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Viva El Jefe! Trump Withdraws from Paris Climate Confab June 1, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in asshatery, Basics, cultural marxism, episcopate, fightback, foolishness, Francis, It's all about the $$$, Restoration, secularism, Society, the struggle for the Church, true leadership.
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Even more delicious than Trump’s following through on a significant campaign promise in pulling the US out of the tyrannical and unjustifiable Paris Climate Accord, in spite of several of his closest advisors pushing against doing so (especially his daughter and son-in-law), is the Left’s hysterical reaction.  Their multifaceted religion of sexular paganism has been offended against!  The holy temple of gaia has been violated!  This must not stand!

The Federalist provides a nice rundown of some of the most unhinged responses from #theresistance crowd of Twitter verified assholes:

Billionaire and faux environmentalist Tom Steyer said withdrawing would be a “traitorous act of war.”

Democrat Jon Ossoff warns Trump: “History will condemn” you if US leaves Paris climate deal

Quote fabricator Neil deGrasse Tyson said Trump wasn’t science-y enough to know science things good: “If I and my advisors had never learned what Science is or how & why it works, then I’d consider pulling out of the Paris Climate Accord too.” [Always the preening condescension and self-aggrandizement.  We poor dumb a$$ conservatives just can’t comprehend science]

One of Pope Francis’s right-hand men said it would be “a slap in the face” to the Vatican if Trump did not continue to punish U.S. manufacturers to appease European elites. [This was Msgr. Marcelo Sanchez Sorondo, whose earth-mother worshipping extremism and pro-abortion antics have already been covered several times on this blog]

Let’s expand a bit on Sanchez’ rant, shall we?  From Crux:

Argentine Bishop Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo, Chancellor of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences and the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, said that if Trump takes the United States out of the Paris deal, signed in Dec. 2015, “it would be a disaster for everyone. There’s little else to comment on.”

Sorondo is quoted by the Italian newspaper La Repubblica coming back from a summit at the United Nations devoted to climate change.

“I don’t know what Trump spoke about with the pope,” Sorondo said. “I don’t believe, however, that the conversation was very detailed on climate. I know, however, that the President of the United States spoke about this in the conversation he had with Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican’s secretary of state.”

In that sense, the bishop said, Trump pulling out of the accords would be “a slap in the face also for us,” referring to the Vatican.

The U.S. President has long spoken about pulling out from Paris, and, according to Sorondo, this is motivated by the “oil lobby.” [Of course it is.  Sorondo has used this simplistic, plainly false slur before.]

But wait, there’s more!  The USCCB has to get in on the act, too!

Bishop Oscar Cantú of Las Cruces, Chairman of the USCCB Committee on International Justice and Peace, has urged the president not to pull out of the agreement.

“The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) is on record supporting prudent action to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change,” Cantú said in a statement. [Which are………..what, exactly?  Soaring energy prices leading to potential famine around the world as cheap and efficient sources of energy are blocked for reasons for pure ideology and the desire of the Left to impose communism by enviro-stealth?]

“Our Conference of Bishops has vigorously promoted the teaching of our Holy Father, Pope Francis, on care for our common home,” Cantú continued. “The Holy Father’s encyclical letter, Laudato si’, was timed in order to urge the nations of the world to work together in Paris for an agreement that protects our people and our planet. [So it was more of a political than a doctrinal statement. The Church is now removed from leading the world through morals and timeless Truth, to chasing whatever the latest political fad is in a desperate bid to remain relative.  Gotcha.] We hope the United States will honor the commitment it made there.” [While China, India, Russia, Vietnam, and scores of other countries continue to emit CO2 and actual pollutants at a rate orders of magnitude higher than that of the US.  Even if the US were to entirely ban all fossil fuel use global CO2 emissions would continue to increase because of the less-developed nations, which were by and large given a pass in this accord.  Thus, it has nothing to do with climate, and everything to do with control.]

How long will we have to wait before the backhanded, passive-aggressive attack from Francis against this offense to his one true faith?  Not very long, I wager. In fact, we really already have, because Sorondo is a Francis-creature and given how tightly Francis dominates everyone around him, he did not speak without authorization.

A few more:

This grassroots organizer said Trump’s announcement will prevent everyone from living on planet earth: “Trump just declared war on the very idea of life on earth.”

HuffPo right now: “TRUMP TO PLANET: DROP DEAD”

And a bit more evidence that many of the “conservative” Never Trumpers are actually leftists in disguise, or are at least too afraid to offend their progressive betters:

If today were opposite day, we could say that The Wall Street Journal‘s Christopher Mims’s response to the news is very reasonable: “As a species we flunked the collective action problem that is carbon emissions. It’s now adapt or die. And I’m not a techno-utopian.”

The radical Left and the democrat party – but I repeat myself – are now so hurt at the surprise of Trump’s win and offended at his existence that if he literally cured all forms of cancer tomorrow they would still portray Trump as the devil.

But I think we conservatives need to get used to the idea that this is how they will react from now on to ANY relatively conservative winning the White House (as opposed to a RINO big-government statist like the Bushes, but even then they lost their minds).  This is how they are going to behave from now on when they don’t get their way.  They have all the intelligence and maturity of a 4 year old having a sobbing screaming temper tantrum.

I really don’t know how this country stays together.  It is almost entirely the Left’s fault, this descent into mutually hostile ideological camps ready to visit violence upon the other.  I agree with Ace, about the best outcome now is a civil, peaceable divorce along geographic lines, which means Texas as an independent nation or part of a south-central conservative conglomeration.  The longer that divorce is delayed, the uglier and more bitter the final split will be.

 

Upcoming Processions for the Anniversary Year of Fatima May 15, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Dallas Diocese, Eucharist, fun, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Our Lady, Restoration, sanctity, Society, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, Virtue.
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I really really meant to get this post out last week, but due to the death in the family and travel, I was unable to do so.

Because of that, the first of 6 Marian processions to be held at Mater Dei parish in Irving on the 13th of the month from May to October has already passed.  Sorry about that.  The turnout was great.  I’d say close to 300 people.  While certainly intended for regular parishioners, everyone is welcome to attend these processions and, of course, to avail themselves of the Sacraments at Mater Dei at any time.

The details for the remainder are below:

Yes it is also important to note that the International Pilgrim Virgin Statue will be at Mater Dei on June 22nd, as shown above.

The other announcement concerns a diocesan Eucharistic Procession for Corpus Christi being held June 17:

Yes I know the Feast of Corpus Christi is June 15.  I did not schedule the event.

FYI, there is a Mass before the procession at 5:00 pm at Most Holy Trinity parish on Oak Lawn but given that parish’s reputation…….well, you are forewarned.  I have had recent experience of Novus Ordo Masses due to the death in the family and all I can say is that it was a travesty.  Instant canonization.  I stood up and addressed the 200 odd souls present, imploring them to pray for the deceased (not at Mass, at the non-standard Rosary and wake the night before).  Several thanked me for that afterward.

The priest refused to distribute the Blessed Sacrament, so I did not receive.  So typical of San Antonio, the choir director and some lay liturgical coordinator (both female) – I have no idea what their formal role or title is- just dominated events, with the priest sitting back as a dude who steps in to just sort of confect the Sacrament and then get out of the way.  He did give a sermon, but it was far more entirely to assuage the feelings of the bereaved, with nothing about praying for the deceased.  The entire ethos conveyed seemed to be that this life is the only source of our trials and sufferings, and that essentially everyone (except actual Catholics, mean and nasty as they are, believing all those harsh old things) goes to Heaven instantly upon death, where its sunshine and lollipops forever.

I could say a great deal more but won’t.  And this was one of the, reputedly, less heterodox parishes in SA.

FSSP Priest Interview Reveals Divisions within Fraternity April 25, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, Basics, foolishness, General Catholic, huh?, Latin Mass, priests, Restoration, Revolution, sadness, Society, SSPX, the struggle for the Church, Tradition.
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I got sent a link to the following post this morning by reader TT.  It’s an interview of the rather small German province of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter, the organization of priests dedicated to the traditional Mass that was founded by some who “broke away” from the SSPX at the time of the illicit consecrations of 4 bishops in 1988.

This interview is already being picked up as fodder for the endless (and tiresome) SSPX/FSSP debates that have been raging for almost 30 years.  For those who already feel the FSSP is hopelessly compromised, the interview is being taken as proof of the correctness of that view.  For those with internal knowledge of the Fraternity, as it is typically called, however, this interview only reiterates the divisions already well known within this society of priests.

I’ll add comments to the post I copy below, because I think there are some important things to clarify/note, but I’d like to make one point clear at the outset: every grouping of more than a few individuals is going to have disparity of belief.  Once you get into the hundreds, like the FSSP, there is going to be a whole range of belief.  Given that, generally speaking, both acceptance of a more stridently traditional outlook (or a certain, sometimes severe, hostility to Vatican II) and friendliness/sympathy for the SSPX varies inversely with the age of the priest and their closeness to the original point of division in 1988.  That is to say, older priests in the Fraternity, especially those who were present in 1988 and made the decision to leave the SSPX, generally tend to be more accommodating towards the post-conciliar ethos and hostile towards the SSPX.  Younger priests are generally more hardcore “traditional” and more friendly towards the Society.

This is not a universal rule and there is infinite nuance, even within individual priests!, but that’s probably the broad norm.  I would also add that there is, as I understand it, a certain division of belief between priests of the Fraternity in the Americas, and those in Europe, with those again in Europe tending towards being the less ardently traditional, or the more accommodating.  Having said that, I concur with a commenter at 1Peter5 that this is far from an inspiring interview.  While I think the interview is being presented in a fairly negative light by Maike Hickson at 1Peter5, I think I can also say these are some of the most unhelpful comments I’ve seen from an FSSP priest in print, perhaps less for what they say (esp. on reflection) but for the sense they seem to convey of accommodation, of being (to quote some commentary I’ve seen) “modernist lap dogs who will do anything so long as they can continue to offer the ‘old Mass'”.  Then again, I find myself defending the priest quite consistently below – I think that while he exhibits an attitude far different from what I’d like to see expressed, it’s not entirely surprising given his past.

So keep that in mind as you read the below, which many of you perhaps already have:

The usually cautious and reserved Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) has now given its current opinion concerning the Society of St. Pius X (SSPX) and on its possible formal re-integration into the structures of the Catholic Church. Father Bernhard Gerstle – the head of the German district of the FSSP – just gave a 24 April interview to the German Bishops’ official website Katholisch.dein which he explains many of the positions and opinions of his priestly fraternity. (Father Gerstle is the same priest who, in 2016, made a politely critical statement about the papal document Amoris Laetitia.) [An important note of clarification.  Fr. Gerstle may be the head of the German district of the Fraternity, but I think it a great leap to derive from that that he is speaking for the mind of the entire Fraternity.  Words of Fr. John Berg, former Superior of the entire order, in Latin Mass Magazine from 2015 (which I haven’t to hand) were far different and conveyed a far more traditionally Catholic understanding.]

Father Gerstle explains, first of all, that he himself split off from the SSPX because of the “illicit episcopal consecrations” in 1988 which, in his eyes, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger tried to forestall. (Interestingly, and just in the recent past, there have been voices saying that Cardinal Ratzinger, as pope, later removed the excommunications of the four SSPX bishops because he realized that he had contributed to the intensification of that earlier conflict. Worth noting is that, Bishop Athanasius Schneider, who has served as an official Vatican liaison to the SSPX, recently called this act of excommunication an “injustice.”) [This little aside causes me to wonder whether the author is not trying to inculcate a bit of doubt, even resentment, towards Fr. Gerstle.  Sure “some voices” may say that, but lots of others say that the excommunications were wholly right and just. Obviously Fr. Gerstle is going to have a bias since he left the SSPX over this matter.  I am curious as to why Hickson chose to introduce this seeming rebuttal right here.] In Gerstle’s eyes, the 1988 breach happened due to a “lack of trust toward Rome.” He also claims that many more priests within the SSPX had disapproved of the episcopal consecrations, “but did not make the final step.” Thus, there were “only a few priests and seminarians who left the Society of St. Pius X at the time [in 1988].” Gerstle explicitly says that the foundation of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter happened “essentially due to Cardinal Ratzinger, [who was] then head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.”  [For those of us who weren’t involved, I don’t think it is easy to comprehend the depth of feeling on both sides involved in the 1988 consecrations.  This was an event so trying and so radicalizing I don’t think many today fully realize the effect these events had on the participants.  As one who was directly involved and experienced that heart-rending time, I don’t find Fr. Gerstle’s comments out of place.  There are many involved who share his views, and of course, many who don’t, but it’s not like he’s breaching some radical new concept no one’s ever said before, even those who are very attached to the traditional practice of the Faith.]

Father Gerstle further distances himself from those smaller groups within the SSPX – whom he calls “hardliners” – who “reject the Second Vatican Council to a large extent, for example with regard to religious freedom or as to the decree on ecumenism.” Some of them, he says, also doubt the validity of the new liturgy. Gerstle makes it clear, moreover, where the Fraternity of St. Peter stands with regard to the Second Vatican Council: [No, he gives his own opinion.  Unless he directly stated he was speaking as the voice of the entire Fraternity as a matter of policy – which if he did, we can be certain Hickson would be trumpeting this from the rooftops – then he’s giving his opinion, which Hickson is taking to mean it is the policy of the Fraternity because of his position, but I can say from direct experience there are many Fraternity priests who do not conform to the views expressed in this para or the one below. As to the divisions within the SSPX, these are well known and I find pointing them out wholly unremarkable.]

The Fraternity of St. Peter, however, has accepted to study without prejudice the conciliar texts and has come to the conclusion that there is no breach with any previous magisterial statements.However, some texts are formulated in such a way that they can give way to misinterpretations. But, in the meantime, Rome has already made here concordant clarifications which the Society of St. Pius X should now also recognize. [Emphasis added] [I would say the situation now remains as it has been, vague, uncertain, and unclear.  Some tradition-friendly individuals in the Curia have made clarifications, they have expressed their opinions, but that is far from saying there has been a wholesale clarification of the problematic aspects of Vatican II. Rome appears willing to say almost anything to get the SSPX regularized.  But whether these stands hold after that occurs is anyone’s guess, but there remains a huge monolith of progressive-modernist opinion in the clergy and hierarchy that VII is perfect, the best expression of the Faith ever conceived, and that the Church was literally re-born in 1965.  That remains an extremely dangerous ideology that has not been washed away by a few conciliatory comments from folks at the Ecclesia Dei commission.]

Additionally, Father Gerstle insists that for the FSSP, the new 1983 Code of Canon Law is the standard. In his eyes, the SSPX has here some more reservations. For the FSSP, explains Gerstle “there is not a pre- and a post-conciliar Church.” “There is only the one Church which goes back to Christ,” he adds. Gerstle also insists that the FSSP does not “wish to polarize or even to promote splits,” but that they wish to instill in their own parishes “an ecclesial attitude.” Certain (unnamed, unspecified) abuses in the Church should only be criticized in a “differentiated and moderate way.” [We are only getting very partial and bifurcated comments.  I don’t read German so I can’t go to the original and Google translate is too unreliable in such fine points.  Having said that, I find these comments disappointing and far too conciliatory towards the post-conciliar construct.  Then again, we do not know what pressures the Fraternity is under right now, but I understand they are considerable and the dangers great from those who would like to do to the ED communities what has been done to the FI’s.]

Father Gerstle also distances himself from the concept “traditionalist” when he says: “This notion I do not like at all to hear. We are not traditionalists, but simply Catholic.” As Catholics, he says, “we appreciate tradition,” but without “completely blocking organic adaptations and changes.” [This one I have no problem with.  Some of the most informed readers of this blog eschew the term traditional, and say that what we practice is simply the Catholic Faith as it has always been believed, understood, and lived.  There is nothing remarkable about “organic changes” either.  VII was wholly inorganic.]

The worthy celebration of the traditional liturgy, together with a loyal teaching of the Catholic Faith, is at the center of the work of the FSSP, according to Gerstle. “Salvation of souls” and “eternal life” are their Fraternity’s own concern. Unfortunately, adds the German priest, “the Four Last Things have been widely neglected in the Church, with the effect of a belittling and attenuation of sin and of a loss of the practice of sacramental confession.” [I would hope this is uncontroversial.  In fact, one could take from this a tacit rebuke of the post-conciliar construct, where the Mass is typically deplorable and the “teaching” counterfeit.]

Father Gerstle sees that “one cannot simply introduce everywhere again the old liturgy and, so to speak, impose it upon people.” “Both rites thus [with the help of the “reform of the reform”] should enrich each other,” explains the priest. Certain elements of the new liturgy could be “enriching for the extraordinary form of the Roman Rite.” [He’s just parroting PBXVI here, but I am personally extremely leery of any “enrichment” flowing from the NO to the TLM.  I think there is virtually nothing in the NO that would “improve” the TLM.]

Moreover, Father Gerstle also explains that, in the German district, there are growing numbers of faithful who are interested in the traditional Tridentine Mass. Some of the FSSP Masses have “100 to 180 faithful” in attendance. He admits, however, that the FSSP has not too many vocations. “All in all we have a good number of incomers [16 new priests in 2016 and currently some 100 seminarians altogether], but it is not so that we are under pressure due to high numbers of vocations.” [The Fraternity is generally doing better in North America, where there is a certain pressure to grow the seminary.  As for Mass attendance, the local FSSP parish is now attracting 1200+ on a typical Sunday.  That is unusual, but the growth is consistent throughout, and I pray all the other tradition-oriented groups are experiencing the same or better.]

At the end of this interview, Gerstle explains that the SSPX faces a dilemma: either Bishop Fellay chooses unity with Rome and will have a split within his own organization, or he will choose unity within the SSPX and will not have unity with Rome.  The German priest explains, as follows:

I think that the current Superior General, Bishop Bernard Fellay, will have to decide between unity with Rome and unity within the Society of St. Piux X. The realists within the leadership will then hopefully realize that there is no alternative to a reconciliation with Rome.

I find the first part of this analysis to be insightful, but I think anyone who has followed the situation even as casually as I have has reached about the same conclusion.  I also think the second part is right, though I continue to have doubts as to whether now, with Francis in charge, is the right time.  The man has a demonstrated track record of deliberately targeting tradition-embracing groups for destruction.  But may God’s will be done.

As for the interview, this is absolutely not what I would prefer to see from a leading Fraternity priest.  But I’m not sure it confirms the fatal weakness of the Fraternity, either.  Does having a regular canonical status involve some compromise?  Absolutely*.  And folks in the SSPX had better be FULLY cognizant of that fact when they sign their “deal” with Rome.

Well I don’t post for a week then you get a novella.  Lucky you.  Sorry folks, posting is going to be infrequent for the foreseeable future.  I had a very  unusual situation for first 76 months of this blog’s history but that period is definitively order.  I probably would not have posted today if this matter hadn’t hit so close to home.  We’ve had a nightmare bronchitis/pneumonia go through our family that takes weeks to get over.  I’m still fighting it but am back at work but also playing lots of catchup.  Hope to get another post out tomorrow but who knows.

*-but so far, only of a limited and generally unobtrusive (or undamaging) sort.  The “gravitational pull” of an unreconciled SSPX probably plays a role in the limited nature of the compromises forced on the FSSP – which is why I fear regularization for the entire restoration of the Faith.  But ultimately God is in charge and we have to want what is best for the salvation of souls, which everyone (not really, but lots) tells me is regularization.  So it must be it.

Gentle Reminder: Switch from the Angelus to the Regina Caeli April 17, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, Liturgical Year, Our Lady, priests, religious, Restoration, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Victory, Virtue.
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I remembered this year, to start praying the Regina Caeli, as opposed to the Angelus, on Easter day.  Sometimes in the past, it’s taken me a day or three to remember.  I’m sure most of you have not had this problem, but if any have, here is your reminder.

To beef out the post a bit, a few pictures from Good Friday:

It was nice having a religious priest present during Holy Week

I pray you are enjoying this glorious Octave.  I think next year I will take off less time before Easter and more time after.  I’ve taken off most of Holy Week for years, but I feel ready for a change.  I’d like to enjoy the great feast more, and not just go back to work the day after Easter. I’ve always enjoyed that aspect of Christmas.  I wish I had the time to take off the entire week of Easter, but that’s not going to happen.  Oh for the days when working men had every great feast day off work, a true holy day holiday!

The Revelations of Fatima Hold the Key to Our Salvation April 5, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Our Lady, Restoration, sanctity, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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UPDATE: See, when I type a post in Word instead of on the blog itself, sometimes I forget to put a title on the post.  Fixed.

From Fatima: The Great Sign, an excerpt that conveys the twin lessons stemming from Our Lady’s sharing a vision of hell with the three saintly children Lucia, Jacinta, and Francisco: the reality of eternal damnation and the paramount need for all faithful souls to constantly practice prayer and penance.  This post would probably have been better placed towards the start of Lent, but that’s not how it worked out.  Nevertheless, the lessons below are not just for Lent, but for our entire lives.  Prayer and penance are the primary means by which we can escape the snare of the devil in this evil fallen culture and cooperate with Grace to obtain the only end that matters: spending eternity with God.

The excerpt starts after the three children have seen the vision of hell.  Little Jacinta was most affected by this terrifying revelation:

The vision of hell had the greatest impact on little Jacinta.  She became obsessed with the sight of those red, raging flames and the terrifying  sight and sound of millions of screaming demons  and lost souls.  “Oh hell!” “Oh hell!” she would wail, wringing her hands impotently.  “Mother of God have pity on those who do not amend their lives.”  “If men only knew what awaits them in eternity, they would do everything in their power to change their lives.” [But we do know. We have the Scripture and Tradition, and few men who refuse to listen to those would not even be moved by a direct personal revelation] Frequently she would call to her brother saying: “Francisco, are you praying with me? We must pray very much to save souls from hell.  So many go there.  So many.”  At other times she would ask Lucia: “Why doesn’t Our Lady show hell to sinners? If only they saw it, they would never commit sins again.” On one occasion she said to Lucia: “Look, I am going to Heaven soon, but you are to stay here.  If Our Lady lets you, tell everyone what Hell is like so that they won’t sin anymore and not go there.”

In the light of these and other heroic penances practiced by the children, it is not difficult to see why Our Lady requested that the revelation of hell be kept a secret.  Had it been divulged, no one would have believed it.  In the parable of Dives and Lazarus, Our Lord stated that even if someone returned from the dead to warn of hell, no one would pay any attention……..

……The three children undertook the most severe penances for the salvation of sinners.  They wore a rope tightly around their waists; they have their lunches to the poor, or even to their sheep; they didn’t drink during the furnace-like heat of August 1917 – an almost unendurable penance as anyone who has stayed in Fatima during that month will appreciate.  Later, Jacinta even wanted to drink water from a pond frequented by cattle.  However imprudent this would be, the thought of hell dominated every consideration of hygiene, discomfort or pain………

……….To the necessity of penance for sinners must also be joined that of prayer.  Our Lady constantly reminded the children to pray a great deal and they readily responded by spending long hours on their knees under a blistering sun, reciting the Rosary and the angel’s prayer over and over again.  Recently, Lucia, who is now a Carmelite nun in Coimbra [and of course since deceased], stressed the imperative need of prayer to counter the flood of evil today.  In a letter to a nephew (who is a Salesian priest) she wrote: “It is sad that so many are allowing themselves to be dominated by the diabolical wave that is sweeping the world and they are so blind that they cannot see their error.  Their principal mistake is that they have abandoned prayer…….What I recommend to you above all is that you get close to the tabernacle and pray.  In fervent prayer you receive the light, strength and grace that you need to sustain you……In prayer, you will find more science, more light, more strength, more grace and virtue than you could ever achieve by reading many books or by great studies………Never consider the time wasted that you spend in prayer. You will discover that in prayer, God communicates to you the light, strength and grace you need to do all He expects of you………

We all need to intensify our life of intimate union with God and this we can only attain through prayer…..Let time be lacking for everything else, but never for prayer…….The principal cause of evil in the world and the falling away of so many consecrated souls is the lack of union with God in prayer.  If we are not careful and attentive in obtaining the strength from God, we will fail because our times are very bad and we are weak. Only God’s strength can sustain us.

Immediately after the vision of hell and Our Lady’s appeal for devotion to her Immaculate Heart, she outlined the future facing mankind if her requests were accepted, and alternatively if they were rejected…….

———End Quote———

Sadly, they have, by and large, been rejected.  The world, and in particular the former Christendom, have spun out of control and seem headed towards and inevitable crash.

As for our personal conduct, however, I don’t think anything else needs to be said.  Prayer and penance are vital. Only God’s strength can sustain us.  Hell or Heaven, it’s entirely our choice.  May God have mercy on us all.

Saint Aloysius Gonzaga – Model of Christian Youth April 4, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Restoration, Saints, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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A little excerpt from Saint Aloysius Gonzaga: Patron of Christian Youth by Fr. Maurice Meschler, SJ, which concerns the first great flowering of sanctity in the youth of 10 (pp. 34-5), when he made the decision to consecrate his purity to Our Lady for his entire life.  While this Saint certainly enjoyed the benefit of particular Graces and his example, while an incredible case of sanctity, is one that is vital for young people of all times to strive to emulate, especially in this fallen age.  Not all may be called to his very nearly perfect practice of chastity and purity, but all will benefit from attempting to conduct their lives in accord with his example, especially the young who face so many temptations, and who lack the experience of life that many wiser, older, sadder souls have obtained – much to their pain:

About this time a book on the Rosary, by Fr. Caspar Loarte, SJ, fell into the hands of Aloysius.  It so increased his love and devotion to Our Lady, tha this heart overflowed with consolation when he reflected upon the mysteries of her life, and he was seized with an ardent longing to do something that would please her and give her great honor, that he might thus win her love and favor.  One day, as he was kneeling in rapt devotion before the picture, he was inspired with the thought of consecrating his virginity to Our Lady, as the most acceptable gift that he could offer her.  Acting quickly on this inspiration, with a heart filled with love and joy, he solemnly consecrated himself to her by a vow of perpetual chastity.  Mary accepted the offering of his innocent heart, and in return, as he afterwards acknowledged to his confessor, obtained for him from God the extraordinary Grace of never experiencing throughout his entire life the slightest breath of a temptation against the virtue of holy purity.

This is a most unusual favor, seldom granted even to the Saints, and the more wonderful, seeing that Aloysius’ life was passed in the higher circles and at princely courts, where there are so many dangers and temptations.  it is true that he had had from his earliest childhood a natural aversion to the very shadow of anything impure, and even to any intercourse whatever with persons of the opposite sex; but this gives us all the more reason to wonder that, after taking his vow….he redoubled his precautions and had recourse to all kinds of means in order to guard his purity against the slightest shadow of danger.  It might be thought that he, who enjoyed such privileges, would have contented himself with the ordinary care prescribed to all Christians; on the contrary, he it is who most exceeds most, even of the Saints, in precautionary measures such as flight from the very slightest occasion of sin, and mortification of the flesh.  He, who was preserved by a special grace of God from any temptation of this kind, went on his way through life as though he had been threatened on all sides by special dangers.

From this time he accustomed himself to never raise his eyes, either in company or when going through the streets.  He not only avoided all intercourse with women more scrupulously than ever, but he withdrew from all games and amusements, although his father would have wished him to take part in them.  He now began to inflict all kinds of austerities upon his innocent flesh.  Aloysius’ vocation was that he should be a striking and a bright example for youth, in the preservation of angelic purity.  What was unnecessary for himself, was to be done by him for the sake of those who were to follow him – for the general welfare of Christian youth.

The young are not proof agaisnt danger as he was, and yet they often rush thoughtlessly into it; the fire of concupiscence burns within them, and they willfully add fuel to it; they are not so blameless as Aloysius, and yet they will not hear of mortification, vigilance, and seclusion.  The picture of this holy youth is a warning, an earnest admonishment to the world of frivolous, self-indulgent  young people, bent upon the enjoyment of sensual pleasures.

———-End Quote———

Raising children in the moral sewer of the fatally corrupted culture with which we are confronted is especially challenging.  In centuries past, there were cultural/societal norms in many places and times that helped keep many temptations to concupiscence in check.  Parents then did not have to deal with the mass availability of pornography and other destructive forces brought directly into the home.  They did not have to tell their children to avert their eyes from scandalously pernicious advertisements or scantily clad individuals.  There was no mass media bringing temptations to lust, perversion, self-abuse, and destructive behaviors of every kind into the home, the car, the school, etc., on a constant basis.  There were certainly temptations in those days, to be sure, but these past several decades have seen the attack on innocence rise to levels never seen before in history.

It can be a difficult line to walk, shielding children from dangerously seductive immoral influences, while at the same time not keeping them under practical lock and key.  There are certainly reasonable and prudent steps that can be taken: homeschooling, having a good internet filter/reporting system installed on ALL computers, not just the one(s) you think your kids access, not subscribing to cable or satellite TV systems, monitoring children’s friends and social engagements, carefully choosing what music kids are exposed to, etc.  All these things are good and reasonable.  Even more, parents should guard against perceptions of hypocrisy in frequently allowing for themselves what they deny their children.

One might think in this age it is not possible to go too far in efforts to preserve their innocence, but even here there can be danger. Tightening the apron strings too much can lead to its own form of rebellion.  I have seen this happen several times, and have heard numerous cautionary tales from priests, of parents who placed such a tight hold on their children they eventually rebelled and slipped through their fingers. In fallen creatures, protection can unintentionally turn to severity, good intentions can morph into forced submission to the parents’ will in all matters.

An absolutely vital step for parents to take is to engage in family prayer, especially prayer of the Rosary.  While preserving children’s innocence is absolutely vital, the preservation will not be successful unless buttressed with a vibrant interior life.  Parents must set the example here, demonstrating to children the great value of prayer and the concrete benefits such devotion provides in the formation of a devout, pious soul.

I could go on forever.  It’s an exceedingly difficult high wire act to perform, raising kids in this age.  And sometimes, even with practically ideal family life, kids still fall away.  But if they have been given the gift of a strong interior/devotional life, odds are for most that fall will be temporary, and, God willing, the kids will return to leading a morally upright life and the practice of the Faith.

A Little Beautiful Catholic Culture: Saint Benedict Center Sings Byrd’s Ave Verum March 29, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, religious, Restoration, Tradition, Virtue.
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This is the Saint Benedict Center in New Hampshire, the one with the catholicism.org website.  Sensus Fidelium added the following description on  Youtube:

On October 22, 2016 the Brothers and Sisters from Saint Benedict Center, with some students and volunteers, went to The Arbors of Bedford, an Assisted Living Facility in New Hampshire, to sing and play for the residents. Here is our recording of William Byrd’s Ave Verum.

Great, and really well suited to this time of Lent!

Join Father Jason Cargo on Rosary Walks in Richardson March 22, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Dallas Diocese, fun, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, North Deanery, Our Lady, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Continuing a tradition he began a year or two ago while pastor of Immaculate Conception Parish in Corsicana, Fr. Jason Cargo of St. Joseph parish in Richardson is conducting daily Rosary processions in public this Lent in order to evangelize and witness to our glorious Faith, in addition to rendering publicly the honor and glory rightly due to God.  You have to check Father’s Facebook page for the time and location, which varies from day to day as Father seeks to witness to as much of the city as possible.  Starting times and locations for this week are given below:

Thursday 3/23 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Friday 3/24 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Saturday 3/25 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Sunday 3/26 at 4:00 pm (Lookout Park)
Monday 3/27 at 4:30 pm (Ridgecreek Dr. and Bellview Court)
Tuesday 3/28 at 6:00 pm (Sherrill Park Golf Course)
Wednesday 3/29 at 5:30 pm (Ambleside and Pickwick)

YALE ELEMENT. is on Yale and Collins. meet at parking lot that faces Yale Park.

LOOKOUT PARK can be accessed off of Lookout Drive and Plano

Ridgecreek Dr. and Belleview Court is the intersection of two streets. Its in the neighborhood of Windmill stables off of Jupiter.

SHERRIL PARK GOLF COURSE – is accessed off of Lookout and Jupiter

Ambleside and Pickwick – can be accessed off of Renner and Owens

A nice video on the effort was put out by Texas Catholic, the diocesan media platform:

Good Father Cargo.  Rockin’ the cassock and cappa romana.  He is really a good priest.  I pray he is well received at St. Joseph and that his apostolate reach more and more souls.

I am really sorry I did find out about this sooner, as Lent is about half gone.  I suspected Father Cargo would take up this great work of mercy and faith since his reassignment to St. Joseph around Easter last year, but not being on Facebook I missed it until I saw about this on Youtube. That’s the second time today I’ve missed some big news because I’m not on Facebook.  But I’m setting up a reminder to check Father’s Facebook, which I can do without rejoining, next week to help get the word out.

If you have time and live or work in the Richardson/North Dallas area, consider joining Father on one of his “walks.”  They usually take about 45 minutes and cover 1 1/2 miles, praying all 15 decades of the Rosary.

I really like this kind of effort and it makes me feel rather ashamed I’ve let the prayer vigils outside strip clubs lapse.  As Father Cargo says, we never know what fruit giving such public witness of our Faith will yield – not only for those on the outside, but also for ourselves.  I pray that more priests take the time to do such good works.  Father Cargo is pastor of a huge parish but he is still prioritizing these efforts at evangelization.  May God bless him and all those who participate abundantly.

And please pray for him!  Our good priests are always especially under attack, from both the world and the devil and the fallen angels.  Pray Father is able to do all that good he wants to do, which is substantial.  He was very generous with me in something I was trying to do at one time and I shall not forget that.  Deo Gratias!

Image from Father’s Facebook, I pray he doesn’t mind.

Prayer for Self Control March 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, mortification, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Continuing in this impromptu Lenten series of prayers for establishing a holy and virtuous home life, a prayer/meditation on maintaining self-control at all times.

I am definitely of a quick tempered disposition.  I inherited many things from my father’s side of the family, many very admirable attributes, but this is probably one that is on the debit side.  My paternal grandmother said her father-in-law, my great-grandfather, was the meanest man she ever met.  My dad had a really hard time with his father, who was an extremely hard worker but also extremely demanding. I believe, Deo Gratias, there has been a certain process of mellowing from one generation to the next, but the tendency towards a quick temper – which subsides as quickly as it comes on – has remained.  Also, both my grandfather (lifelong farmer) and father (farm raised/construction/gas fields) were notorious abusers of the language, using foul words as a matter of course, and that’s been another bad habit I’ve struggled against.

That is to say, this prayer from Father’s Manual by Fr. A Coomes, SJ, is something I can really appreciate.  It would be ideal, I guess, if readers could say “this is definitely not a problem for me!,” but I tend to doubt that’s the case.  Note, tendency towards excessive anger is not the only area of self-control addressed, but in raising a whole bunch of kids, it is often among the most prevalent:

Lord Jesus, You told us to learn of  You because You are meek and humble of heart. Teach me Your way of meekness that I may control my mind, my heart, and my tongue.

Give me the manly calm and self-control needed to be an example and inspiration to my family.

Help me to be a considerate husband – to be a true comfort to my wife……..and never quarreling or peevish.  May I be at all times sympathetic, and may my words never be bitter to bring her sorrow.  May I always be understanding, unselfish, and thoughtful in sharing with her the family problems we experience.  Let me be ready to conciliate differences with understanding and never be domineering.

Teach me to be a patient father to my children, inspiring them always by word and example.  May my words always be words that direct and help them, and never words that wound.  When I must correct them, let it not be in anger. And, if I must be firm in my corrections, let me never be crude or harsh.

Let me never use rude or impatient words before my wife and children, nor display an uncontrolled or ill-considered action, which must certainly be a reproach to me afterwards when I contemplate the gentleness and calm of your meek and humble heart.

Finally create in me a spirit of true familial leadership, where I embody all the virtues necessary in a father, husband, and head of the domestic church entrusted to my care.  May I display none of the vices of selfishness, pride, indifference, or failure of leadership. May I in all things lead my family according to Your holy will, for which I will be judged most severely at my death.  May my wife and children submit to my role as leader of the family entrusted to me with willingness and humility.

Please bless our family abundantly and provide us with a joyful and happy Christian home.

———End Quote———

It is a great challenge, adequately balancing proper leadership and necessary firmness with the optimal levels of gentleness and deference.  These days, the great impediment to being a good father and husband is selfishness and carelessness, as we see so commonly in the cultural presentations of oafish, self-serving, uninvolved fathers.  Of course the culture of divorce has a very great deal to do with that.

Even among some traditional priests and laity, however, there seems almost a bias at times against strong leadership which is sometimes slandered as severity, a certain – I am positive it is unintentional – trepidation about fathers going “too far,” or encouragements to fathers towards excessive deference.  There is also sometimes a subtle undermining of the father’s role, in presenting the “ideal” father as meek to the point of emasculated, or gentle to the point of milquetoast.

That does not mean I have not seen very well intentioned Catholic fathers who have perhaps gone a bit too far towards clarity, strength, and decisiveness, which may manifest as a certain tendency towards severity.  As I said, it’s a very difficult balance, but in my limited experience and reading the great mass of deficient fatherhood is on the other side, towards laxity or loss of leadership, both among fathers/husbands who perform their God-given role poorly either due to indifference or lack of knowledge (perhaps more common), and due to the undermining of the father’s/husband’s role by society and, much more destructively, by some of those who should be supporting and upholding that role with all their strength.

This leaves aside the very difficult situation many fathers/husbands face, which is dealing with attempts to usurp their rightful role from within the family itself. This is a very common problem and is found within the most outwardly devout families.  Many women have absorbed some of the noxious ideas floating about in the culture, most of the time unconsciously. Some pious mothers are unaware of how they may be, largely unintentionally, undermining their husband or attempting to subvert his leadership.  Certain priests seem to have a hard time strongly supporting fathers in the face of tearful outbursts in their office or confessional.

All this is to say, the challenges are manifold, especially at this time, though many of these have always existed.  I read a book from a priest written in the 19th century that decried many of these same problems.  Hopefully this prayer will go some way towards overcoming these challenges.  I am looking for a similar prayer intended for mothers and children to aid in their subordinate role in family life, something that is so radically countercultural in these days many have a hard time accepting it.  Generally speaking, in the broader Western world, the overwhelming deficit of virtue and action is on the side of men.  In the much tinier pious Catholic subset, however, the problems are more evenly balanced.

I’ve wandered far enough abroad.  If I keep this up, it’ll be the only post you get today, so I’ll stop.  At root, the best I can do is for all to look to the Holy Family for guidance.  Fathers, look to St. Joseph, mothers, look to Our Lady.  Our Lady never sinned, was preserved free from sin by an act of Grace, and yet she submitted to her husband in all things.  Fathers emulate St. Joseph’s kindness, love, strength, masculinity, and virtue.  I have found you cannot model yourself on St. Joseph, nor ask for his intercession, too much.

 

Two good videos: another holy sermon, and a good Catholic apostolate to support March 2, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, reading, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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First video – I know some of you are aware of Mediatrix Press, but they are producing a whole slew of extremely powerful, edifying titles from some of the greatest Doctors in the history of Holy Mother Church.  Ryan Grant’s project to translate so many of the works of St. Robert Bellarmine into English – which has never before been done – is a huge blessing in and of itself.  But they also have many other great titles, most of which are from long out of print and “forgotten” sources.  An overview of the company below:

I’ve gotten Mediatrix’s translation of Saint Bellarmine’s great treatise on the Antichrist.  It’s excellent.  I look forward to getting the Saint’s autobiography and his catechism.

You can also adopt a book, providing Patreon-type support to help bring books into print.  Check them out!  It is so important to support apostolates like this that do so much to help restore the great Tradition of our faith.  Faith comes by hearing, yes, but also by READING!  I more or less read my way into the Faith, or, more to the point, tradition.  The study of Church history is the process of becoming a Catholic.

At any rate, the other video is a good sermon by that priest so many admire – and rightly so – this time on the subject of being a friend of the cross.  He talks about the need to make holy communions, and to have a lot of intentions when we go to the rail to maximize the benefit of the grace we receive, he speaks of overcoming regret in a positive way, not moping on it or endlessly kicking ourselves over past failings, but using the pain of those failures as a source of motivation, and he speaks of how to pray to gain healing for past wounds – self-inflicted and otherwise.

I’m out of time to give a better description, but it’s a very good sermon.  If you’ve heard many of this priest’s sermons before, some of this may sound familiar, but I think it’s a new and expanded take on the topic (and I’m remembering the days when we had 50+ minute sermons at Mater Dei!  Not anymore, they’re generally much shorter).  Anyway, enjoy: