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Cool idea, or going a bit far? Diocese of Lafayette rolls out mobile confessional December 1, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, episcopate, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, priests, Sacraments, Society, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.

Reader D sent this to me.  The Diocese of Lafayette, under the leadership of Bishop Charles Jarrell, who has taken one of the strongest stands against the enormous evil of Supreme Court imposition of pseudo-sodo-marriage of any US prelate, has rolled out a converted ambulance as a mobile confessional (annoying auto video play at link).  I’m all for making the great and underused Sacrament of Confession much more available.  I think this idea has some merit in theory, but I have to wonder if this will not come off as a bit gimmicky?  What do you think?

The Lafayette Diocese has created a new and easier way for outreach with the Catholic Church.

They’ve converted an old ambulance into a mobile confessional called a spiritual care unit. With a  picture of Jesus and Bible verses on the side, the new unit is for spiritual emergencies, specifically remodeled for prayer and confessions.

“It’s a way that we can give some pride and public expression of our Catholic faith that is not just meant for the walls of the church, but on the streets,” Father Michael Champagne, a priest at Lafayette Diocese, said. [OK.  I can see that. There may be some merit.  BTW, Fr. Champagne wears a cassock.]

The unit is  part of Pope Francis’ Year of Mercy that begins on December 8. Thanks to an anonymous donation, it took two weeks to complete the unit that Champagne calls a church on wheels. 

“We need to go to where people are. People come to the church as a center of worship and pray, but we also have to do outreach,” Champagne said.  [I’m warming to the concept.]

Not only is the vehicle a way to bring more people to the Catholic church, but it makes going to confession easier for people with busy schedules.

“Pope Francis is asking us to go out of to the peripheries of the church and now we have the means to do that,” Bishop Michael Jarrell said. [Almost a bit cheeky, but this is a response to the Year of Mercy I could get behind, so long as the Sacrament is not cheapened in any way.  Making Confession more available is to me such a huge necessity.  I think it should normally be accomplished by vastly increasing the hours priests are available for Confession (like, 2 or so every day, minimum!) and by priests and bishops stressing the great importance of this Sacrament in sermons and other efforts throughout the year.  But a mobile confessional is far from the worse expression of mercy we’ll see in the coming year, I imagine]

Inside the unit there are Bibles, rosaries and even holy water. It’s fully equipped to spiritually care for others.

“There’s no sin in the world that’s too big for God’s mercy,” Champagne said. “We want to extend and preach the gospel of mercy to our people.”

The spiritual care unit will make stops around Acadiana beginning on December 8, for the beginning for the holy year of mercy. 

And as a relatively large diocese with a widely dispersed rural population, and surely a paucity of priests as everywhere, this is not a bad way to get folks into the confessional.  Overall, I think this is a good idea, and a way of implementing the upcoming Year of Mercy that stresses the traditional, sacramental practice of the Faith while also going out to those peripheries.  I wouldn’t mind seeing a few of those roll in the Diocese of Dallas!  Just about anything that gets souls into the confessional, that great locus of conversion and true application of mercy (and not the false mercy of the world and the worldlings in collar), is something I can get behind.

Good job Bishop Jarrell. Pretty neat idea.  I’m interested to see if it really gets used a lot and does get more souls into the confessional.

Threat brewing to TLM from liberal episcopal conferences? November 30, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, different religion, disaster, Ecumenism, episcopate, error, foolishness, General Catholic, Latin Mass, Liturgy, persecution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sexual depravity, sickness, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition.

Not the usual threat – pretending the TLM is some kind of forbidden act, like the “lambada” – but attempting to inflict the post-conciliar reform on the TLM in the form of the death of a thousand cuts.

That’s one possible interpretation – in addition to the overtones of ecumania – to the request/demand of the episcopal conference of England and Wales that the language of the TLM be changed again with regard to the prayers of the conversion of the Jews in the Good Friday intercessory prayers.  Those prayers form part of the Mass of the Presanctified.  So this could be more ecumenism gone wild……or could it be something more?

The Catholic bishops of England and Wales have issued a public request [public] that the Vatican change the prayer for the Jews said on Good Friday in the Extraordinary Form liturgy.

The prayer, composed by Pope Benedict XVI in 2008, asks God to illumine the hearts of the Jewish people “that they acknowledge Jesus Christ as the Savior of all men.” [You can see why I rarely quote Catholic Culture anymore. They are not speaking accurately or fairly here. Did the TLM just fall from the sky in 2008?  Was it invented by Pope Benedict?  So what really happened in 2008?  Was it not that Benedict caved to heavy pressure from within and outside the Church to edit the ancient prayers imploring conversion of the Jews because they used supposedly “harsh” terms like “blindness of that people” and “take away the veil of their hearts,” which for 1000 years or more had been known as charitable pastoral concern, not anti-Jew bigotry?]  

Archbishop Kevin McDonald, who chairs the British bishops’ committee for relations with Jews, said that the prayer has “caused great confusion and upset” among Jews. The bishops of England and Wales said that the prayer should be revised to reflect the understanding of relations between Catholics and Jews that is set forth in the Vatican II document Nostra Aetate.

What tosh.  Let me translate for you: the TLM throughout conveys ideas and expresses very clear beliefs that are irreconcilable with much post-conciliar belief and practice.  The two can at best only warily coexist.  The modification of the the TLM statements having to do with the Jews is just one very small area where the post-conciliar Church That Is would like to force the Church That Was -as represented by the TLM – into accepting the new order.  Benedict’s wording in 2008 was a somewhat skillful compromise that minimized the actual damage while setting a disastrous precedent (verified by the actions of the English episcopal conference).  We can see that the editing that has occurred so far has not satisfied the demands of the ecumaniacs and other progressives.

So is this just a special case of a certain excess of concern towards the opinions of the Jews regarding our 2000 year old sacred worship (I note the Church is not permitted to make similar criticisms of Jewish practice), or is it a sign of a general effort – perhaps in its most nascent stages – to neuter the TLM and render it more acceptable to the post-conciliar ethos and reigning secular pagan zeitgeist?  The evidence to date points to the former, but the known intent of the revolutionaries in the Church screams the latter.

If you want your TLM, you may have to fight to keep it.

Note, I haven’t even addressed the profound lack of supernatural charity exhibited by this constant kow-towing to the Jews (and other religions) by Church leaders.  Their lack of faith is as amazing as it is apparent, and is the only explanation for their apparent contempt for the eternal destiny of millions of souls in a fallen and obsolete religion – rendered obsolete by the direct act of God, and the Jews continuing refusal to accept the most direct Divine revelation in the history of the world.

Novena Reminders – Immaculate Conception and St. Andrew Novenas November 30, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Novenas, Our Lady, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, Virtue.
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The 25 day St. Andrew Novena starts today, Nov. 30.  The prayer is as follows, pray it 15 times a day through Christmas Eve:




I typically just make an en bloc petition for the day for all 15 recitations. If you say them all together, it only takes a few minutes.


The Immaculate Conception Novena should have normally begun yesterday, but you could begin it today and finish on Dec. 8:

O most pure Virgin Mary conceived without sin, from the very  first instant, you were entirely immaculate. O glorious Mary full of grace, you  are the mother of my God – the Queen of Angels and of men. I humbly venerate you  as the chosen mother of my Savior, Jesus Christ.

The Prince of Peace and the Lord of Lords chose you for the  singular grace and honor of being His beloved mother. By the power of His Cross,  He preserved you from all sin. Therefore, by His power and love, I have hope and  bold confidence in your prayers for my holiness and salvation.

I pray first of all that you would make me worthy to call you  my mother and your Son, Jesus, my Lord.

I pray that your prayers will bring me to imitate your  holiness and submission to Jesus and the Divine Will.

Hail Mary, full of Grace, the Lord is with you. Blessed are  you among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother  of God, pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death.

Now, Queen of Heaven, I beg you to beg my Savior to grant me  these requests…

(Mention your  intentions)

My holy Mother, I know that you were obedient to the will of  God. In making this petition, I know that God’s will is more perfect than mine.  So, grant that I may receive God’s grace with humility like you.

As my final request, I ask that you pray for me to increase in  faith in our risen Lord; I ask that you pray for me to increase in hope in our  risen Lord; I ask that you pray for me to increase in love for the risen  Jesus!

Hail Mary, full of Grace, the Lord is with you. Blessed are  you among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother  of God, pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death.



Did St. Josephat die in vain? November 20, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Christendom, Ecumenism, episcopate, General Catholic, Holy suffering, martyrdom, Revolution, sanctity, scandals, secularism, Society, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Via reader Skeinster, a really good post from Shameless Popery on St. Josephat and what it means to be Catholic and have Faith.  More to the point, with all the ecumania and doctrinal indifference, did St. Josephat and other martyrs to the Faith die in vain?

392 years ago today, Saint Josaphat, an Eastern Catholic bishop in Ukraine, was dragged out of his rectory and murdered by the Eastern Orthodox townspeople that he was trying to lead back into union with the Roman Catholic Church. The Church does not hesitate, in her prayers, to say that he poured out his blood like Christ. He died for the principle that it matterswhether we Christians are Catholics. My question for you today is did he die in vain?

After all, I frequently hear that it doesn’t matter whether or not someone is Catholic, as long as they’re Christian. They’ve got better music down the block, or you like the preaching better. Catholicism becomes just one denomination, just one option. Or perhaps we’ll go further and say that the Church itself doesn’t matter: all that matters is having a “personal relationship with Jesus Christ.” That personal relationship is obviously vital, but Cardinal Dolan has pointed out the folly of trying to have the Good Shepherd without the flock, trying to have the King of Kings without His Kingdom, trying to have the Head without the Body of Christ. So to answer my initial question, I ask you to consider four more questions:

The first question: Did Jesus intend to inaugurate the Kingdom of God on earth?Yes.

The very first words out of Jesus’ mouth in St. Mark’s Gospel are “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent, and believe in the gospel” (Mk. 1:15). And we hear that again in today’s Gospel, when Jesus says that, although it has not yet arrived fully, the Kingdom of God is among us.

The second question: Did Jesus establish this Kingdom in His Church? Yes.

In the famous passage of Matthew 16:18-19, Jesus says to Peter, “you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the powers of death shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.” Note, He doesn’t say He’s giving the keys to the Kingdom to everyone, to all believers. Instead, Christ explicitly gives the keys to the Kingdom to St. Peter, the head of the Church, using the singular “you.”……

……….So where do we stand? Do we think the Church is dispensable? That it no longer has the protection of the Holy Spirit, or no longer has the fullness of truth? That Christ’s Church no longer has an earthly head? In short, do we think that St. Josaphat died in vain?

There’s two more questions and answers at the link. You know how I feel.  I think lack of charity and faith in the Church has placed tens if not hundreds of millions in grave jeopardy of hellfire.

Moral cowardice carries a very steep price.

REPOST: A prayer I highly recommend: Crusade for the family prayer November 20, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in Abortion, Basics, Christendom, contraception, Dallas Diocese, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Interior Life, paganism, persecution, secularism, sexual depravity, sickness, Society, Tradition, Virtue.
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REPOST: I was about to post this prayer, then I recalled that it seemed very familiar.  A quick check revealed I was right, I posted this 6 1/2 months ago.

Still, it’s very good, there’s always new readers, so………..enjoy.

We live in a time when the family is under greater attack than at any other time in the history of the Church. We can argue about whether the general crisis facing the Church is the greatest ever, but with regard to the assault on the family by those who would leave souls broken and defenseless, utterly dependent on the government for succor, there has never been a time in 2000 years of Christianity when the family has been so successfully and completely rent asunder.  Be it divorce, abortion, fornication, adultery, radical pretended redefinitions of marriage, general pride and selfishness…….the family has never been more under attack wounded than it has been in the past several decades.

The fact that this attack is the deliberate plan and policy of the ascendant leftist over-culture makes the tragedy surrounding the state of the family all the worse, because this hasn’t happened entirely “by accident,” but has been instigated as part of a concerted plan to weaken the family as an institution, the better to serve the endless appetite for power among certain depraved individuals. While there have been nations that have embraced these evils at times in the past, never has there been such a widespread acceptance by virtually every part of the world as we see today.  Outside some pockets in South America, Africa, and a few other places, almost all of these means of undermining the family are not just legal, but widely accepted and committed with grim abandon.  There remain very few places where none of them are legal, and I would hazard there is no place left on earth where they are not regularly practiced. Thus, worldwide, the family has never faced such a panoply of threats that could even, God forbid, lead to its near extinction.

The prayer below was composed by Fr. John Hardon, SJ, I believe in the early 70s, just as so many of these grave evils were becoming pandemic in the culture.  I think it’s a beautiful prayer that is important enough, and worthy enough, to be included among your regular prayers:

Mary, Mother of God, at your request, Jesus worked His first miracle. He changed water into wine for the wedding guests at Cana in Galilee.  

Over the centuries you have not ceased to obtain countless signs and wonders for the poor, exiled children of Eve.

We therefore ask you to intercede with your Divine Son for the miraculous graces which the modern world so desperately needs:

For the conversion and reconversion of whole nations to Jesus Christ and His teaching on marriage and the family.  

For the heroic preservation among Christians of their faith in the indissolubility of marriage, marital fidelity and the loving acceptance of children, as the bedrock of the Christian family.

For the courage of martyrs in all of us followers of Christ, that we may witness to His power to overcome the powers of darkness that are bent on destroying the human family and the moral law.  

Mary, Mother of the Holy Family, and Mother of our families, pray for us. Amen.

I fear we are going to need the courage of martyrs.  Sadly, such courage is increasingly uncommon today, as we saw VP Biden receive the Blessed Sacrament at a parish in this city, with the idea of enforcing Canon Law to deny him Communion dismissed out of hand over fears regarding the loss of tax exempt status.  As I’ve noted in other recent posts, and as some commenters have noted, as well, the Church is going to lose its tax-exempt status almost no matter what, unless some disastrous doctrinal “compromise” is reached regarding fake sodo-marriage.  Solid Catholic Supreme Court Justice Alito forced that admission from the Obama administration – perverse and always false redefinitions of marriage will inevitably lead to a cruel choice for Holy Mother Church in this country: acquiesce in sins that cry out to Heaven for vengeance, or suffer the loss of probably over half her current revenue with the denial of tax exempt status for failing to accord with federal law.

Folks, I wish I could say I’m rock-solid confident which choice the bishops will make, but I cannot.  Not with decades of example of compromise with the sexular pagan culture.  It was Cardinal Cushing himself who drove a reluctant Massachusetts legislature, predominately Catholic, to vote in favor of legalizing contraception.

I relay these sad facts to further impress upon us all the vital need for more prayer and penance.  I know many of you already do a lot, but we are faced with some of the gravest threats the family and Church have ever faced. I’m afraid we are well past the point for worldly solutions or grand plans to restore sanity to the world.  It is down to Grace, which means prayer and penance.

God bless all of you for what you do.

Deo Gratias!


Cardinal Sarah: not even Pope can change Divine Law on Communion November 20, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, episcopate, Eucharist, General Catholic, Papa, Revolution, scandals, secularism, self-serving, sexual depravity, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, true leadership.
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Via LifeSiteNews, not exactly surprising, but perhaps some cold comfort that not everyone in Church leadership is on board with some of the notions abounding in the Church today.  In fact, Cardinal Sarah gives some commendably strong catechesis below, even if he does not condemn the source of the sudden resurgence of error as some might like:

On the heels of a statement by Pope Francis seeming to suggest openness to non-Catholic Christians receiving Holy Communion, the cardinal who heads the Vatican congregation dealing with the sacraments has said that there are preconditions for the reception of Holy Communion and when those conditions are not met, and the situation is publicly known, ministers of the sacrament “have no right to give him communion.”

Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, added, speaking of priests: “If they do so, their sin will be more grave before the Lord. It would be unequivocally a premeditated complicity and profanation of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Jesus.” [Yeah, well, most priests, in their horrific formation, couldn’t care less.  They’re invincibly convinced none of this matters and almost everyone (save for those mean ol’ judgy types and all right wingers) go to Heaven, anyway]

The statements from Cardinal Sarah come from a forthcoming article in the French Catholic magazine L’Homme Nouveau. Vatican specialist Sandro Magister has published an excerpt in advance.

“The entire Church has always firmly held that one may not receive communion with the knowledge of being in a state of mortal sin, a principle recalled as definitive by John Paul II in his 2003 encyclical ‘Ecclesia de Eucharistia,’” said the prefect. “Not even a pope can dispense from such a divine law.” [I agree.  But perhaps be even more explicit in  your refutation]

……Regarding “communion for all, without discrimination,” Cardinal Sarah says that those in grave sin who are unrepentant (unless in total ignorance) “would remain in a state of mortal sin and would commit a grave sin by receiving communion.

Even in the toughest case of an abused wife who left her first marriage and was remarried without an annulment, Cardinal Sarah notes there can be no communion unless she decides to live without sexual relations with her new partner.

The cardinal’s most powerful statements, however, are his lament at the confusion about Holy Communion among the clergy.  “I feel wounded in my heart as a bishop in witnessing such incomprehension of the Church’s definitive teaching on the part of my brother priests,” he said.  “I cannot allow myself to imagine as the cause of such confusion anything but the insufficiency of the formation of my confreres.” [Bad formation, yet.  But also likely a marked predisposition towards progressive-modernist beliefs, and a likely attachment to sexual immorality which powered such beliefs, before they even entered seminary.  How many good men have been denied admittance to seminary, and how many manifestly unfit men chosen in their stead, all to help force the “crisis in the priesthood” to such a state that the Church would, in desperation, complete the final destruction of the priesthood by opening it to married men and even women?  That’s been the modernist game for 50 years now, anyway]

Recalling his position as “responsible for the discipline of the sacraments in the whole Latin Church,” Cardinal Sarah said he was “bound in conscience” to spell out the Church’s teaching regarding sexuality – the source of much of the current confusion.

The Church, he said, “stigmatizes the deformations introduced into human love: homosexuality, polygamy, chauvinism, free love, divorce, contraception, etc.”

“In any case, it never condemns persons. But it does not leave them in their sin. Like its Master, it has the courage and the charity to say to them: go and from now on sin no more.”

That’s always been the key, the missing bit from the modernist program to redefine the Church.  They say “go and sin some more,” which is the exact opposite of what Christ and His Church have always said.

We’re all sinners.  All of us sin to one degree or another.  Our Lord warned us more sternly not to judge ourselves superior to those whose outward sins are greater than our own.  But at the same time, Jesus Christ took an already strict Jewish moral law and made it far stricter.  He, God Incarnate, died for our sins, but He did so after conveying a very high moral standard.  We will all fall short of that standard to one degree or another, but what Our Lord made plain was absolutely vital was our constant striving to meet it (carrying our cross).

Modernists throw out the bit about striving, and just pretend – on no real rational basis – that Jesus just forgives carte blanche, no matter how much we not only continue to sin, but make no effort whatsoever to amend our lives.  They reveal their dishonesty in the fact that they pretend Christ’s only condemnation is reserved for their ideological opponents, but I digress.

That’s the key.  Intent. The difference between a faithful soul and an immoral one comes down to will/intention.  The unfaithful soul loves his sins, revels in them, and feels no need to change.  The faithful soul abhors his sins and strives, to varying degrees, to no longer fall into them.  This used to be Catholicism for Kindergartners, but apparently its beyond the vast majority of bishops and cardinals today, who prefer to go along with the zeitgeist than hold culturally disapproved beliefs. It’s only beyond them, because they want it to be.

Check out these awesome pre-conciliar photos November 18, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Tradition, Virtue.
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There are a bunch more at the link.  I’ve seen a few before, but not most:




Seminarians offering prayers for the dead in a cemetery. See that very often anymore?


9 Novices taking vows. Can you imagine?


As I said there are many more at the link.  Enjoy.

Rampant heresy in the Church directly attributable to the Second Vatican Council November 18, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, different religion, disaster, Ecumenism, episcopate, General Catholic, horror, Papa, scandals, secularism, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition.
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I have been wanting to excerpt portions from Phoenix from the Ashes for some time. The problem I’ve had is that the material is so dense and involved (in a good way) that a lot of excerpts, to make sense, would run 2000 words or more. And I know posts that long tend not to get read very much.

But, I found a few brief bits that convey a whole lot in a blog-friendly length.  Author HJA Sire really explodes the notion of female fauxrdination, and in so doing exposes the heresy that is inherent in the post-conciliar ethos.  The Council opened the Church, doctrinally, to numerous modernist notions, including feminist ones.  That relatively narrow conciliar opening has metastasized into numerous areas, one of the most malicious being the notion that women could be ordained to the priesthood.  Even worse, however, has been the corruption of the entire idea of the priesthood.  Ultimately, the Council bears great responsibility for this and many other widely prevalent errors:

Next to the denial of defined dogmas, there is no clearer case of heresy than the advocacy of female ordination: it rejects not only the tradition of the Church from its origins, but divine institution itself; it ignores the condemnations that have declared female ordination heretical, and implies a blasphemous view of Christ’s wisdom and justice in instituting the priesthood in the male sex.  No heresy more comprehensively discards every principle by which Christian doctrine is decided.  The orthodox teaching has been repeated most recently by John Paul II’s Apostolic Letter Ordinatio sacerdotalis of 1994, in which he wrote: “We declare that the Church has no authority whatever to confer priestly ordination on women and that this judgment is to be definitively held by all the Church’s faithful.”  As one would expect in the modern Church, the ruling has been entirely disregarded.  In June 1997 the Catholic Theological Society of America voted by a majority of 216 to 22 that the pope should reconsider the question of women’s ordination.  This evidence that nine out of ten official theologians in the United States are heretics comes as no surprise; nor does one imagine that their unorthodoxy is confined to that sole point. In 2011  likewise some 200 Austrian clergy signed a manifesto demanding female ordination.  In the general run of seminaries, professors reject the orthodox teaching privately and often publicly, and the priests they train treat it as simply another conservative relic that is due for change.  We see here exemplified the contempt in the present-day Church for Scripture, Tradition, and authority, and we see, too, the harvest of submission to modern ideology that the Church sowed in the Second Vatican Council and is now reaping.  [I should add, prior to this paragraph, Sire had spent several pages explaining exactly HOW Vatican II, through the documents produced and approved, provide such a huge opening to error/heresy.  It is a very thorough discussion but one too long to blog effectively]


To put the preaching function of the priest before the sacramental [i.e., the sacrificial nature of the Mass] is a monstrosity in antithesis to religious realities. Yet simply to condemn that error in itself would be to miss its true significance; the intention of the Council in teaching this was to move the Church towards a protestant concept of the ministry, a doctrine that rejects the sacramental office of the priest and substitutes a ministry of the word.  That lead has been used by the modernists to promote an evangelical doctrine (in the sectarian sense of the word) that empties the priesthood of theological meaning. [by turning the priest into an educator, an administrator, a “presider,” and even a first among equals, sacramentally] 

Thus the constitution De Presbyterorum Ministerio et Vita [The Vatican II document on the priesthood] stands as one of the main contradictions to the notion that the documents of the Second Vatican Council, as its apologists like to argue, are of a faultlessly orthodox nature.  Its teaching is not traditional and was not intended to be traditional. With an ill-conceived aim of ecumenism, the Council allowed itself to be imposed on by those whose program was to diminish the Catholic theology of the priesthood.  The intentions of that party have been developed in practice, producing priests whose view of their office is in complete rejection of Catholic Doctrine.  When the Church comes to judge the Second Vatican Council in the light of true tradition, the constitution on the priesthood will be one of the documents that most call for disavowal and condemnation.  

———End Quote———

HJA Sire has now, 3/4 of the way through the book, shown glaring problems in several of the documents of Vatican II. As he notes, it is possible – though unbearably boring – to read large sections of Vatican II and find no problems at all.  But that’s like saying a serial killer is really just a nice, quiet guy, except for those 3 hours a month when he butchers someone.  It is meaningless. The problem in Vatican II is not with the orthodox majority, it is with the nebulous, problematic, and even erroneous majority.  Not perhaps erroneous by direct promotion of error, but by being so nebulous and so open to radical interpretation that it permitted – and almost demanded – radically modernist/heretical consequences to flow from the documents.

There is a tremendous amount of gold in Phoenix from the Ashes.  I am not done, yet, but it’s 97% awesomeness with occasional odd rants thrown in.  I guess we trads are not without our little foibles.

Consider the above possibly some useful information when confronted with individuals who insist that there is nothing wrong with the documents of Vatican II, but only their unorthodox interpretation.  Sire’s prime contention (similar to previous authors like Michael Davies, though Sire is much more forceful and to the point) is that the nebulous bits, and how to draw them out into formal error, radically changing the Church, were always intended by the modernists at Vatican II, and are inseparable from the documents as produced.  I am inclined to agree with him, for whatever that’s worth.  I think this is absolutely critical information to know, for the restoration of the Church must be based on a clear understanding of the ultimate source of the errors that have caused such devastation in the Church.

Michaes (Micah) Chapter 3: God’s wrath on unworthy shepherds November 17, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, Bible, catachesis, different religion, episcopate, error, General Catholic, Papa, reading, Revolution, scandals, secularism, Society, the struggle for the Church, Tradition, Virtue.
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The prophet Michaes, or Micah, was a contemporary of the great prophet Ezekias (Ezekiel).  Both of these men lived in a time of general Jewish apostasy, an apostasy that was punished by God with the fall of the Kingdom of Judah, the sacking of Jerusalem, the destruction of the Temple, and the Babylonian exile.  This is what God allows to happen when His people, and especially His priests, become unfaithful.  There was great unfaithfulness in the time of Michaes, especially serial fornication, even fornication within the Temple itself, adoption of pagan beliefs and practices including the sacrifice of infants to the demon Moloch, excessive greed and lust for material comfort, and rejection of the plain command of God as revealed through Scripture and prophets.

Michaes Chapter 3 is a specific warning to the priests and Levites as to what was to befall them for their heretical unfaithfulness:

1 And I said: Hear, O ye princes of Jacob, and ye chiefs of the house of Israel: Is it not your part to know judgment,

2 You that hate good, and love evil: that violently pluck off their skins from them, and their flesh from their bones?

3 Who have eaten the flesh of my people, and have flayed their skin from off them: and have broken, and chopped their bones as for the kettle, and as flesh in the midst of the pot. [This was said in response to decades of abdication of duty on the part of the priestly caste, who failed to call the people back to the truth faith and far too often fell into error and grave immorality themselves]

4 Then shall they cry to the Lord, and he will not hear them: and he will hide his face from them at that time, as they have behaved wickedly in their devices. [They shall do this once the chastisement begins in earnest, in this case, when the Assyrians had 200,000 troops ringed around Jerusalem]

5 Thus saith the Lord concerning the prophets that make my people err: that bite with their teeth, and preach peace: and if a man give not something into their mouth, they prepare war against him. [Those few who remain faithful were despised for so doing, and were the subject of vicious attacks from those who had fallen into sin and error]

6 Therefore night shall be to you instead of vision, and darkness to you instead of divination: and the sun shall go down upon the prophets, and the day shall be darkened over them.

7 And they shall be confounded that see visions, and the diviners shall be confounded: and they shall all cover their faces, because there is no answer of God. 

8 But yet I am filled with the strength of the spirit of the Lord, with judgment and power: to declare unto Jacob his wickedness, and to Israel his sin. [The faithful prophet persisted in spite of all persecution and opposition]

9 Hear this, ye princes of the house of Jacob, and ye judges of the house of Israel: you that abhor judgment, and pervert all that is right.

10 You that build up Sion with blood, and Jerusalem with iniquity. 

11 *Her princes have judged for bribes: and her priests have taught for hire, and her prophets divined for money: and they leaned upon the Lord, saying: Is not the Lord in the midst of us? no evil shall come upon us. [They’ve been condemned. Now come the consequences]

12 Therefore, because of you, *Sion shall be ploughed as a field, and Jerusalem shall be as a heap of stones, and the mountain of the temple as the high places of the forests.  

I’ve written about Old Testament types of the New.  It is always a bit dodgy reading too much into particular bits of Scripture, but given the chastisements of the church of the old covenant and the parallels with the present crisis in the Church, there is certainly grounds for concern.  This isn’t to say the world is about to end.  But I don’t think it takes any special knowledge of prophesy to forecast that the Church as a whole has some very dark days ahead, and the leadership, for its role in the crisis, could be coming to an account with God.

Or not. Either way, we do need to pray for our Church leaders, no matter how they may disappoint us.  It is our duty.  I like some of the intentions for Church leadership I’ve heard from readers, praying for their faithfulness and fidelity to Church belief.  Those are very good starting points.

Special Prayer to St. Joseph after Rosary (and the sorrows and joys of St. Joseph) November 12, 2015

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Good St. Joseph, Grace, Interior Life, Saints, sanctity, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition, Virtue.
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For a long time early in this blog’s days I tried to encourage readers to foster a devotion to St. Joseph.  I cannot stress the degree to which that great Saint’s intercession has helped me, and in how many ways.  I consider St. Joseph, along with the prayers of my wife and her download (24)departed mother, as the prime means by which I got clean.  I haven’t shared my getting clean and conversion story much, as far as getting clean, when I finally did in 2007 I was not looking to get clean.  Really a miracle, I suffered very few withdrawals, quitting opioids was  something that more happened to me as a work of Grace, rather than anything I did.  St. Joseph, I am convinced, played a huge role in that.

Of course, good St. Joseph has done far more than that for your not humble enough blogger.  I like to think I have become a far, far better father than I was through the intercession of the foster father of the Lord. I think his intercession has made me a much better man. Certainly his intercession has been vital in my attempts to become a better Catholic. I think he speaks through this blog, in a sense.

So I’ve been remiss in not doing sharing more devotions to St. Joseph over the past 3 years or so.  I’ve been privately using prayers from a nice book of St. Joseph prayers for a while, but for some reason failed to share any with you.  Even though November is not exactly a month dedicated to Our Lady’s chaste spouse and protector, I thought no better time than the present.

The prayer is a beautiful meditation and imprecation to St. Joseph to be prayed after completing a Rosary. I think it very appropriate for this particular time in the history of the Church. After that, I include the seven sorrows and joys particular to St. Joseph. I pray you find this post edifying and helpful!

To thee, O blessed Joseph, do we have recourse in our tribulation, and having implored the help of thy thrice-holy Spouse, we confidently invoke thy patronage also.

By that charity wherewith thou wast united to the Immaculate Virgin Mother of God, and by that fatherly affection with which thou didst embrace the Child Jesus, we beseech thee and we humbly pray that thou wouldst look graciously upon the inheritance which Jesus Christ has purchased by His Blood, and assist us in our needs by thy power and strength.

Most watchful Guardian of the Holy Family, protect the chosen people of Jesus Christ. Keep far from us, most loving Father, all blight of error and corruption.  Mercifully assist us from Heaven, most mighty defender, in this our conflict with the powers of darkness; and even as of old thou didst rescue the Child Jesus from the supreme peril of His life, so now defend God’s Holy Church from the snares of the enemy and from all adversity.  Keep us one and all under thy continual protection, that, supported by thine example and thine assistance, we may be enabled to live a holy life, die a happy death, and come at last to the possession of everlasting blessedness in Heaven.  


I do wonder a bit about prayers that invoke protection from “all adversity.”  Are we not to take up our cross and follow Jesus?  St. Alphonsus says that salvation without suffering is impossible.  So perhaps consider that in the sense of the state of the Church today, where finding the path to sanctity is so difficult, and not in the broad sense of literally all adversity.


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The Seven Sorrows of St. Joseph:

  1. The doubt of St. Joseph (Matt i:19)
  2. The poverty of Jesus’ birth (Lk ii:7)
  3. The Circumcision (Lk ii:21)
  4. The prophecy of Simeon (Lk ii:34)
  5. The flight into Egypt (Mt ii:14)
  6. The return from Egypt (Mt ii:22)
  7. The loss of the Child Jesus (Lk ii:45)

The Seven Joys of St. Joseph:StStylianos

  1. The message of the angel (Mt i:20)
  2. The birth of the Savior (Lk ii:7)
  3. The Holy Name of Jesus (Mt i:25)
  4. The effects of the Redemption (Lk ii:34)
  5. The overthrow of the idols of Egypt (Is xix:1)
  6. Life with Jesus and Mary at Nazareth (Lk ii:39)
  7. The finding of the Child Jesus in the Temple (Lk ii:46)



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