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Our Lady of Good Success Warned (and reassured) Us About This Sin-nod October 21, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, episcopate, fightback, Francis, General Catholic, history, Our Lady, Restoration, Revolution, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition.
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A nice and brief cartoon via reader TT, which reminds us that Our Blessed Mother has prophesied and warned of these days, but also given us reassurance as to the ultimate outcome of this war for the soul of Holy Mother Church:

Good Fruit of Francis’ Revolution – TLM Attendance Skyrocketing in US October 21, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, fightback, FSSP, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Restoration, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Victory, Virtue.
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+JMJ

Finally some hard numbers to put with the numerous anecdotes about rapidly increasing TLM attendance over the past few years.  I know from surveys and speaking with many of the recent “converts” to the Traditional Latin Mass, many of these folks are seeking out sanity and good Catholic liturgy and doctrine directly as a result of the errors being taught in their former parishes, and the horrific example of Francis which is often cited in those former parishes as reasons for rejecting and contradicting the perennial belief and practice of the Church.  Thus, in spite of himself, Francis and his cohort of aging hippies and Peronists are accomplishing much good in helping strengthen the Catholic counter-revolution.

The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter has put out some attendance numbers at a few representative parishes and they all show tremendous growth, whether very new or long and established.  I do not have attendance numbers for the other Ecclesia Dei communities or diocesan TLMs, nor the SSPX, though on the latter I have had discussions with a half dozen or more people who frequent SSPX chapels who say they have seen solid growth in the past year or two.

Halfway through the FSSP’s annual October census, Fraternity parishes and chapels around the country report major increases in Sunday Mass attendance compared with last year.

Newer apostolates have seen dramatic growth, some doubling their numbers over the last year, such as Los Angeles, which went from 250 per Sunday to 500. The apostolate did not even have its own church until 2018, so finally settling down in a small church in San Fernando provided needed stability, contributing to the significant increase it saw this past year.

“The main obstacle right now is a lack of space,” said Fr. Federico Masutti, assistant pastor of St. Vitus, talking to the Missive over the summer. His words echo the sentiment of so many other FSSP apostolates that find themselves outgrowing their buildings, but it’s really a great problem to have.

“When we were at 200 people,” said pastor Fr. James Fryar, “we decided to add the fourth Mass, and just adding that one Mass, from one week to the next, another 200 people came.”

“The growth was amazing,” confirmed Fr. Masutti.

In Naples, Florida, the FSSP has been operating for less than two years, and is at nearly 400 people per Sunday, up over 20 percent from last year.

“A plethora of young families are coming, attracted by the sacred beauty and reverence of the Mass, the traditional catechesis and true parish family life,” said pastor Fr. Jonathan Romanoski…………

“It’s more than just the Latin Mass—they’re coming for the community life and all of the groups we have—for adults, for kids, for catechesis,” he said. “They come because we are two priests, we are a small community where everybody can get to know each other and the families can truly bond.”

Two new apostolates established last year—in the dioceses of Philadelphia and Providence, Rhode Island—have started off strong and now have 400 and 300 parishioners, respectively. Both locations have inherited magnificent churches that should accommodate their communities for a long time………..

……….Even apostolates that have been established for a long time (by FSSP standards) have seen significant increases, but most report constraints of space that inhibit their growth and they look forward to building or buying new churches.

St. Anne Parish, our apostolate in San Diego, for example, was established in 2008, and despite having a small church that can seat approximately 200 adults, had reached more than 800 parishioners by 2018 with three priests offering five Sunday Masses. Now, they are averaging over 1,000.

“At some of our Masses we will have as many as maybe 350 people and so not everyone fits and so people are actually sitting outside the doors looking in through open doors,” said pastor Fr. John Lyons.

Other long-established FSSP parishes that have seen strong growth include our first North American apostolate, Mater Dei in Dallas, established in 1991, which has seen its Sunday congregation grow 24 percent from 1250 to 1550 in the last year. [It’s way north of 1600 now and touching on 1800 some Sundays.  It was about 200 in 2009.]

St. Joan of Arc Parish, our apostolate in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, has gone from 650 to 840 in the past two years, an increase of about 29 percent. Likewise, St. Francis de Sales in Atlanta, established in 1995, has grown 30 percent over the last year. In October of 2018, it averaged 460 people each Sunday; so far this month, it has over 600. +

Other established parishes like St. Rose Philippine in Kansas City have also grown a great deal.

Overall, it does seem the traditional Latin Mass continues to grow and thrive in virtually all locations where it has found a home.  If you have news of your local TLM parish or diocesan parish offering a TLM, please share.  This data is  very helpful, and encourages others to seek out and experience the Mass of all ages.  We’re not weird freaks!  We have many good and devout souls and lots of normal and fun people!  We’re all finding out way through this time of unprecedented darkness within and without Holy Mother Church as best we can.  Most of all, we need to all get together and support each other, whether SSPX or ICRSS or FSSP or CMRI or whatever.  Sure we may have differences, but what binds us together, and what threatens all of us, is much, much greater.

More to post later as I have time.  Good news from Las Cruces which I hope to get to early this week, and a report on Bishop Athanasius Schneider’s spectacular Pontifical High Mass at Mater Dei in Irving on 19th Sunday after Pentecost, October 20 2019.

In a Church in Chaos, Don’t Let Perfect Be the Enemy of Good Enough October 17, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in asshatery, blogfoolery, Dallas Diocese, error, foolishness, General Catholic, Latin Mass, pr stunts, sadness, self-serving, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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An article appeared at the generally strong Federalist a few weeks ago, which surprisingly centered on a disgruntled TLM-er – or former traddie – listing the manifest failures of the TLM parish from their point of view.  It seemed to me a rather strange choice for The Federalist, as they normally do politics from a reliably right wing perspective and most often are out there excoriating Never Trumpers, and rightly so.  But, whatevs.   You should read the whole thing.  I’d appreciate your insight on it.

Now, a few things up front. I happen to know the author.  Not really, but I’ve seen him.  He’s been around pretty regularly for several years.  I think he was in one of the choirs at one point. I don’t think I’ve ever spoken to him. And, the parish he was criticizing was my own, or, at least, given that he regularly assisted there off and on for years I’d tend to think it figured largely in his thinking.   I say that out front to let you know that I have a bit of a vested interest in this matter– this is the parish I have chosen to plight my troth with and raise my children in.  I am well aware of the limitations of traditional Catholicism generally in this time of unprecedented crisis, and of the priestly fraternity that operates the parish I attend, and of the parish itself.  The author, Auguste Meyrat, repeats many of the shopworn criticisms of traditional parishes – an ostensible lack of charity, the people are “weird” or “extreme” (but that tattooed, plate-lipped RCIA instructor at Our Lady of Feelin’ Good is groovy), not enough involvement or social outlets for single people in particular, etc.

All this could be taken as a given.  Virtually any parish, anywhere, that has not been led by Saint X, has suffered general lack of virtue.  That is our human nature. Even the parishioners of St. Jean Marie Vianney were the objects of constant, stinging rebukes from that great Saint, and his people were, especially after the first few years, souls who had been formed and influenced by someone virtually all the parishioners knew would be canonized someday.  This is the nature of any moderately sized grouping of people.  Souls gonna sin.  It’s our nature.  That doesn’t mean we don’t constantly strive for improvement.  Of course we do, and we need to hear correction from time to time, especially from our priests, who know our collective and individual failings far better than any layman ever could.

But that’s not my principle problem with this piece criticizing my parish.  My principle problem is the tone, the overall nastiness of the criticisms, the sense of entitlement, and the overweening lack of gratitude present.  To take a few examples (my comments):

………….TLM parishes can sometimes become unwelcoming places that feel more like strange cults than normal Catholic communities.” [oh?  What does a “normal” Catholic community feel like?]

……….This stance often makes some traditional Catholics weird, for lack of a better word. In their minds, countless Freemasons lurk in the shadows, the South really will rise again, monarchy is the ideal form of government, all music after 1700 is sinful, and the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy is the greatest work of literature after the Bible. [Huh.  I find Tolkein boring.  Sorry.  I got 50 pages into The Hobbit and quit.  Funny the author just quoted Taylor Marshall’s Infiltration (I did not include), and now drops this remark about Freemasons.  The South will what?  Monarchy?  Music what? What the heck are you talking about?  Speaking of, the author quotes Father Ripperger lovingly, and yet Father Ripperger has a lot negative to say about virtually any 20th century music.  So which is it?]

They believe the mainstream church is a disgrace, and everything outside the church is an apocalyptic wasteland. In response, they hope to create isolated, self-sustaining communities to buffet the tides of immorality and impiety surrounding them. [Yeah. Exactly.  Seriously, that’s one of the best descriptions for why I’m a traditional Catholic. It’s like the first rule of medicine – first, do no harm.  Protect what you have.  Defend your family.  Most of us find we have more than enough to fill our time doing just that. But some of us do occasionally make efforts to convert the wider culture.]

The more normal traditional Catholics at these parishes often go to great lengths to contain the nuttiness. [Really. Explain how.] Depending on the parish and the priests running it, they may succeed, or else they may find themselves falling into the same patterns. Without occasional outside contact, there is no reality check. [We live in a time where “outside contact” is practically unavoidable.  Be it radio, TV, internet, co-workers, neighbors, family, shopping, etc, the most insulated Catholics of today probably encounter 100 times as many people in a year than the most outgoing villagers and isolated farmers – the normative Catholic of 1700 – did.  This is silly.  Note also the author siting himself with the “normals.”  In this time of rampant sodomy, four year old transvestites, baby murder, drug addiction, unconstrained usury and rapacious capitalism, etc……..is that what’s being called “normal?”]

I could go on, but I’ll desist (in fact, I left out some of the harshest stuff).  I think you have by now gotten the tenor of the piece, and why I take exception to it.  It’s painting with a very coarse brush, and does not give anywhere near the exculpation for supposedly strange Trad behaviors that people might rightly deserve – such as the trauma at seeing friends and loved ones consumed and destroyed by this culture, the hatred and vitriol directed at them by the institutional Church, the destructive errors emanating from virtually every Novus Ordo pulpit every Sunday (let alone Rome and this pope, which the author essentially ignores or downplays to a level of insouciance) that lead souls to destruction in this life and in the next.  Again, I could go on and on.  If some Trads are extreme, if they tend towards a bit of strange behavior, perhaps they could be forgiven, for the damage they’ve incurred and the treatment they’ve been exposed to.

My real riposte to Meyrat, however, would be compared to what ideal are the current afficianados of the TLM so deficient?  Compared to some other parish?  Some Novus Ordo parish, perhaps?  If that’s the case, I’d say there is much more going on here than just a bit of concern about bad attitudes evidenced from time to time.

Or perhaps the comparison is to some hypothetical ideal that exists only in the author’s mind?  I suspect that’s the more likely.  Certainly, compared to some real Catholic communities that have existed, led by exceptional souls cooperating with grace in superhuman ways that have been the ideals towards which all Catholic communities have pointed for 2000 years, every Trad parish falls short.  Of course, so does every Novus Ordo parish, and to a remarkably greater degree.   Those past communities were led by people who now have “Saint” in front of their names.  These saintly communities rarely had to deal with both a culture and a Church in such utter, deplorable crisis and moral depravity.  But, nevertheless, if this is the ideal the author, strongly influenced, it seems, by Father Chad Ripperger, holds, then so be it.  This is rightly the ideal towards which all Catholic communities should aim.

But I still take exception to the type and manner of criticisms made.  I don’t think it’s helpful for people to be made fun of or made to seem ridiculous for failing to live up to the very highest standards of Catholic formation and community life of the past 2000 years, and I think to some extent that’s what’s going on here. In addition, the piece as a whole had far too much of the sense of an almost anthropological examination of some strange tribe, some “other” to be analyzed and criticized, but not joined or properly understood, rather like the author viewed himself as somehow above or separate from the community.

And that’s another point.  Our family has been very involved in this parish for 10 years.  My wife, particularly, knocks herself out, especially with regard to the high school co-op.  I’ve done a thing or two myself.  This is my biggest problem with Mater Dei.  While the parish has grown from 300 to 1800 in 10 years, the same 30 people seem to do 90% of the labor at the parish.  That’s not entirely true, speaking totally extemporaneously, out of every 100 new parishioners about 1 or 2 will come on board and really help out.  It’s a lot easier to just sit back and criticize and find fault, than to join in and help out and build up.  What?

The author was worried that weirdo trads are going to keep the TLM phenomenon from growing.  I think his analysis is quite off here, too. First, we can only plant, God alone gives the increase, but I think these pieces excoriating wide swaths of the TLM movement as strange, mean, and ugly do far more to keep souls away than the behavior of the 3 or 5% of stereotypical angry old Trads.  While I wouldn’t exactly describe this piece at The Federalist as being another circular firing squad amont Trads, it comes close, and does probably more harm than good, certainly more than the author intended.  In fact, I think broad criticisms like this are singularly unhelpful, especially published in a secular venue where lack of nuance can easily lead large numbers of people to develop the wrong idea.

I would also add that it is remarkable that for such deficient community, it is amazing that Mater Dei has managed to grow 600% over the past decade.  If the souls assisting at Mater Dei were anything like the author describes, that growth would have been impossible.  Virtually any other parish, Novus Ordo or TLM, would love to have had such growth over the same timeframe.  I don’t think that is accidental, or would have been possible with such a toxic community as described in the piece.   The same goes for the other regional TLMs in Tyler, Fort Worth, Houston, and Oklahoma City, to varying degrees.

Alright, I’m done defending my parish.  It’s not that I think this parish, or TLM parishes in general, are above criticism.  Certainly, I’ve had some things to say in the past, but generally much more specific and to the point.  It’s more that I think this particular criticism was off base, and may have said a bit more about the author than it did the parish.  Naturally, in matters such as this, your mileage may vary.  If the author had other parishes in mind when crafting this piece, my analysis still applies, though somewhat less forcefully and specifically.  I think the trope of “mean old trads” and traditional Catholic moral deficiences – as a group, as opposed to individuals – needs to die, or at least be something we see far, far less of.  Or of which we see far, far less, for the English teachers out there.

From Promoting Error/Heresy to out n’ out Apostasy, the “Amazonian” Synod Takes Form October 10, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, asshatery, cultural marxism, disaster, episcopate, Francis, General Catholic, horror, Revolution, scandals, secularism, sexual depravity, sickness, the struggle for the Church.
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We knew from the beginning – heck, from the beginning of this pontificate – that Francis and his band of elderly leftists would move to “modernize” the Church by attacking many of the dogmas and disciplines they and their generation have found most offensive – priestly celibacy, the sanctity of life, the sanctity of marriage, and the general moral beliefs of the Church (especially those associated with the 6th and 9th Commandments).  This sin-nod was ginned up on a false narrative (the people of the Amazon region ostensibly desiring certain exceptions for themselves with regard to Catholic moral doctrine), fabricated out of whole cloth on a fantastic basis, and made up of an overwhelming number of like-minded hardcore leftist/modernists (unworthy priests and prelates,  many probably plants from the days of the Soviet Union and its satellite states) which insured that the outcome was determined in advance.

Thus, the grave error and violation of discipline of rejecting priestly (and that of bishops, and probably even popes) celibacy was decided entirely in advance of this synod.  There is no debate, no real discussion.  The participants were chosen specifically for their  lock-step adherence to these manifest assaults on the very nature of the priesthood and the Church.  The synod is just a PR exercise and an attempt to give this violent assault on the Church a patina of respectability.  As one of its leading lights declared, this synod is also meant to approve female deaconesses and pave the way for false female priests.  Again, no discussion or debate.  This entire synod is a production of the German episcopal conference, which is funding it lock, stock, and barrel, and demanding its doctrinal outcome in advance.

But as this supposed synod has gone along over the past few days, it has become apparent that what this group of revolutionaries and Peronists has in mind is not “merely” the overturning of key disciplines and even certain doctrines/Dogmas, but an out and out apostasy against the Church herself.  Just a few samples from the past 2 or 3 days:

There was the pagan ritual held in the Vatican garden, in which Francis freely and happily took part, terminating with Francis offering the Pater Noster in Latin, of all things.  I’m amazed he knew it.

This was followed by subsequent pagan ceremonies within various Vatican City churches.  I must wonder whether this will not culminate with a pagan ceremony, featuring demons as objects of worship, within Saint Peter’s itself before this nightmare is over.

A handful of priests and prelates have vociferously objected to these heinous assaults against the Faith of Jesus Christ.   One of the most notable was (unfortunately, long-retired) Bishop Rene Henry Gracida of Corpus Christi, who described the pagan ceremonies mentioned above in these words:

The participation by Francis the Merciful in the pagan rites held in the Vatican Garden is further evidence of his lack of concern for the canonical penalties he is incurring by his repeated participation in heretical and even occult religious ceremonies forbidden to all Catholics, especially one who sits (invalidly ?) on the Throne of Peter. But then he does not seem to have let the excommunication incurred by him under the law of Universi Dominici Gregis bother him and so the penalties incurred by him with increasing regularity these days become easier to dismiss. A day of reckoning will come for him as it will for each of us.

Blessings,

+The Most Reverend Rene Henry Gracida

Adhuc multiplicabuntur in senecta uberi et bene patientes erunt
Ut adnuntient quoniam rectus Dominus Deus noster et non est iniquitas in eo

(Source: Private Correspondence with the Bishop)

Scene in a Roman church near the Vatican this week

As this synod goes on, it tends further and further from the promotion of specific errors/heresies and more and more towards outright apostasy.  Thus, it came as little surprise today that Francis was quoted by his long-time friend and extremist communist journalist Eugenio Scalfari as holding to the Arian heresy – Francis declared that Jesus Christ was just a man, and not Divine, a heresy settled in the earliest days of the Church:

“Those who, as it has happened many times with me, have had the luck of meeting him and speaking to him with the greatest cultural intimacy, know that pope Francis conceives Christ as Jesus of Nazareth, man, not God incarnate. Once incarnate, Jesus stops being a God and becomes a man until his death on the cross………..

“When I had the chance of discussing these sentences, Pope Francis told me: ‘They are the proven proof that Jesus of Nazareth, once having become a man, was, though a man of exceptional virtues, not at all a God.'”

Now, in the past, many have risen to defend Francis from the reporting Scalfari has made of his numerous interviews with Francis.  They have argued that Scalfari routinely misquotes Francis, or even makes up material out of whole cloth.

But as Rorate Caeli notes, why would Francis repeatedly return to a source that has ostensibly misquoted him over and over again? Why would the Vatican publish the contents of several of these interviews in official Vatican organs?  At the very least, it would appear that Francis is extremely imprudent, to the point of negligence, in using Scalfari to communicate any message of any kind.  Coupling these quotes with yet another non-denial denial from the Vatican PR team, and given the other radicalism and rejection of the Faith occurring during this Synod (most all of these Scalfari interviews have been timed to coincide with synods or other major events), many are now concluding this represents something approximating Francis’ real belief.  And in that case, we could have the first pope not merely to hold to some error on a fine point of theology, but to hold such massive errors, and so many, that they rise to the level of apostasy.  Even if Scalfari made up this statement out of whole cloth, where on earth is the vociferous denial from the Vatican?

It is all of a piece with this synod and this pontificate.  I find it incredibly difficult to believe, at this point, that all these scandals, and all these massive shifts in doctrine and practice are not pointing towards a systematic attack on the Church has shee has been construed lo these past 2000 years.

As Pope Pius X of blessed memory stated, modernism is the synthesis of all heresies.  Once a man falls into the heresy of modernism, there is no limit to the depths to which he will sink, or the errors he will hold.

In truth, though, the Church since Vatican II has been heading in this modernist/leftist/materialist/pagan direction almost uninterruptedly. There has been Assisi I, II, and III, hosted and happily promoted by both of Francis’ predecessors, the “stalwart defenders of the Faith” John Paul II and Benedict XVI.  Certainly, neither predecessor so attacked and poisoned the faith with such determination and apparent glee as Francis, but both did not only permit, but promoted numerous offenses against the pre-conciliar, perennial belief and practice of the Church, beliefs and practices generally settled for well over 1000  years prior to Vatican II and essential to the Church’s understanding of herself.

I used to think the modernists were after the protestantization of the Church, and perhaps the first generation around Vatican II was, but this current generation in power, consisting mostly of men formed in and around the time the revolution was most visibly active in the Church, appears to be after nothing short of the full-on replacement of Christ’s Holy Church with a demonic simulacra.  These men are not wreaking this devastation out of concern for souls. This is not some misguided pastoralism.  That’s the furthest thing from their minds.  They are doing it to try to force the Church to correspond to their own modernist, leftist, pagan, and wholly immoral beliefs and conduct.

They are, in many ways, the ecclesiastical equivalent of the US deep state, and seek the same broad ends – exaltation of their ideology and great wealth and power for themselves, and spiritual and material destitution for just about everyone else – especially those who reject their errors and their assumptions of authority.

And, my good readers, this is just getting started.  This is the beginning of the abomination of desolation becoming ascendant in Holy Mother Church.  As Our Lady said, we will have much to suffer.  Be strong, keep to the Faith, pray without ceasing, and implore God to have mercy on us and on His Church.  Pray especially the Rosary, and adhere to the Faith of our Fathers.  Buy all the good and holy books you can, especially those published by reliable sources and most especially those published prior to 1900 in the US and 1800 in Europe.  Find the best parish/priests you can and nail your foot to the floor if you must. Trust in God, but know that this, barring some unprecedented miracle, is the Passion of the Church, and it will be prolonged.

I pray I may be a fool shouting inanities to himself, and that I have totally misread the situation, but I believe we are better off having our eyes open, than to keep the blinders on and try to pretend that all is fine and normal in the Church, or that the hierarchy, put in place by God to guide souls to Heaven, have not gone disastrously off the rails.

A good summation of our present situation from Dr.’s Taylor Marshall and Tim Gordon, below:

A  photo of a woman suckling a dog – a DOG – in a Roman church.  That’s where these pagans want to go.

One potential good God may draw from this unprecedented crisis – and God almost always draw good even from the greatest evils – is that I increasingly believe Francis and his allies are going to push so far, so fast, that it is going to force a decision point for many souls who would otherwise have tried to go along with happy clappy Novus Ordo church for years to come.  I think if they try to ordain women as priests, there will be an enormous influx out of the Novus Ordo church and into the TLM, especially those parishes operated by explicitly traditional communities like the FSSP and SSPX.  The good would be that many, many more souls may be exposed to the traditional practice of the Faith.  The bad is that there is no way these men are going to leave the traditional communities alone for very long.  They will have to come to them, because the difference between what they are constructing, and the actual Catholic Faith, will be too vast to paper over or ignore.  The TLM communities will also pose an increasing threat to the man-made object these sad (largely) old and corrupt men are trying to sing into being (no matter how bad their song is, or their voices are).  That’s another thing to gird your loins for – the coming attack on the TLM.  But that’s a matter for another day.

So, if you wondered what I thought about Francis and the synod, now you know.  I am not declaring Francis a heretic or even a practical apostate, only that he gives every appearance of being one.  It is up to God to judge, and may He be merciful to me if, despite the mountains of evidence, somehow I err.

Excellent Video Series on Antonio Salazar September 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, history, Restoration, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Antonio de Oliveira Salazar was the leader, some would say dictator, of Portugal from 1934 until his death in 1968.  Unlike Franco’s Spain, his Catholic corporatist Estado Novo (New State) survived him by several years, finally being wrecked by a coup of mid-grade hard leftist officers of Portugal’s military in 1974.

Salazar and the Estado Novo offer an interesting, and much more Catholic, alternative to what the predominant culture tells us are possible viable forms of government since the mid-20th century – hard leftism or liberal/libertine capitalism.  I’ve never been fully on board with such corporatist/distributist economic systems as outlined by Chesterton and Belloc (among many others) in the first half of the 20th century, as they seemed a bit too utopian to be practical.  But Salazar’s Portugal probably came the closest of any deliberately Catholic state (deliberate in the sense of being constructed to comport as closely as possible to the Church’s social and general magisterial beliefs up to that point in time) in achieving a reasonable mean – being Catholic, but also relatively prosperous, relatively free, and relatively non-tyrannical.  Some of my primary complaints against distributism is that it seemed a fine system for the late 18th century, but probably not too well suited for the 21st century.  Salazar’s Portugal serves as probably the best argument against that complaint.

Regarding a tyrannical state, Salazar’s Portugal was much less violent, as a government, than was the corollary next door in Franco’s Spain.  Of course, the Estado Novo had the incalculable benefit of not being founded in the midst of a brutal civil war.  Even still, however, there was a very powerful leftist faction in Portugal, which had held power several times in the decades preceding 1934, and remained a serious threat through much of Salazar’s time in power.  However, by judicously practicing Catholic Doctrine, the Salazar regime only put about 5 souls to death throughout it’s nearly 40  year existence – a far cry from the tens of thousands that died, or were killed, in Spain, even after the end of the Spanish Civil War.  Now, I’m quite sympathetic to Franco’s government and think its hand was forced by the radical, unyielding leftists it had to deal with – these leftists started the Civl War by attacking the Catholic Faith and massacring hundreds of priests and religious – but it is still an impressive achievement.  Salazar had very nearly as divided and fractious a country to manage as did Franco, but managed to do so with far less bloodshed.

Unfortunately, the quite-detailed video series I post below is not complete.  It only goes until about World War II.  Many of Salazar’s greatest social achievements – the economic rebuilding of Portugal along Catholic corporatist lines – had to wait until after World War II.  The author of the series promises that some new uploads will be coming this fall and winter – I will be sure to share those when they become available.

For now, you can learn a great deal about an important, but deliberately forgotten, leader on the world stage for much of the 20th century.  I say he was deliberately forgotten, because Salazar’s Portugal, like (to varying degrees) Franco’s Spain, and Dolfuss’ and Schussnigg’s Austria, and a few other locales, truly do serve as contrary examples to what we are told was the “only sane choice” in the “inevitable” liberal capitalist state.  Not just contrary examples, but examples that, in many ways, are more just, more moral, and – it can be argued – much  more conducive to the good of souls than the  decaying, decadent, corrupt states we find ourselves in throughout the West today.  In terms of tyranny, how many people does the United States kill each year, either here at home or abroad?  I’m no opponent of the death penalty, but it does make for an illuminating contrast.

I hope you enjoy these videos as much as I have.  Since these videos are difficult to find on Youtube, and since, for some reason, many do not show up on the channel’s playlist, I post them all below.  I knew comparitively little about Salazar’s Portugal before watching these, and most of what I had learned was harshly critical, so these videos will hopefully prove enlightening for you as well.  I know you’ll think, there’s too many, it’ll take too long, history is boooring!!!  Do yourself a favor and watch these, at one sitting or over several months, I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised, especially if you have any interest in Church history:

 

Catholic Video Channels You Should be Perusing September 10, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, episcopate, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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This post may contain old news for many readers, but I thought it should be mentioned that the quality of Catholic commentary in video form continues to increase.  While Youtube may be a wholly owned subsidiary of a parent company staffed by many of the most despicable people on earth – Google – it does host some very good Catholic content, at least until Google decides these good people are gaining too much traction, and ban-hammers them off their platform (Bitchute is a good alternative, but  it does contain quite a bit of wacky and even dangerously immoral content, but so does most everything else these days).  Right now, for this particular blogger, probably the best traditional/tradition-leaning Catholic channel on  Youtube (overall) is that of Dr. Taylor Marshall.  I’m a bit surprised at coming to this conclusion, for while I have known Taylor and his family for years in passing through our local TLM parish, for many years I wasn’t a huge fan.  His content seemed to tend towards the conservative/neo-Catholic for quite some time.  So while he did do some great works like being a or the founder of the Troops of St. George, I found him a bit squishy on a number of topics, especially those closest to the core elements of the traditional critique of the post-conciliar Church.

But that was then.  Starting about 12-18 months ago, and especially in the wake of the Vigano expose and the Church’s “summer of shame” (hint: there will be worse to come, much worse), Taylor really got red-pilled and became quite a hard-hitting critic of the crisis in the Church.   His views generally align quite closely with my own, which of course means he is absolutely right about purt’ near everything.  Seriously, I don’t want to overplay my criticism of the Taylor of 5 years ago, he was generally solid all along, but over the past year he’s really been clobbering the evil forces acting within and against Holy Mother Church.   I now make a point of catching all of his videos as early as I can, and agree with most everything both Dr. Marshall and his co-host Dr. Tim Gordon have to say (but not quite – sadly, noone is quite so perfect as me).  They are addressing most all the major crisis issues in the Church today and doing so from a steadfastly traditional viewpoint, and not pulling any punches over sacred cows like the current occupant of the papacy, the heresies emanating from Rome in these dark days, and the root of the crisis beginning far before Vatican II.  I still hope to put together a real magnum opus (hah) podcast on that subject, but baby steps.

Another great source which I have highlighted before is the inestimable Charles Coulombe.  I love his weekly uploads at Tumblar House and find his talks, if possible, even more edifying than those of Taylor Marshall.  Charles is both a rock with regard to the Faith, and is especially strong on the absolutely vital issue of Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus (I cannot recommend his book on the subject enough, it is eye-opening, even for one well-versed in Trad literature), and is also a veritable fount of knowledge on matters related to Church history and Catholic culture (rather unlike the website of the same name).  It is well worth your time to dedicating an hour or so a week listening to his Youtube videos.  While Taylor’s viewership has exploded, Coulombe’s remains relatively static, which is a real shame, because his commentary is equally deserving of a far wider audience.

Next, there is another source I’ve recommended many times, but it bears repeating:  The Fatima Center.  Even with the untimely deaths of Fr. Nicholas Gruner and Mr. Charles Vennari, they regularly upload, almost weekly, very good catechetical materials from extremely traditional sources.  I find especially the videos from Fr. Isaac Mary Relyea edifying and entertaining.

Then, there is Return to Tradition by Anthony Stine.  A bit like Taylor Marshall’s content, it is both contemporary and topical.  In fact, one might liken it sort of a pocket version of Taylor’s much longer broadcasts, covering many of the same topics from a generally similar view (though, of course, they differ in a number of details) but in a much shorter format.  It’s a worthy site, especially his excerpts from Church doctrinal documents in his weekend uploads, but in terms of preference is probably properly listed in terms of order in this post.  HIs production values are of a bit lower standard than the other three.

And, of course, there remains the grand-daddy of all Catholic Youtube channels of which I am aware, that of Sensus Fidelium and the daily uploads of sermons from very solidly orthodox and traditional priests.  I’m certain most all readers will be aware of this channel already.

And now, good listeners, I turn the floor over to you, to solicit other “channels” you may find worthwhile on Youtube or other, similar platforms.  One problem today is the veritable embarrassment of riches, it is difficult at times to keep up with more than a few channels, especially when they produce prodigious amounts of content like Dr. Marshall and Sensus Fidelium. I of course also enjoy the weekly commentaries from Michael Matt at The Remnant, and some other less explicitly Catholic but more historical efforts that still tie in with the Church’s proud history.  Nevertheless, I would appreciate any recommendations you have, especially for solid but lesser known channels.

I have another, far more obscure channel to bring to your attention at a later date, God willing, but that is such a different topic and requires an extensive introduction, and so it must  wait for another time.

 

Michael Matt – Unite the Traditional Clans! August 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Restoration, sanctity, SSPX, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I have learned over the past few months that I have missed an incredible amount of infighting between traditional/orthdox Catholics.  In fact I haven’t missed it at all, I’m glad I haven’t had to witness all that.  With Francis continuing to try to change the Bride of Christ into a pathetic, modernist worldly construct, a creation not of God but of men,  never has there been a greater need for unity among the most devout, believing Catholics, whatever they call themselves.  I have long been of this opinion, which I share with such stalwart defenders of the Faith as Fathers Michael Rodriguez and Isaac Mary Relyea, two men who have suffered more than most of us will ever have to for their rejection of the post-conciliar construct.

There are legitimate criticisms of, or concerns regarding, all branches of traditional Catholicism in these days.  That is one of the chief  coups of the modernists dominating the hierarchy of the Church, to use Catholics own faith and fidelity to the Magisterium against them.  By corrupting that magisterium, they have managed to put Catholics in a “damned if they do, damned if they don’t situation.”  While the SSPX seems to be slowly leaning towards some kind of formal recognition from Rome (and some would argue it already exists), there remains great hostility in the institutional Church to them, and much fussiness over their purported canonical status.  The Ecclesia Dei communities and diocesan priests offering the TLM forever have to live with the taint of ostensible accommodation, and the constant threat that all they have achieved and built over the past several decades could be snatched away in an instant by a hostile pope.

Each of the traditional groups has their strengths and weaknesses.  Certainly there is room for legitimate expression of these differences, but the constant internecine struggles between these various groups has long passed the point of ceasing to be productive, and is most often positively destructive. It is so easy for all of us to fall into tribalism and the belief that “our side” is not just the right one, but the only good and decent one.  From that belief can spring all kinds of animus and destructiveness.  It is the ultimate circular firing squad, and could not be more ill-timed or counter-productive, given the collective threats we all face from the current pontificate and the upcoming Amazonian synod. This should be a time of conciliation, not ever-increasing conflict and strife.

Thus, I heartily support Michael Matt in attempting to bring collaboration and commonality of purpose among all those priests, religious, and lay people struggling to live out the Faith in this time of unprecedented crisis within the institutional Church.  Every single growing, vibrant traditional parish is a beacon of hope for millions of those who call themselves Catholic, whether they realize it or not.  They are a hope for the present and the future, and, in my mind, represent the only real future the Church has, by returning to her roots and her real self.  And, if we continue to work together, we can hope for the coming restoration of Holy Mother Church, as Mr. Matt in describing how the FSSP taking over a dying Minneapolis parish has now totally turned the parish around.  He then lists some criticisms of the FSSP, presumedly coming from the SSPX, and proceeds to refute those.  I’m not certain if his piece was in response to something in particular, but the article could just as easily have been framed in the opposite way, defending the SSPX from FSSP criticisms.  I don’t think the particular framing is most important, I think what is most important is the overall message of looking for the good in all the various branches of traditional Catholicism and working together to maximize their effect in terms of saving souls and, even more importantly, giving all glory and honor to God.

I did, however, want to address a few points Mr. Matt raises, which I will do below:

Yes, okay. Fine!  But the FSSP does not condemn Pope Francis on a daily basis.

Again, true enough. But neither did Edmund Campion run around publicly condemning the tyrant and heretics of his day.  Instead, he chose to dress as a layman—a jeweler—and to call himself ‘Mr. Edmunds’ so that he could avoid arrest and carry on with the important work of preserving the old Faith in Elizabethan England. He wasn’t a coward. He was a strategist, who would eventually be starved, beaten, disemboweled and drawn and quartered for his fidelity the old Faith.

It’s called strategy. Maybe you’ve seen pictures. You know, Father Miguel Pro undercover, dressed in suit and tie, as he waged holy war in defense of the old Faith during the Cristero uprising. Dressed in disguise, was Father Pro afraid to ‘say it like it is’? Please!

There’s more than one way to get the job done, friends, and the job right now is to preserve the old Faith at all costs. ‘Sayin it like it is’ in times like these is sometimes just a really stupid thing to do! It’d be like Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg shouting condemnations of the psycho Nazis as he walked into the Wolf’s Lair with a bomb under his arm, preparing to assassinate Hitler. Not a good time for Claus to ‘say it like it is.’

Let’s not shoot ourselves (or the few good priests left) in the head by calling for recklessness when prudence and strategy are obviously working so well to save souls and to attach so many young people to the cause of Traditional Catholic restoration. [These are all fine points, but I will say that I have heard very strong condemnations of Francis from a number of FSSP priests.  And, I have heard similar condemnations from diocesan and other traditional or traditionally inclined priests.  I don’t know if condemnations of this kind are more frequent and severe from SSPX priests, but I will simply note that it would be a falsehood, in my experience, to declare Francis gets a pass from Ecclesia Dei priests.]

Yes, well, the FSSP priests don’t like the SSPX and vice versa.  Maybe that’s true in some cases, but so what!  The Dominicans and the Franciscans didn’t always get along, either……….. [This is the other point I wanted to touch on, it is true, there are some FSSP and other non-SSPX traditional priests who are extremely critical of the SSPX. Some of this criticism, to my mind, goes beyond the bounds of reason. I know the reverse is also widely true.  However,  many FSSP priests have quite warm attitudes towards the SSPX, and are well disposed towards them, generally speaking.  Like all organizations made up of hundreds of passionate, committed people, you’re going to see a variety of points of view.  That may be a milquetoast manner of speaking, but it’s true.  I wish all priests in all these groups were much more supportive and possessed of a common purpose, but at Mr. Matt notes immediately below, all priests are humans and as prone to human failings as the rest of us].

So, there are precedents. We’re all human…even priests.

Bottom line: When I was at Mass last Sunday at the local FSSP parish, I saw dozens of little children kneeling at the consecration, striking their breasts at the elevation, receiving Holy Communion on the tongue in the company of their mothers and fathers and rafts of siblings.

It reminded me of the little Japanese children I’d seen at the SSPX chapel in Tokyo the month before—kneeling at the consecration, striking their breasts at the elevation, receiving Holy Communion on the tongue in the company of their mothers and fathers and rafts of siblings………

…………I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: Unite the clans! For God’s sake and the sake of those children facing the real possibility of the eradication of the old Faith from the face of the earth— unite the clans!

I couldn’t agree more, or close on a better note.  We have so much in common, and so much to fight for together, that the differences between us can really take a back seat for the foreseeable future.

By the way, Twitter drives people insaneJust sayin‘.  I can not advise anyone enough to stay off it.  None of my rapidly growing into adulthood kids are on it and, I pray, never will be.

 

Watch Michael Davies, William F. Buckley, and Malachi Martin Completely Dismantle Post-Conciliar Amchurch August 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, General Catholic, history, Latin Mass, Restoration, Revolution, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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The video below was recorded in 1980.  Michael Davies, God rest his soul, was a young and very charismatic man who had already written several books defending Archbishop Lefebvre and exposing the protestantizing changes in the Mass.  He had also developed ample evidence that the changes were deliberately made to change the belief and practice of believing Catholics in order to turn the Catholic Church into something other than the entity Christ founded our Holy Mother to be.

That evidence comes to the fore repeatedly as a certain Father Joseph Champlin repeatedly tries, in true post-concliar fashion, to so parse and muddy the Faith that not even licentiates in sacred theology could make heads or tails of what the Church was supposed to believe, what the current pope was promoting, or how the Church fell into the general post-conciliar mess.  Certainly it is true that there were a number of factors at work in, for instance, the total collapse in vocations in historically Catholic/Christian countries (lumping the US in that group for convenience), but to pretend that the loss of 50,000 priests and nearly 100,000 religious in a mere 10 years after the close of Vatican II had nothing, or very little, to do with the massive changes imposed on the Faith in the wake of that council is laughable, as Davies and Buckley repeatedly demonstrate. Fr. Champlin, who was part of the disastrously liberal Dioceses of Rochester and Syracuse in New York, repeatedly had to engage in what I found to be deliberate obfuscation and attempts to so parse matters of theology that virtually no one could rightly claim to know what the Church believed, at least beyond what the most recent pope had declared.  He had to do this because both the Council and the post-conciliar popes at various times and places made declarations in open conflict with the well defined, long-declared solemn Doctrine of the Faith.

This was a regular modernist ruse, reducing the Faith to meaningless or practical indeciperable nonsense that no lay person could hope to comprehend, in stark contrast to the clear belief of the pre-conciliar Church.

Anyway the debate is well worth your time and is a helpful time capsule in understanding how the battle over the mind and soul of the Church was fought in its early days. I would say that traditional critiques of the Council, and more particularly, that false “spirit” that came in its wake, have only sharpened and improved since then.

It is also interesting to point out how even at this point – more than 10 years after the implementation of the Novus Ordo – a large majority of Catholics polled indicated their preference in returning to the Mass of the ages.

Voris Obliterates AmChurch, and Challenges those Blase’ Souls that Sustain It July 19, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Dallas Diocese, different religion, disaster, episcopate, error, foolishness, General Catholic, Revolution, secularism, sexual depravity, sickness, the struggle for the Church, unadulterated evil, Voris.
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Amchurch, Novus Ordo land, the Great Facade………..whatever one wants to call it, Michael Voris obliterates it in the video below (h/t to reader Dismas).

Sort of……..frankly, he doesn’t go far enough.  For Bernadin and McCarrick, Dearden and Hallinan, Hunthausen and Mahony, didn’t fall out of the sky and land in their cathedras.  They were chosen and assigned, by popes dating back to Pius XII in some cases.  These are the popes Monsignor Joseph Clifford Fenton, regarded by several traditonal priests as the greatest theologian this country has ever produced, described as the popes between Saint Pius X and Paul VI as “weak and liberal……..who have flooded the hierarchy with unworthy and stupid men.”  That is to say, Voris identifies two key sources of the crisis in the Church, so far as the United States is concerned, but as always fails to follow the line to its inevitable conclusion.  Fenton was not sede vacantist in the slightest, and the quoted words were private comments pulled from his personal diary after his death, but nevertheless he was openly critical of the papalotry of his time and would be even more so today.  This is where Church Militant continually fails.

It’s a very rough line to draw.  If I had their reach and audience, I, too, would be very careful in how far I went in describing the crisis in the Church and its source, but it rings a little hollow to absolutely excoriate the hierarchy in the United States and say not a word about those in Rome who have selected, empowered, and backed up that hierarchy in all its error and destruction not only in the United States but around the world.

And, of course, today we see the apotheosis – or at least it’s apotheosis thus far, his successor may be far worse, God forbid – of this trend in the dictator pope Francis.

Nevertheless, these reminders of the corruption at the heart of the Novus Ordo establishment are healthy and helpful.  I would love to know how Voris’ video is received by any souls long used to the Novus Ordo church, who believe it to be the normative mode of Catholicism – indeed, for millions, it is the only form they have ever known.  But I am skeptical that many converts will be made by this video.  Perhaps there will be some, and God bless them if they see the light and Michael Voris for all his hard work. But I have found that very few souls happily ensconced in low-demand, happy-clappy, kindergarten-class Novus Ordo land very open to serious critiques of what they know.  Some of the very hardest to reach are the older souls who remember the pre-Vatican II Church, and dutifully followed their mother down this wide path to destruction so many years ago.  Souls who were devout enough to remain faithful even as the Church turned against her very core, her very nature, have a very, very hard time admitting, in the twilight of their life, that any reseverations they had decades ago were well placed, and that the experiment in aggiornamento has been a complete and total failure.  Of course, some of these folks went along quite wilingly, in the spirit of that tragic decade, thinking they really were good and great enough to “sing a new church into being,” to summon a “new pentecost,” one even greater than the first.

Nevertheless, watching this caused me to reflect on that occasional good news that comes out of the Novus Ordo environment, of priests offering Mass in Latin or more Confession, or good assignments made.  I like to think these are positive developments, but if they keep people from making the leap to the TLM and a real traditional Catholic community where the Faith is preached and, to the degree it can be in this sewer of a culture, lived, then they may actually be counterproductive.  It’s possible my own experience, where all these things – more Confession (which I sorely needed and need), more authentic forms of the Liturgy, increasingly solid catechesis from priests as we moved from the “large suburban parish” to the very conservative oddball Novus Ordo parish on the outskirts of the Diocese – pushed me and mine inexorably towards a traditional Latin Mass community.  But that may not be everyone’s experience.  At the same time, I do not feel comfortable criticizing those who are trying, by their own lights, to improve the situation in their parish, and seeing occasional positive moves in that direction.

Another thing Church Militant misses, today – they didn’t used to, at one time they were very much going in the direction of publicly excoriating the ambiguous, deliberately murky, and even blatantly erroneous aspects of Vatican II – is just that.  They don’t get to the root errors that caused Vatican II to happen.  Not at the level of, like Archbishop Lefebvre, accusing the Council.  I’ve been trying to screw up the courage to do a long podcast review of two books, John Courtney Murray, Time/Life, and the American Proposition by David Wemhoff, with a strong whiff of E. Michael Jones about it, and Desire and Deception by Charles Coulombe.  I’ll have to do it as a podcast, otherwise it’d be a 5000 word post I’d never get out.  Both books dwell on possibly the key aspect of the Faith, the practical rejection of which led inevitably to the crisis in the Church today – Extra Ecclesiam Nulla Salus – but one I think is a rather poor and even often misleading effort, and the other is much more spot on.  It’s a subject I’d really like to do proper justice to, so I pray I can finally get around to making a recording and posting it.

Interesting theological seminar at the University of Dallas March 27 March 26, 2019

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Dallas Diocese, fightback, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Restoration, secularism, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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I know the timing is late but Dr. Chris Malloy of the University of Dallas brought my attention to a talk being given tomorrow night, March 27 2019, at the University of Dallas Gorman A hall at 5:30pm.  It is entitled “An Integralist Reading of Augustine’s City of God Against the Secularists.”  It sounds right up my alley.  For those who do not know, “integralist” is a term that I believe originated in France in the late 19th and early 20th century to besmirch those souls who held to the traditional belief and practice of the Faith – that held, in particular, that it was impossible to separate the public and private practice of religion, that they were an integrated whole, and thus the term.  It has become a widespread libel used by leftists/modernists/secularists within and without the Church against Catholics.

Integralism as appropriate Catholic belief has also been almost entirely shunned by the hierarchy of the Catholic Church since Vatican II, and was a point of great contention in the Church in the United States from at least the late 19th century onward, when Americanist bishops such as John Ireland and Cardinal Gibbons exalted the false, condemned liberal orientation of this nation’s Founding document – the Constitution – in extolling “freedom of religion” and especially the no-establishment clause as being perfectly acceptable for Catholics to believe, not only as a temporary modus vivendi in largely protestant country, but also as an ideal to be upheld and exported abroad (and yes I am reading that extremely long book on John Courtney Murray and the American influence on Vatican II and the world at large).  In many ways, the Americanism condemned by Leo XIII metastasized into modernism and eventually the pathetic, fallen secularist Church of the post-Vatican II era.

The presenter for this seminar is a Fr. Edmund Walstein, OCist, who has a website dedicated to informing Catholics of right belief with regard to politics and, more importantly, political systems in the ideal from the Catholic standpoint.  A little bit about the site:

The Josias was founded as the mouthpiece of a small community of men and women seeking to articulate an authentically Catholic political stance from which to approach the present order of society. We are clerics and laymen, academics and professionals, secular and religious. Our goal, broadly speaking, is to make this site a working manual for those who wish to bring their faith into the public square and resist the tides of liberalism, modernism, and ignorance of tradition which have, in the past century, so harmed the Church and tied her hands in the struggle to advance the social reign of Christ.

So, I anticipate this talk by Father Edmund Walstein, OCist, will be of great interest to many readers.  I hope some can make late plans to attend.  I would dearly love to be there, but not only do I have a wife and daughter both with broken right ankles due to soccer injuries right now, but we had already committed to attend a screening of the abortion-reality movie Unplanned in Arlington.  The screening was arranged by someone who rented out the theater for the night, is apparently sold out, and since tickets were in such demand do not feel I can skip it even for a talk of this caliber, much as I’d like to be there.  But, if i can find someone to take my place, maybe I’ll be able to sneak away for this conference.

If you are able to attend, please leave a comment or comments describing the event and its impact.  I am very heartened that UD is hosting a seminar of this kind and pray there may be more of this type in the future.