bit in this post.  He leads off discussing the subject of mission, or being sent, and how only those commissioned by the Church in apostolates really have the right – and solemn duty – to perform various duties related to souls.  Fathers of families get their mission to raise children up in the Faith to be holy souls by the Sacrament of Matrimony.  Of course priests get their mission from the Sacrament of Holy Orders and their incardination in various dioceses or religious orders.

Protestants, however, do not have valid holy orders, nor do they possess valid sacraments.  Related to the post from Tuesday discussing Dave Eubank and his “mission” serving souls in extremely dangerous situations in Iraq, this is a point I wanted to address but did not get to.  But in reality, for all the good Eubank is doing, and it seems to be substantial, he has no proper mission in an ecclesiastical sense.  No protestant does.  Not even High Anglicans/Anglo-Catholics in pseudo-orders have such valid missions. That is something only the Church can give.

But mission is also something that is presently completely misunderstood, and even misrepresented to the point of abuse, in the Church today.  So many priests are horribly abusing their mission in preaching error and kow-towing to (almost always) Leftist politico-religious shibboleths.  Familial fathers have their own grave problems.  Anyway I thought this an interesting point and the concept of mission, as discussed by father, plays and absolutely vital role in all forms of fatherhood.

*-I am, of course, joking.

Amazing Protestant Family Giving Witness Amidst Incredible Danger in Iraq June 20, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, Ecumenism, family, General Catholic, sanctity, Society, Virtue.
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There is a man named Dave Eubank, former Green Beret, devout protestant, husband, father, and – it must be said – extremely dedicated evangelist, who has developed a mission (in a quasi-military sense) over the past several years of serving others in need amidst some of the most violent conflicts in the world. After starting in the jungles of Burma, where a low-level civil war has been ongoing for decades, he transferred his efforts – still called the Free Burma Rangers – to Iraq.

I saw an article about this man, and his family, including three minor children, providing supplies and medical care to souls suffering during the endless fighting in Iraq (fighting that was, tragically, largely caused by the failed policy efforts of these United States).  There is certainly much to be said about the prudence of exposing children to such extremely dangerous situations.  Yes I am sure they are careful, but they are in an active warzone and irreplaceable loss mixed with unspeakable tragedy is just a wrong footstep away.

And these folks are not somewhere miles behind the lines.  All of them are routinely exposed to great danger, especially the husband and father, Mr. Eubank:

Note, the video title has it wrong, none of the men in the video are currently serving US armed forces.  They are all members of Eubank’s Free Burma Rangers organization.  They apparently get into the fighting as part of their efforts, at least as far as giving covering fire for rescue efforts.  Also, there were two children Eubanks attempted to rescue.  He recovered the 5-6 year old girl, but there was also a toddler boy being fired at by ISIS in Mosul he was unable to recover.

That is incredible dedication.  I don’t know about the prudence of a father a family depends on doing that as a mission of charity, but it certainly speaks to this man’s enormous courage and conviction.

And this wasn’t a one time deal.  In the video below, Mr. Eubank gets shot through the arm, and his (presumably) Kurdish escort gets hit far worse:

The video below gives a better idea for what the wife and kids are exposed to:

It’s funny to see the reporter just inundated with body armor – like she’s in EOD or something! – and Eubank just walks around with a shirt and pants.  But I digress…….

Now, this man is certainly brave, has enormous conviction, and appears to be doing quite a bit of good.  But is it right for him to expose his children to such extremes of danger by choice?  There are certainly many ways of giving witness and serving others that don’t entail such grave risk of injury or loss of life.  And one could easily say that the children – even if they seem on board with dad’s very adventurous work – don’t really have a choice in the matter.  Kids might find it very hard to express their real feelings about being drug into this very violent and messy war.

Still, I find much to admire in this man and his family.  Now he’s a former Green Beret and probably well-versed in the situations in which he places himself and his family, but there it takes enormous guts and faith to do what he’s doing.  He states he has faith that God will protect him and his family in their work, and if it is their time it is their time.  One may argue with the morality and prudence of doing that, but I think he’s honest in being motivated by faith.  I do wonder if such extremes of effort, such great demonstrations of charity, make any impact on the hardened muslim mind?  Eubank did make converts in Burma, several of the medics serving with him in Iraq are Burmese.

Unfortunately he is protestant and thus holds a number of errors.  But would I have the faith and courage – even without wife and kids – to do what he’s done and plans to continue doing?  Probably not.  But does he even have a valid call from God to do this? Being protestant, that’s especially problematic (as St. Ignatius makes clear – more on that later, I pray).

That he is doing good is I think undeniable.  I am really amazed by this man’s willingness to help others.  See this rescue of a girl trapped under rubble for three days in ISIS-held territory:

So what do you think?  Is this zeal gone astray, or is this putting John xv:13 into concrete action in about the most literal way possible?  If he were Catholic would you think any differently of his work?