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Join Father Jason Cargo on Rosary Walks in Richardson March 22, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Dallas Diocese, fun, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, North Deanery, Our Lady, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, thanksgiving, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Continuing a tradition he began a year or two ago while pastor of Immaculate Conception Parish in Corsicana, Fr. Jason Cargo of St. Joseph parish in Richardson is conducting daily Rosary processions in public this Lent in order to evangelize and witness to our glorious Faith, in addition to rendering publicly the honor and glory rightly due to God.  You have to check Father’s Facebook page for the time and location, which varies from day to day as Father seeks to witness to as much of the city as possible.  Starting times and locations for this week are given below:

Thursday 3/23 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Friday 3/24 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Saturday 3/25 at 5:30 pm (Yale Elementary School)
Sunday 3/26 at 4:00 pm (Lookout Park)
Monday 3/27 at 4:30 pm (Ridgecreek Dr. and Bellview Court)
Tuesday 3/28 at 6:00 pm (Sherrill Park Golf Course)
Wednesday 3/29 at 5:30 pm (Ambleside and Pickwick)

YALE ELEMENT. is on Yale and Collins. meet at parking lot that faces Yale Park.

LOOKOUT PARK can be accessed off of Lookout Drive and Plano

Ridgecreek Dr. and Belleview Court is the intersection of two streets. Its in the neighborhood of Windmill stables off of Jupiter.

SHERRIL PARK GOLF COURSE – is accessed off of Lookout and Jupiter

Ambleside and Pickwick – can be accessed off of Renner and Owens

A nice video on the effort was put out by Texas Catholic, the diocesan media platform:

Good Father Cargo.  Rockin’ the cassock and cappa romana.  He is really a good priest.  I pray he is well received at St. Joseph and that his apostolate reach more and more souls.

I am really sorry I did find out about this sooner, as Lent is about half gone.  I suspected Father Cargo would take up this great work of mercy and faith since his reassignment to St. Joseph around Easter last year, but not being on Facebook I missed it until I saw about this on Youtube. That’s the second time today I’ve missed some big news because I’m not on Facebook.  But I’m setting up a reminder to check Father’s Facebook, which I can do without rejoining, next week to help get the word out.

If you have time and live or work in the Richardson/North Dallas area, consider joining Father on one of his “walks.”  They usually take about 45 minutes and cover 1 1/2 miles, praying all 15 decades of the Rosary.

I really like this kind of effort and it makes me feel rather ashamed I’ve let the prayer vigils outside strip clubs lapse.  As Father Cargo says, we never know what fruit giving such public witness of our Faith will yield – not only for those on the outside, but also for ourselves.  I pray that more priests take the time to do such good works.  Father Cargo is pastor of a huge parish but he is still prioritizing these efforts at evangelization.  May God bless him and all those who participate abundantly.

And please pray for him!  Our good priests are always especially under attack, from both the world and the devil and the fallen angels.  Pray Father is able to do all that good he wants to do, which is substantial.  He was very generous with me in something I was trying to do at one time and I shall not forget that.  Deo Gratias!

Image from Father’s Facebook, I pray he doesn’t mind.

Prayer for Self Control March 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, mortification, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Continuing in this impromptu Lenten series of prayers for establishing a holy and virtuous home life, a prayer/meditation on maintaining self-control at all times.

I am definitely of a quick tempered disposition.  I inherited many things from my father’s side of the family, many very admirable attributes, but this is probably one that is on the debit side.  My paternal grandmother said her father-in-law, my great-grandfather, was the meanest man she ever met.  My dad had a really hard time with his father, who was an extremely hard worker but also extremely demanding. I believe, Deo Gratias, there has been a certain process of mellowing from one generation to the next, but the tendency towards a quick temper – which subsides as quickly as it comes on – has remained.  Also, both my grandfather (lifelong farmer) and father (farm raised/construction/gas fields) were notorious abusers of the language, using foul words as a matter of course, and that’s been another bad habit I’ve struggled against.

That is to say, this prayer from Father’s Manual by Fr. A Coomes, SJ, is something I can really appreciate.  It would be ideal, I guess, if readers could say “this is definitely not a problem for me!,” but I tend to doubt that’s the case.  Note, tendency towards excessive anger is not the only area of self-control addressed, but in raising a whole bunch of kids, it is often among the most prevalent:

Lord Jesus, You told us to learn of  You because You are meek and humble of heart. Teach me Your way of meekness that I may control my mind, my heart, and my tongue.

Give me the manly calm and self-control needed to be an example and inspiration to my family.

Help me to be a considerate husband – to be a true comfort to my wife……..and never quarreling or peevish.  May I be at all times sympathetic, and may my words never be bitter to bring her sorrow.  May I always be understanding, unselfish, and thoughtful in sharing with her the family problems we experience.  Let me be ready to conciliate differences with understanding and never be domineering.

Teach me to be a patient father to my children, inspiring them always by word and example.  May my words always be words that direct and help them, and never words that wound.  When I must correct them, let it not be in anger. And, if I must be firm in my corrections, let me never be crude or harsh.

Let me never use rude or impatient words before my wife and children, nor display an uncontrolled or ill-considered action, which must certainly be a reproach to me afterwards when I contemplate the gentleness and calm of your meek and humble heart.

Finally create in me a spirit of true familial leadership, where I embody all the virtues necessary in a father, husband, and head of the domestic church entrusted to my care.  May I display none of the vices of selfishness, pride, indifference, or failure of leadership. May I in all things lead my family according to Your holy will, for which I will be judged most severely at my death.  May my wife and children submit to my role as leader of the family entrusted to me with willingness and humility.

Please bless our family abundantly and provide us with a joyful and happy Christian home.

———End Quote———

It is a great challenge, adequately balancing proper leadership and necessary firmness with the optimal levels of gentleness and deference.  These days, the great impediment to being a good father and husband is selfishness and carelessness, as we see so commonly in the cultural presentations of oafish, self-serving, uninvolved fathers.  Of course the culture of divorce has a very great deal to do with that.

Even among some traditional priests and laity, however, there seems almost a bias at times against strong leadership which is sometimes slandered as severity, a certain – I am positive it is unintentional – trepidation about fathers going “too far,” or encouragements to fathers towards excessive deference.  There is also sometimes a subtle undermining of the father’s role, in presenting the “ideal” father as meek to the point of emasculated, or gentle to the point of milquetoast.

That does not mean I have not seen very well intentioned Catholic fathers who have perhaps gone a bit too far towards clarity, strength, and decisiveness, which may manifest as a certain tendency towards severity.  As I said, it’s a very difficult balance, but in my limited experience and reading the great mass of deficient fatherhood is on the other side, towards laxity or loss of leadership, both among fathers/husbands who perform their God-given role poorly either due to indifference or lack of knowledge (perhaps more common), and due to the undermining of the father’s/husband’s role by society and, much more destructively, by some of those who should be supporting and upholding that role with all their strength.

This leaves aside the very difficult situation many fathers/husbands face, which is dealing with attempts to usurp their rightful role from within the family itself. This is a very common problem and is found within the most outwardly devout families.  Many women have absorbed some of the noxious ideas floating about in the culture, most of the time unconsciously. Some pious mothers are unaware of how they may be, largely unintentionally, undermining their husband or attempting to subvert his leadership.  Certain priests seem to have a hard time strongly supporting fathers in the face of tearful outbursts in their office or confessional.

All this is to say, the challenges are manifold, especially at this time, though many of these have always existed.  I read a book from a priest written in the 19th century that decried many of these same problems.  Hopefully this prayer will go some way towards overcoming these challenges.  I am looking for a similar prayer intended for mothers and children to aid in their subordinate role in family life, something that is so radically countercultural in these days many have a hard time accepting it.  Generally speaking, in the broader Western world, the overwhelming deficit of virtue and action is on the side of men.  In the much tinier pious Catholic subset, however, the problems are more evenly balanced.

I’ve wandered far enough abroad.  If I keep this up, it’ll be the only post you get today, so I’ll stop.  At root, the best I can do is for all to look to the Holy Family for guidance.  Fathers, look to St. Joseph, mothers, look to Our Lady.  Our Lady never sinned, was preserved free from sin by an act of Grace, and yet she submitted to her husband in all things.  Fathers emulate St. Joseph’s kindness, love, strength, masculinity, and virtue.  I have found you cannot model yourself on St. Joseph, nor ask for his intercession, too much.

 

Two good videos: another holy sermon, and a good Catholic apostolate to support March 2, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, reading, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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First video – I know some of you are aware of Mediatrix Press, but they are producing a whole slew of extremely powerful, edifying titles from some of the greatest Doctors in the history of Holy Mother Church.  Ryan Grant’s project to translate so many of the works of St. Robert Bellarmine into English – which has never before been done – is a huge blessing in and of itself.  But they also have many other great titles, most of which are from long out of print and “forgotten” sources.  An overview of the company below:

I’ve gotten Mediatrix’s translation of Saint Bellarmine’s great treatise on the Antichrist.  It’s excellent.  I look forward to getting the Saint’s autobiography and his catechism.

You can also adopt a book, providing Patreon-type support to help bring books into print.  Check them out!  It is so important to support apostolates like this that do so much to help restore the great Tradition of our faith.  Faith comes by hearing, yes, but also by READING!  I more or less read my way into the Faith, or, more to the point, tradition.  The study of Church history is the process of becoming a Catholic.

At any rate, the other video is a good sermon by that priest so many admire – and rightly so – this time on the subject of being a friend of the cross.  He talks about the need to make holy communions, and to have a lot of intentions when we go to the rail to maximize the benefit of the grace we receive, he speaks of overcoming regret in a positive way, not moping on it or endlessly kicking ourselves over past failings, but using the pain of those failures as a source of motivation, and he speaks of how to pray to gain healing for past wounds – self-inflicted and otherwise.

I’m out of time to give a better description, but it’s a very good sermon.  If you’ve heard many of this priest’s sermons before, some of this may sound familiar, but I think it’s a new and expanded take on the topic (and I’m remembering the days when we had 50+ minute sermons at Mater Dei!  Not anymore, they’re generally much shorter).  Anyway, enjoy:

Prayer for the Grace of Fatherly Wisdom and Responsibility February 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, mortification, Restoration, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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From a nice little prayer book my wife gave me – no hint there, I’m sure! – called, simply, Father’s Manual.  There is much good advice in this book, which is presented in the form of prayers one may offer up to be a good, wise, just, and holy father.

So many men today who are having children of their own had either only a weak or no good fatherly guide on which to model their own behavior as father and head of the domestic church.  Even those who had good fathers in their lives swim in a cultural sewer that inculcates perverse ideas regarding fathers and fatherhood on a constant basis.  These prayers, then, can be very helpful for men who are struggling in the roles to which they will be held to a strict accounting at their particular judgment.  Even for those who are very solid in their roles as father, I hope some of these will be helpful reminders.  The excerpt below is on praying for the Grace of fatherly wisdom and responsibility, pp. 22-26:

Heavenly Father, in establishing the family, you have decreed that the child should have a need for both father and mother – and have made each of them, as parents, responsible to you for the souls of their children, which have been created to your very image and likeness.

So, as a father, I must realize that I shall give a severe account to you for any laziness or indifference in the fulfilment of my office.

Bring me to be a good father to my children.

Let me never be a slacker in the sacred trust which I have accepted from your hands.

It is not permitted me, I know, to push off on my wife the obligation of parental control; I have my own part of this burden and a responsibility.  So may I always accept my share of the parents’ duty and carry it out prayerfully and dependably.

Your plan for the family and its needs makes it plain that the fact that I work all day to provide our material living does not permit me to remain aloof from the problems of rearing the children and directing them.  Let me always realize deeply that my calling to be a parent is a full-time job, which admits of no vacation.

May I prayerfully strive to work harmoniously with my wife in all things pertaining to discipline in the home – discussing matters privately with her and working them out cooperatively.  And my I never bicker with her or argue before my children, especially in matters of family policy or discipline.

May the consideration I show my wife deepen my children’s love for her as their mother.

Let the correction I give my children be quiet and fatherly, yet firm – and may it always be the fruit of prayer.

Let me realize deeply my obligation of being a companion to my children, sharing their interests and enthusiasms, guiding them, counseling them, encouraging them.

And in the corrections that I must administer, may my children be able to to look to me and see in my life an example of everything that, as a father, I require of them.

Let them see in me a fitting example of truthfulness at all times, of honesty in dealing with them and with my fellow man, of reverence for God in all I say and do, of dignity, always, in my speech, which should never be such that I may not approve the same words in them.  But rather in all things may I teach first by actions what I must require of my children by fatherly command.

Teach me, heavenly Father, to model my thinking and willing and acting after your own all-wise fatherhood and thus may I return responsibly and reverently to you the souls of the children you have entrusted to me.

———–End Quote———–

I should add, while the above was certainly tailored specifically for fathers, mothers could certainly derive great fruit from such prayers/meditations, with suitable changes.  The unique role of the father, however, has been often even more under threat in our culture than has that of the mother, or at least some strange derivative of what was traditionally associated with motherhood.  Then again, men aren’t as frequently sold a horrific pack of lies asserting that killing one’s own offspring is the way to personal empowerment.  So perhaps the threats are a bit differently orientated, but of the same magnitude for both mothers and fathers.

I pray you find this useful and/or edifying!

Did an American Hermit Predict Donald Trump Would Lead a Great Spiritual Revival in the US? February 22, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in fun, General Catholic, huh?, priests, Restoration, Society, the struggle for the Church.
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I haven’t much time, but was sent this yesterday by reader D.  I’ve never heard of the priest before.  He claims, through rather providential circumstances, to have met at American hermit living in Loreto many years ago, a man who predicted decades before last year’s election that Donald J. Trump would lead a great spiritual or religious revival in this nation.  Take it for what you will, it’s certainly interesting, to say the least:

Look, I am grateful to have Trump.  Anybody but Hillary.  And he’s done some pretty good things so far, along with a few not so good ones, like letting the “Dream Act” illegals remain, apparently.  His undermining of the self-serving elitist uniparty of indifference and self-enrichment is a great achievement in itself.  But I do think people sometimes have exaggerated expectations for the man.  He’s never been particularly devout or Christian.  His personal morality is uninspiring, to say the least. So, I’m a bit doubtful about the great 21st century American Catholic Restoration being inspired by this man, but there is certainly nothing wrong in maintaining a pious hope that such may occur.  Lord knows, we need it.

I’m out for the day.  It always happens like this, I have a proverbial ton of great material for the blog and no time to share it!  Perhaps God may will that I may have more time tomorrow.  I tried to get a few things out today.

Start 90 Day Special Devotion for Fatima Apparition TODAY (02/13/17) February 13, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Holy suffering, Interior Life, Latin Mass, mortification, Novenas, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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This special Novena was put together by Fr. Richard Heilman of the Diocese of Madison, WI.  This is a 90 day Novena running from the start of Septuagesima to May 13, the 100th anniversary of the first apparition of Our Lady of Fatima.  Fr. Heilman has set up a special website for this effort (Nineveh 90), but, unfortunately, it seems to be down right now, at least for me.  However, much of the same content has gone up on his blog.  I’ll let Father explain the purpose of this special 90 day effort of prayer and mortification, which runs through Septuagesima and Lent and on into Easter:

Nineveh 90 – the 90 days from February 13 to May 13 – is inspired by the excellent program – Exodus 90 – designed exclusively for men by Fr. Brian Doerr and others. I strongly encourage men to sign-up for Exodus 90 (sign-up HERE), and use it for our 90-day journey.

For our Nineveh 90 journey, which includes both men and women, we are embracing the great values of mortification, a support system, and the research in the behavioral sciences that says 90 days is about the time needed to change bad habits. We will also be using some of the tried and true supernatural elements. Namely, the Brown Scapular, 54 Day Rosary Novena, and the 33 Day Preparation for Marian Consecration.

THE NINEVEH 90 CHALLENGE BEGINS FEBRUARY 13

“Consecration Day” will be on May 13, the 100th Anniversary of Our Lady of Fatima.

Nineveh 90 – Ten Elements

  1. For these 90 days, resolve to let go of repetitive sin you struggle with (e.g., masturbation, over-eating, alcohol, etc.)
  2. Wear Brown Scapular (Scapular Medal allowed) – Akin to Sackcloth
  3. Daily Mass (This is more of an encouragement, as many cannot do this)
  4. Confession (at least once a month … immediately following grave sin)
  5. Support System: Create or join a “Nineveh 90 Squad” of 3-8 people. Meet 1-3 times per week (in person or online). Join together with an “Accountability Buddy.” Meet daily or, at least, 3 times a week.  [That’s……..really frequent.  I don’t have a problem with having some accountability but I think this might be a bit aggressive for busy families]
  6. Daily Prayer
    • Morning Offering
    • Angelus (6,Noon,6)
    • Rosary
    • Holy Hour (or at least 20 minutes)
    • Bedtime Prayers
  7. For 90 Days, Commit to …
    • Regular and intense exercise (this may be one of the greater challenges for many)
    • Seven hours of sleep is essential
    • No alcohol
    • No desserts & sweets
    • No eating between meals
    • No soda or sweetened drinks
    • No television or movies (news allowed)
    • Only music that lifts the soul to God
    • No televised sports (one per week allowed)
    • Limit recreational computer time (only use for personal needs and fulfillment. May be needed for Nineveh 90 too)
  8. 54 Day Rosary Novena (Basic Training in Holiness) – February 13 to April 7
  9. 33 Day Preparation for Consecration – April 10 (Monday of Holy Week) to May 12
  10. Marian Consecration – May 13, 2017. 100th Anniversary of Our Lady of Fatima

Prayer Intention for 54 Day Rosary Novena: Personal Holiness and for the Roman Catholic Church.

Sundays and Solemnities: may be a day of relaxed discipline, but not abandoned. (Sleep in an extra hour, cream in your coffee, a dessert, a beer, etc.)

Fasting: Wednesdays and Fridays (Water/Juice and bread only, if medically allowed, otherwise as is outlined by the USCCB)

Father Heilman claims 10,000!! have signed up to take part in this.  That’s some serious penance and prayer going on.  I didn’t officially sign up but plan on joining my wife in doing most all of the above.  Internet will be hard, along with the 2 days of old school fasting.  I will try one and see how it goes.  I’m soft, I know.  Actually in the past I’ve let myself do more “positive” penances – go and do a bunch of extra things, do good works, etc! – rather than “negative” ones in taking things away, though I’ve done my share of that, too, especially relative to the comfy chair Church of today.

Intentions behind this effort, apart from desperately needed personal sanctification, are the restoration of the Faith and the overcoming of the many threats which seem to be coming together in this most significant of years, 2017.  Join in these prayers and penances (many of which I know most of you already perform regularly, or would as part of Septuagesima and Lent) to offer up graces for the conversion of Church leadership and the reinstitution of sanity and piety at all levels of the Church.

I do know some may have concerns about continuing hard penances beyond Lent and into Easter.  I, too, have some trepidation over that, especially during the Octave itself, when every day is a literal continuation of the greatest, most glorious solemnity in the Church.  I think those who are troubled at the prospect of rigorous penance and self-denial during this holiest, most joyful season of the year could substitute more positive acts or switch over to more prayer and less penance.  This is perhaps something to review with your particular confessor/spiritual director as the time nears.  For now, all the activities listed above are eminently suited for Septuagesima and Lent and I highly encourage your partaking in them.

I may try to run the penance during Easter bit past Fr. Rodriguez to see what he counsels.  I’ll report back anything I learn.

 

Announcement Post: Two Upcoming Events of Interest February 2, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Abortion, catachesis, contraception, Dallas Diocese, Eucharist, General Catholic, Latin Mass, Restoration, sexual depravity, sickness, Society, Tradition, Virtue.
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The Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation will be presenting a series of talks at Mater Dei Latin Mass Parish in Irving on Feb. 18-19.  I am not certain if the director of the Center, Mr. Hugh Owen, is giving the talks or not.  Details are below:

All are invited to attend a seminar presented by the Kolbe Center for the Study of Creation on Creation and Evolution.

This will be a six part presentation on the philosophy, theology, and science behind creation and evolution.

 

The seminar is free, but a free will offering will be taken up to help cover the cost of this event.

 

Dinner will be served at 5pm on Saturday with a

suggested donation of $5 for adults; $2-3 per child.

Where: Mater Dei Parish Hall

When: (part 1) Saturday, Feb. 18th: 5-8/9pm

            (part 2) Sunday,  Feb. 19th: 2-5pm

BTW, in addition to overnight Adoration (TLM at 8p, Adoration starts after, ends before 8a Mass on Saturday) on the FIRST FRIDAY of each month, Mater Dei is experimenting with having Adoration from 1-5p on every Friday.  If attendance is sufficient to insure the Blessed Sacrament is never left unattended, it will become a regular thing.

The other upcoming local event is a series of protests to de-fund Planned Baby-Butchery at a couple of locations in the Diocese, to be held from 9-11a at Feb 11.  The principle one, to me, is at the baby-murder super center in South Dallas:

Dallas

Planned Parenthood – South Dallas Surgical Health Services Center
7989 W Virginia Dr, Dallas, TX 75237 (Map & Directions)
Time: 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. on February 11

The other protest is in Plano:

Plano

Planned Parenthood – Plano Health Center
600 N Central Expy, Plano, TX 75074 (Map & Directions)
Time: 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on February 11
Note: This event will consist of a prayer vigil. Street parking is available next to Fry’s Electronics on Executive Drive.

I plan to be at the protest in South Dallas.  Maybe I will see some of you there.

St. Francis de Sales on Dealing with the Sins of Others February 1, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, reading, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Another excerpt from Finding God’s Will for You, a collection of letters sent by the great Doctor of the Church over the course of his exceptional apostolate.  This one deals with how to deal with the sins of others, and not falling into despair because we can’t “save” all we would like to see saved.  From pp. 102-5:

God has supreme hatred for sin, and yet He most wisely permits it.  This is to allow rational creatures to act according to their natural condition; it is also to render the good more worthy of commendation when they do not violate the law, even though they are able to violate it.  Let us therefore adore and bless this holy permission.  [I have heard priests describe the gift of free will as “strange,” even hard or cruel, because why didn’t God just create everyone as mindless followers of His Will and thus to be saved.  St. Francis informs us as to why:  because He didn’t, we should not have been made in His image if we did not have free will, and because he wanted us to freely choose Him and His Love from among all the enticements and pleasures of the flesh.]images-3

However, since the same Providence that permits sin has infinite hatred for it, let us together with Providence detest and hate it, desiring with all our power that sin permitted may never become sin committed.  As a result of this desire, let us use all possible remedies to prevent the birth, growth, and domination of sin.  In this let us imitate our Lord, who never ceases to exhort, promise, threaten, prohibit, command, and inspire us in order to turn our will away from sin as far as possible without depriving us of liberty.

But when a sin has been committed, we must do all in our power to have it wiped away.  We should be like our Lord, who assured Carpus, as has already been noted, that if it were needful, He would submit to death a second time in order to deliver a single soul from sin.  But if the sinner is obstinate…..in company with the Savior of our souls, let us weep, sigh, and pray for him………

……Meanwhile, no matter how obstinate sinners may be, we must never lose courage in aiding and serving them.  How do we know whether perhaps they will do penance and be saved?  Happy is he who, like St. Paul, can say to his neighbor, “day and night I did not cease with tears to admonish every one of you.  Therefore I am innocent of the blood of all, for i have not shrunk from declaring to you the whole counsel of God.”  As long as we are within the limits of hope that the sinner can amend, and they are always of the same extent as those of his life, we must never reject him, but rather pray for him and help him as far as his misfortune will permit. [Thus, many of our corrections and blandishments of those many lost in sin and error in the Church must continue, so long as there is hope that they may repent.]

But at the very end, after we have wept over the obstinate and have rendered them our duty in charity of trying to reclaim them from perdition, we must imitate our Lord and the apostles.  That is, we must turn our mind from them and place it on other objects and tasks more useful to God’s glory.  “It was necessary that the word of God should be first spoken to you,” said the Apostles to the Jews, “but since you reject it and judge yourselves unworthy,” of the Kingdom of Jesus Christ, “behold, we turn to the Gentiles.” [A true and hard saying, but one that must be borne in mind.  There are many fields for the spread of the Gospel, if not turns out to be sterile, we must move onto another.  That is incredibly sad, especially when it involves someone we love, but if we tried and prayed and wept for years over loved ones no progress, our efforts may be put to better use elsewhere.]

“The Kingdom of God,” says the Savior, “shall be taken from you and shall be given to a nation yielding its fruits.”  We cannot spend too much time weeping over some men without losing time suitable and necessary to procure the download-16salvation of others.  True, the Apostle says that he has a “continuous sorrow” over the loss of the Jews, but this is the same as when we say that we bless God at all times, which  means simply that we bless Him very frequently and on every occasion.  In the same manner, the glorious St. Paul has a continuous sorrow in his heart because of the reprobation of the Jews, since on every occasion he lamented their misfortune.

For the rest, we must always adore, love, and praise God’s avenging and punitive justice, just as we love His mercy, since both are daughters of His goodness. [Well now, isn’t that contrary to the church of infinite mercy and zero justice we hear preached today.  In point of fact, mercy cannot be separated from justice.  If it is, it becomes mere weakness and sentimentality.  Those who wish to replace justice with a false sense of mercy will get neither, but will only gather a harvest of rank indifference and moral decline – which may well be what the purveyors of the church of infinite mercy want in the end, anyway] By His Grace, He wills to make us good, for He is good, yes, supremely good. By his justice, He wills to punish sin because He hates it, and He hates it because, being supremely good, He hates that supreme evil which is iniquity.

In conclusion, note that God never withdraws His mercy from us except by the most equitable vengeance of His punitive justice, and that we never escape the rigor of His justice except by His justifying mercy.  Always, whether He punishes  or gives grace, His good pleasure is worthy of adoration, love, and everlasting blessing. Always, whether He punishes or gives grace, His good pleasure is worthy of adoration, love, and everlasting blessing.  Hence, “the just man” who sings the praises of God’s mercy over such as shall be saved likewise “shall rejoice when he shall see vengeance.”  With joy the blessed shall approve the judgment of damnation passed on the reprobate as well as that of salvation on the elect.

Since the angels have exercised their charity toward the men they had in their keeping, they shall remain in peace when they see them obstinate or even damned.  Therefore, we must acquiesce in God’s will and kiss the right hand of His mercy and the left hand of His justice with equal tenderness and reverence.

———–End Quote———–

Now this is a Francis I can really get behind.  Too bad there aren’t more like him around these days.

Start Novena for Our Lady of Lourdes Tomorrow Feb 2! February 1, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Novenas, Our Lady, Restoration, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Start Novena to Our Lady of Lourdes tomorrow, Feb 2.  She Is The Immaculate Conception!

O ever Immaculate Virgin, Mother of Mercy, Health of the Sick, Refuge of Sinners, Comfort to the Afflicted,

you know my wants, my troubles, my sufferings. Deign to cast upon me a look of mercy. By appearing in the Grotto of Lourdes, you were pleased to make it  a privileged sanctuary, whence you dispense your favors; and already many sufferers have obtained the cure of their infirmities, both spiritual and corporal. 

 I come, therefore, with the most unbounded confidence to implore your maternal intercession. Obtain,  O loving Mother, the granting of my requests.  (mention your intentions here)

Through gratitude for favors, I will endeavor to imitate your virtues that I may one day share your glory.

Our Lady of Lourdes, pray for us. Amen.

(Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be.)

Another nice accompanying prayer:

Two prayers to prepare the universal celebration of Our Lady of Lourdes, on February 11

Mary, you showed yourself to BernadetteLOURDESMARY_BERNA4inchcopy1
in the crevice of the rock.
In the cold and grey of winter,
you brought the warmth, light and beauty
of your presence,

In the often obscure depths of our lives,
in the depth of the world where evil is so powerful,
bring hope,
return our confidence!

You are the Immaculate Conception,
come to our aid, sinners that we are.474718093_70c533b5f9
Give us the humility to have a change of heart,
the courage to do penance.
Teach us to pray for all people.

Guide us to the source of true life.
Make us pilgrims going forward with your Church,
whet our appetite for the Eucharist,
the bread for the journey, the bread of life.

The Spirit brought about wonders in you, O Mary :
by his power, he has placed you near the Father,
in the glory of your eternal Son.
Look with kindness
on our miserable bodies and hearts.
Shine forth for us, like a gentle light,
at the hour of our death.

Together with Bernadette, we pray to you, O Mary,
as your poor children.glory4
May we enter, like her, into the spirit of the Beatitudes.
Then, we will be able, here below,
begin to know the joy of the Kingdom of Heaven
and sing together with you :
Magnificent !

Glory to you, Virgin Mary,
blessed servant of the Lord,
Mother of God,
dwelling place of the Holy Spirit!

Amen.

SSPX Close to Reconciliation with Rome – Wonderful, Yes, But Is This the Right Time? January 30, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, different religion, disconcerting, episcopate, Francis, General Catholic, Latin Mass, priests, Restoration, SSPX, the struggle for the Church, Tradition.
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There have been growing pronouncements from both the Vatican and the SSPX leadership that the two camps – if that is the right term – appear close to a formal accord regularizing the SSPX’s canonical situation.  Just today, the Secretary of the Ecclesia Dei Commission, Archbishop Guido Pozzo, said full communion is near:

We are working at this moment in the completion of some aspects of the canonical frame, which will be the Personal Prelature.” Archbishop Guido Pozzo, Secretary of the Ecclesia Dei commission, charged with dialogue with the Society of Saint Pius X, confirms [SSPX Superior-General Fellay’s words] to Vatican Insider that the stage of full communion with the Lefebvrians is near. The accomplishment of the agreement is now in plain sight, even if some time is still needed

I am of two minds over this: I have prayed for this for years, and there would be tremendous potential for great benefit to the Church by this successful regularization.  However, I am exceedingly troubled that it is occurring during this most perilous of pontificates. Outbreaks of persecution against Tradition seem to be growing around the Church.    More and more regions are implementing Amoris Laetitia, and thus radically changing both public belief and practice, along the lines of Francis’ own interpretation of that document.  This means a crisis over doctrine appears to be inevitable.  While it would be wonderful to have the SSPX back in full, regular canonical status and thus adding a great voice to the defense of the Faith (not that they are not already doing this), I have great trepidation for the future.

I am curious what people affiliated with the Society think about this.  I am an outsider looking in, but I do have a great deal of interest in this matter, as I am convinced that there will be strong impact on the Ecclesia Dei groups no matter how SSPX “reconciliation” turns out.  Is there an element of regularization at any price in this?  Is this the pontificate under which it would really be optimal, even sensical, for regularization to take place?  What happened in Campos?  Was the SSPX-SO critique basically accurate, then?

What will the impact be to the Ecclesia Dei communities?  Once the SSPX is regularized, a major reason for their existence would seem to have been removed.  If Summorum Pontificum is truly under threat, as many feel, is it beyond reason to envision a perfect storm settling not only on  the availability of the TLM but on the entire traditional movement?  After the rape of the Knights of Malta and the crushing of the Franciscans of the Immaculate, is the risk in moving at this time warranted?

The question is not whether this is desirable.  Of course it is.  The question is whether this is wise now, with this pontificate, with this most underhanded and authoritarian of men wielding ultimate power in the Church?  Bishop Fellay and some of his close associates maintain that if there is any kind of double-cross, the SSPX can simply return to their current status.  Perhaps.  But that entire structure required a very unique personality (Archbishop Lefebvre) and a very particular series of events to evolve to the current status quo.  I am not entirely certain the personalities and the potentialities would be prevalent for a repeat.  In fact I tend to think they simply will not –after all, +Lefebvre did not set out to wind up in a canonically irregular status when he founded his seminary for training priests back around 1970.  He wanted to remain within the structure of the Church, but was forced by conscience, circumstance, and frequent bungling, even ill-will, on the part of Church authorities to arrive at the destination arrived in 1988.  That is, my read on this whole history was, none of it was premeditated, the arrival at a canonically irregular position was achieved by circumstance.  But to leave after regularization would mean to premeditatedly return to irregularity (or whatever one wants to call it).

Plus, moral surrenders – if this be one, and I’m not certain that it would be, but it has potential to be one – are (humanly) impossible to recover from.

I am more or less convinced that should this regularization take place, there will be no going back, for good or for ill.  I also badly fear the example of the sons of Bishop Castro-Mayer in the Diocese of Campos, Brazil.  Many feel a near total capitulation to the post-conciliar ethos has transpired in that odd subset of a diocese.

Again, I’m especially interested to learn what people with a close association with the SSPX are thinking, but all comments are welcome on this most complex of topics.