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Thank You For Your Prayers My Son’s Tumor Has Shrunk March 24, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, thanksgiving.
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There were a range of options of what might come out of my son’s follow-up MRI for the brain tumor discovered after he had a massive seizure 6 weeks ago, and aside from a total miracle (the tumor being completely gone) we got about the best possible option – the tumor is smaller and certainly appears both benign and stable.  The shrinkage was probably due to swelling associated with the original seizure going away, but that means this tumor isn’t aggressive and isn’t growing at any appreciable rate.

So now we’ll just keep on keepin’ on, my son will get MRIs at three month intervals now and he’ll continue on the Keppra anti-seizure medication.  He’s been doing awesome, his reading has gotten at least back to baseline and in fact is probably surpassed where he was before the seizure.  It was a blessed day all around.  I thank all of you so much for your prayers and ask if you would continue them, since this is still a serious situation and eventual surgery remains a strong possibility.  But the longer that can be put off the better, and if prayer we hope it will never be needed.

Thank you all again, from the bottom of my heart, from a terrible shock and of course worry this has turned out just about as best as could have been imagined.  And we of course thank God that He has seen fit to insure that my son is at least stable and that his health can be pretty easily managed so we may – I pray – enjoy our time together for many years to come.

 

Meditation for the Annunciation: Love Our Lady in Her Sufferings March 21, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Holy suffering, Interior Life, Our Lady, reading, Saints, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Victory, Virtue.
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From The Victories of the Martyrs by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori, one of my two “favorite” Saints, some excerpts from a sermon he gave  on The Dolors of Mary.  The excerpt is cut and pasted from pages towards the back of the book which are not numbered, which makes referencing them extra fun.  At any rate, with the “Little Christmas” of The Annunciation coming up this Saturday, I thought it timely to post this material, which closes with the four promises made to St. Elizabeth of Hungary by our Blessed Lord, concerning the benefits He would shower on those who develop a deep devotion of, and meditation on, the Dolors of Our Sorrowful Mother:

To understand how great was the grief of Mary we must understand, says Cornelius a Lapide, how great was the love she bore her Son.”  But who can ever measure this love?  Blessed Amadeus says that “natural love towards Him as her Son, and supernatural love towards Him as her God, were united in the heart of Mary.”  Those two loves were blended into one, and this so great a love that William of Paris does not hesitate to assert, that Mary loved Jesus “as much as it was possible for a pure creature to love Him.”  So that, as Richard of St. Victor says, “as no other creature ever loved God as much as Mary loved Him, so there never was any sorrow like Mary’s sorrow.”…….

…….St. Bernadine of Siena even says that “the sufferings of Mary were such, that had they been divided amongst all creatures capable of suffering, they would have caused their immediate death.”  Who, then, can ever doubt that the martyrdom of Mary was without its equal, and that it exceeded the sufferings of all the martyrs; since, as St. Antoninus says, “they suffered in the sacrifice of theri own lives; but the Blessed Virgin suffered by offering the life of her Son of God, a life which she loved far more than her own.”

………[L]et us be devout to the dolors of Mary, Saint Albert the Great writes, that “as we are under great obligations to Jesus Christ for His death, so also are we under great obligations to Mary for the grief she endured when she offered her Son to God by death for our salvation.”  This the angel revealed to St. Bridget: he said that the Blessed Virgin, to see us saved, herself offered the life of her Son to the Eternal Father; a sacrifice which cost her greater suffering than all the torments of the martyrs, or even death itself.  But the divine Mother complained to St. Bridget that very few pitied her in her sorrows, and that the greater part of the world lived in entire forgetfulness of them.  Therefore she exhorted the saint, saying: “Though many forget me, do not thou, my daughter, forget me.”  For this purpose the Blessed Virgin herself appeared in the year 1239 to the founder of the Order of Servites, or servants of Mary, to desire them to institute a religious order in remembrance of her sorrows; and this they did.

Jesus Himself one day spoke to Blessed Veronica of Binasco, saying, “Daughter, tears shed over My Passion are dear to Me; but as I love My Mother Mary with an immense love, the meditation of the sorrows which she endured at My death is also very dear to Me.”  It is also well to know, as Pelbart relates it, that it was revealed to St. Elizabeth of Hungary, that our Lord had promised four special graces to those who are devout to the dolors of Mary: first, that those who before death invoke the divine Mother, in the name of her sorrows, should obtain true repentance of all their sins; second, that He would protect all who have this devotion in their tribulations, and that He would protect them especially at the hour of death; third, that He would impress upon their minds the remembrance of His Passion, and that they should have their reward for it in Heaven; fourth, that He would commit such devout clients to the hands of Mary, with the power to dispose of them in whatever manner she might please, and to obtain for them all the graces she might desire.

———–End Quote———-

I have great appreciation for the all the writings of the Moral Doctor (Liguori), but I have found The Victories of the Martyrs the least best of the nine volumes of his ascetical writings that I have read to date.  Saint Alphonsus, probably due to limitations of time, focused exclusively on the early martyrs of the Roman Empire, and then skipped ahead to covering the 17th century martyrs of Japan, which he covered in detail one might describe as excruciating.  There is nothing in between, even with the martyrdom (white or red) of millions of Catholics at the hands of muslims, or Eastern Orthodox, or pagans in northern Europe, or wherever.

Certainly a volume attempting to category every major Christian martyr from every time would quickly turn into a library itself, but I was hoping that the saint might cover a bit broader range of martyrs both chronologically and geographically.  Perhaps my expectations were out of line.

Please understand, I am not saying I don’t like the book.  Only that compared to the sublime excellence of the other eight volumes I’ve read, this one was only very good.  So far, I still have probably 50-60 pages left (it’s hard to tell, with the inexplicable editorial decision not to number the last 100-odd pages).  Perhaps I’ll be blown away in the 10% or so remaining, but perhaps not.

I am looking forward to seeing other volumes by Liguori, who wrote torrentially, translated into English (or re-printed, since there are translations long out of print).  The twenty-two volumes of his ascetical works were only a small portion of his total output. Since good souls have taken on the project of translating much of Bellarmine’s writings into English (previously available only in Latin), I pray they consider delving into this saint, as well.

That is, if anyone at Mediatrix Press is listening reading.  Hint.

Prayer for Grace to Overcome Serious Weakness/Attachment to Sin March 21, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Holy suffering, Interior Life, mortification, reading, sanctity, Tradition, Virtue.
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This prayer is especially suited for those who struggle with addiction or obsessive/compulsive behavior.  It is from Father’s Manual by Fr. A Coomes, SJ.

Addiction is a hell I well know.  Addiction may or may not be a disease, but it is certainly self-inflicted, as many of our worst wounds are.  There is also a huge spiritual component to addiction that so many in programs like AA and NA miss.  The founders of AA described addiction in demonic terms, as a “cunning and baffling enemy,” and this definition was not accidental.  While they were loathe, for a variety of reasons, to make Alcoholics Anonymous an explicitly Christian program, what all the _________ Anonymous programs do is essentially instill a vaguely Christian form of spirituality.  They even say that recovery can only come from a spiritual awakening.

Many AA and NA meetings are hosted in churches, but those churches are almost universally protestant.  A more explicitly Catholic program would surely be more effective but might turn people off.

Today, even in traditional Catholic parishes, the most rampant addiction is less substance abuse than it is porn use and self-abuse.  Again, a cunning and baffling enemy has turned many people into slaves to their passions.  But these people most often carry around their porn theater in their pocket.  It becomes a nightmare many have a hard time escaping.

The prayer:

Lord Jesus Christ, You are the strength of the weak and the confidence of those who trust in You.  Be my secure confidence and my abundant strength!

Teach me to understand myself and to believe in the effectiveness of Your saving Grace. Grant me the courage not to stop trying and teach me the humility to trust in You when I tend to be discouraged by my weakness.

Give me, too, the honesty needed to face my problem without excuse and without pretense, and give me the practical good sense to accept the means needed to help myself.  Most of all, give me the wisdom and faith to make a good Confession, and to have the firmest purpose of amendment.

Towards any who criticize me for weakness, give me charity; with those who do not understand, give me patience; and give me the humility to accept whatever aid I may receive from those who want to help me.

And, above all, let me never forget that yYou love me and that You earnestly want to help me.  Let me be completely convinced, too, that You more than anyone can assist me – – and that you will support me at all times if only I learn to put a realistic trust in You.

———-End Quote———-

I found NA to be very helpful in the initial stages of becoming clean, but after a while I recognized the limitations in a system where many simply treat the spiritual aspect – which is the point of it all – as a joke.  I determined I would be better off going to the source, so to speak.  I have never had cause to regret that decision, but also know that NA remains available should I need it.

Sorry I’ve been away so much.  My son had a major test yesterday. We’ll get the results on Thursday.  Thank you for your continued prayers.  God bless you.

DON’T GO TO COLLEGE! March 15, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, It's all about the $$$, scandals, secularism, Society, Tradition.
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Interesting video by Stefan Molyneux below, and one that is most timely for my family.  To make matters bearable for my wife, we “paired up” my oldest and 2nd oldest daughters, born 18 months apart, into the same school grade when the started kindergarten many years ago. This made eminent sense, as the twins came after these two and would constitute their own grade.  So my oldest daughter started homeschooling at age 6 while the next was 4.

But what that also means is that I will have two girls graduating high school the same year, 2018.  For a long time, however, we have had the strong sense that our oldest daughter was not destined for college, while her younger sister was much more likely to go.  And that’s very much turned out to be the case.  Our oldest might go to community college or get a 2 year degree in some kind of artistic field.  Her sister, however, is taking the standardized tests and doing really very well.  She might wind up with a better score than any I was able to attain by the time she’s done.

Right now, however, she’s leaning towards a natural science degree, in a “hard science” like biology.  While she’ll probably attend UD – which is her school of choice – I kind of view a BS in natural science as sort of the floor  for a major that makes getting a degree worthwhile, economically. Especially when you factor in the fact that UD is a private university. I’m also leery of biology as a degree, even at a fairly Catholic uni like UD, because the field of biology is eaten up with the cult of evolution.

The commentary from Stefan Molyneux plays into this thesis.  It makes me want to encourage her exploring engineering a bit more, perhaps biomedical engineering as a cousin she is close to is majoring in right now at UT-San Antonio.  But J really wants to stay close to home.  We’ll see.

I have been pretty upfront with my kids, however.  If they want to get a degree, it needs to be in some field where there is a reasonable payout for the hideous expense involved, be it finance, compsci, engineering, hard science, management information systems, or whatever.  Otherwise, they better get pretty close to a full ride scholarship, or it ain’t happening.  I am also hopeful that online degrees of low cost but sufficient gravitas really begin to emerge as my kids enter college. That might be another alternative.

It is a brilliant point to bring up the fact that making college “free” would have the direct effect of radically reducing the worth of having a college degree – about akin to a high school diploma today.  Then an entire new level of credentialization would have to emerge to replace what college is today – be it post-graduate degrees or something beyond PhD.

Interestingly, that is why my alma mater – The University of Texas – has fought for years to keep its enrollment below 50,000, with about 30-35,000 of those being undergrads (of whom maybe 60-70% actually graduate with a degree).  They have done this for several reasons – limitations of space as an urban university, funding limitations, etc., but also because they want the degrees to have a certain value.  At present, UT graduates about 7-8000 undergraduates a year.  There are typically about 300-400,000 living graduates at any one time.  If UT did what A&M is doing, which is expanding to 70,000-80,000 or beyond, they would produce twice as many graduates and potentially reduce the value of their degrees.

It is exceedingly odd for me to say this, though it is a sense I have had developing over the past several years (college not being worth the expense in many degree fields, in addition to being a source of very dangerous indoctrination).  My parents were the first people in both of their families to ever get college degrees, though my mom did not get hers until she was nearly 40.  My brother and sister and I all went to college as a matter of course.  My wife’s experience is similar.  And yet she only used her degree professionally for a few years before graduating to full time motherhood (which may well be the case for most of my daughters).  Here I feel like I am turning my back on something that has been taken for granted as a critical part of the ascent to the upper middle class in this country for generations.

Yet, there are fewer and fewer reasons to obtain degrees of exponentially increasing cost.  There are sources of learning available anywhere in the world today that were unimaginable when I was of college age.  The college experience is increasingly dangerous for souls.  I just had the lamentable tale related to me a few days ago of a father whose daughter was totally lost in the sexular pagan leftist zeitgeist, a zeitgeist she absorbed while a student at Oklahoma University, of all places.  There are very few intellectually and morally “safe” colleges.  I strongly recommend children either go to a college they can attend while living at home, or living with family that can be trusted implicitly.

Lots of factors. Lots of opportunities for soul-crushing mistakes.  Err on the side of caution.  Perhaps more specifically, err on the side of what is the safest route morally and ecclesiastically, even if that involves something of an economic penalty. Easy for me to say, however.

Prayer for Self Control March 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, mortification, priests, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Continuing in this impromptu Lenten series of prayers for establishing a holy and virtuous home life, a prayer/meditation on maintaining self-control at all times.

I am definitely of a quick tempered disposition.  I inherited many things from my father’s side of the family, many very admirable attributes, but this is probably one that is on the debit side.  My paternal grandmother said her father-in-law, my great-grandfather, was the meanest man she ever met.  My dad had a really hard time with his father, who was an extremely hard worker but also extremely demanding. I believe, Deo Gratias, there has been a certain process of mellowing from one generation to the next, but the tendency towards a quick temper – which subsides as quickly as it comes on – has remained.  Also, both my grandfather (lifelong farmer) and father (farm raised/construction/gas fields) were notorious abusers of the language, using foul words as a matter of course, and that’s been another bad habit I’ve struggled against.

That is to say, this prayer from Father’s Manual by Fr. A Coomes, SJ, is something I can really appreciate.  It would be ideal, I guess, if readers could say “this is definitely not a problem for me!,” but I tend to doubt that’s the case.  Note, tendency towards excessive anger is not the only area of self-control addressed, but in raising a whole bunch of kids, it is often among the most prevalent:

Lord Jesus, You told us to learn of  You because You are meek and humble of heart. Teach me Your way of meekness that I may control my mind, my heart, and my tongue.

Give me the manly calm and self-control needed to be an example and inspiration to my family.

Help me to be a considerate husband – to be a true comfort to my wife……..and never quarreling or peevish.  May I be at all times sympathetic, and may my words never be bitter to bring her sorrow.  May I always be understanding, unselfish, and thoughtful in sharing with her the family problems we experience.  Let me be ready to conciliate differences with understanding and never be domineering.

Teach me to be a patient father to my children, inspiring them always by word and example.  May my words always be words that direct and help them, and never words that wound.  When I must correct them, let it not be in anger. And, if I must be firm in my corrections, let me never be crude or harsh.

Let me never use rude or impatient words before my wife and children, nor display an uncontrolled or ill-considered action, which must certainly be a reproach to me afterwards when I contemplate the gentleness and calm of your meek and humble heart.

Finally create in me a spirit of true familial leadership, where I embody all the virtues necessary in a father, husband, and head of the domestic church entrusted to my care.  May I display none of the vices of selfishness, pride, indifference, or failure of leadership. May I in all things lead my family according to Your holy will, for which I will be judged most severely at my death.  May my wife and children submit to my role as leader of the family entrusted to me with willingness and humility.

Please bless our family abundantly and provide us with a joyful and happy Christian home.

———End Quote———

It is a great challenge, adequately balancing proper leadership and necessary firmness with the optimal levels of gentleness and deference.  These days, the great impediment to being a good father and husband is selfishness and carelessness, as we see so commonly in the cultural presentations of oafish, self-serving, uninvolved fathers.  Of course the culture of divorce has a very great deal to do with that.

Even among some traditional priests and laity, however, there seems almost a bias at times against strong leadership which is sometimes slandered as severity, a certain – I am positive it is unintentional – trepidation about fathers going “too far,” or encouragements to fathers towards excessive deference.  There is also sometimes a subtle undermining of the father’s role, in presenting the “ideal” father as meek to the point of emasculated, or gentle to the point of milquetoast.

That does not mean I have not seen very well intentioned Catholic fathers who have perhaps gone a bit too far towards clarity, strength, and decisiveness, which may manifest as a certain tendency towards severity.  As I said, it’s a very difficult balance, but in my limited experience and reading the great mass of deficient fatherhood is on the other side, towards laxity or loss of leadership, both among fathers/husbands who perform their God-given role poorly either due to indifference or lack of knowledge (perhaps more common), and due to the undermining of the father’s/husband’s role by society and, much more destructively, by some of those who should be supporting and upholding that role with all their strength.

This leaves aside the very difficult situation many fathers/husbands face, which is dealing with attempts to usurp their rightful role from within the family itself. This is a very common problem and is found within the most outwardly devout families.  Many women have absorbed some of the noxious ideas floating about in the culture, most of the time unconsciously. Some pious mothers are unaware of how they may be, largely unintentionally, undermining their husband or attempting to subvert his leadership.  Certain priests seem to have a hard time strongly supporting fathers in the face of tearful outbursts in their office or confessional.

All this is to say, the challenges are manifold, especially at this time, though many of these have always existed.  I read a book from a priest written in the 19th century that decried many of these same problems.  Hopefully this prayer will go some way towards overcoming these challenges.  I am looking for a similar prayer intended for mothers and children to aid in their subordinate role in family life, something that is so radically countercultural in these days many have a hard time accepting it.  Generally speaking, in the broader Western world, the overwhelming deficit of virtue and action is on the side of men.  In the much tinier pious Catholic subset, however, the problems are more evenly balanced.

I’ve wandered far enough abroad.  If I keep this up, it’ll be the only post you get today, so I’ll stop.  At root, the best I can do is for all to look to the Holy Family for guidance.  Fathers, look to St. Joseph, mothers, look to Our Lady.  Our Lady never sinned, was preserved free from sin by an act of Grace, and yet she submitted to her husband in all things.  Fathers emulate St. Joseph’s kindness, love, strength, masculinity, and virtue.  I have found you cannot model yourself on St. Joseph, nor ask for his intercession, too much.

 

Prayer for a Christian Atmosphere in the Home March 7, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Lent, reading, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Another helpful gem from Father’s Manual by Fr. A. Coomes, SJ.  Raising a family has always been hard, but with our kids exposed to more temptations and diabolical interference than perhaps any time in history, it is especially vital to maintain the home as a literal domestic church, full of virtue and with clearly marked lines drawn around every possible vice.  I am better at explaining this than I am living it!  We are all fallen creatures and almost all of us have been damaged by detritus we have picked up from the sewer in which we were raised and have been forced to live all of our lives.  That’s not a commentary on anyone’s particular home life, least of all my own (though far more substantial problems can result from less than ideal upbringings, certainly), but simply a recognition of reality . I wasn’t Catholic as a child or young person, I was very secular and accepted without question most of what the world told me – how much of that do I hold onto today? How many bad habits or ideas do I have of which I am unaware?

You get the point.  I thought this was good, hopefully you will, too (pp. 43-6):

Lord Jesus Christ, You are the way and the truth and the life; and it is by following You that we willmost surely find the way to our Father in Heaven.

Help me, instructed by You and  Your example, to create a truly Christian atmosphere in my home.

May there be in all things a deep and true family life in our home, and a family life patterned after the Holy Family at Nazareth.

May You always be a guest at our activities, our conversations, our recreations  – in a home that is truly and meaningfully centered around You.

May Your picture and that of Your Mother on our walls be treasured reminders of Your love for us and a token of our love for You.

May the Holy Bible, and other books and literature that tell us of You, lead us to a closer knowledge of You,a nd be welcomed and read by every member of the family.

May the thoughts expressed in our home be uncomplaining – at one with Your thoughts and those of Your Holy Church.

May there be a deep respect for all things holy, and may my children learn from me and from their mother a love of family prayer and of the Sacraments.

May charity of speech reign in our home.

Instill in use a tolerance of our neighbors that will be free from all littleness – and free from all prejudice.

May our ways be ever gracious in imitation of Your own; and may we show a special regard for the aged, the underprivileged, the handicapped, the infirm.

And, in all the things that I expect of my children and that I want to characterize our home, let me ever be a convincing example.  May my words be always words that I may invite You to utter with me; my thoughts always thoughts that I may ask You to think with me; the feelings I make my own ever be feelings I may ask You to entertain with me; may the interpretations and judgments I make be such that I may expect You to share them with me.

So in all things may I, together with my family, be so directed by the inspirations of Your Grace that we may be completely one in You.

———End Quote———-

Perhaps striving to improve the tranquility, virtue, and piety of your home life could be a (admittedly slightly tardy) part of your Lenten program?  It is for me.

The best way to fix this fallen culture is one family at a time.

Two good videos: another holy sermon, and a good Catholic apostolate to support March 2, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, reading, Restoration, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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First video – I know some of you are aware of Mediatrix Press, but they are producing a whole slew of extremely powerful, edifying titles from some of the greatest Doctors in the history of Holy Mother Church.  Ryan Grant’s project to translate so many of the works of St. Robert Bellarmine into English – which has never before been done – is a huge blessing in and of itself.  But they also have many other great titles, most of which are from long out of print and “forgotten” sources.  An overview of the company below:

I’ve gotten Mediatrix’s translation of Saint Bellarmine’s great treatise on the Antichrist.  It’s excellent.  I look forward to getting the Saint’s autobiography and his catechism.

You can also adopt a book, providing Patreon-type support to help bring books into print.  Check them out!  It is so important to support apostolates like this that do so much to help restore the great Tradition of our faith.  Faith comes by hearing, yes, but also by READING!  I more or less read my way into the Faith, or, more to the point, tradition.  The study of Church history is the process of becoming a Catholic.

At any rate, the other video is a good sermon by that priest so many admire – and rightly so – this time on the subject of being a friend of the cross.  He talks about the need to make holy communions, and to have a lot of intentions when we go to the rail to maximize the benefit of the grace we receive, he speaks of overcoming regret in a positive way, not moping on it or endlessly kicking ourselves over past failings, but using the pain of those failures as a source of motivation, and he speaks of how to pray to gain healing for past wounds – self-inflicted and otherwise.

I’m out of time to give a better description, but it’s a very good sermon.  If you’ve heard many of this priest’s sermons before, some of this may sound familiar, but I think it’s a new and expanded take on the topic (and I’m remembering the days when we had 50+ minute sermons at Mater Dei!  Not anymore, they’re generally much shorter).  Anyway, enjoy:

Prayer For Unity of Faith in a Divided Family February 28, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, General Catholic, Interior Life, sanctity, Tradition, unity, Virtue.
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Pulling some more content from Father’s Manual by Fr. A Coombs, SJ (before they went insane), a nice little prayer and devotion for families that are divided in faith.  I certainly know the pain of that situation, while my own “nuclear” family is at present and by God’s Grace at one in the Faith, none of the rest of my family is Catholic.  I know how painful that can be.  I imagine it would be even more painful to be divided on such a vital matter from one’s spouse or children.  I pray I never have to experience that myself, while I pray for forgiveness from my parents by alienating myself from their faith.  It was something I simply had to do, for many reasons, and it has changed my life, let alone making my salvation so much more possible.

That aside, I pray some who struggle in this situation find this prayer helpful (I changed the prayer to work for either spouse; it was originally intended for husbands):

Lord God, according to your holy designs you have ordained that in matrimony man and wife shall be so closely united as to become “one flesh.”  Grant now that my [spouse] and I may be closely united in all things according to your holy law.

Grant us  your abundant graces that we may enjoy the blessing of being joined by a common faith.  You know what it would mean to us if we could share completely the same religious views and convictions, if we could be united closely in the same religious practices and observances.  You know what it would mean if we could share the same belief in the sacraments and have the same understanding of them and the same love for them.

That this may be realized according to your holy ways, let me never falter in my own personal obligations and in my observances of all that is by your law of love.  Bestow, in your mercy, your bounteous graces now on my [spouse] and me so that one day, as completely united as possible in this life, we may both approach in joy your communion banquet and there receive together your blessing and your love.

———-End Quote———

 That prayer is quite a bit shorter than yesterday’s!

Prayer for the Grace of Fatherly Wisdom and Responsibility February 27, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, mortification, Restoration, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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From a nice little prayer book my wife gave me – no hint there, I’m sure! – called, simply, Father’s Manual.  There is much good advice in this book, which is presented in the form of prayers one may offer up to be a good, wise, just, and holy father.

So many men today who are having children of their own had either only a weak or no good fatherly guide on which to model their own behavior as father and head of the domestic church.  Even those who had good fathers in their lives swim in a cultural sewer that inculcates perverse ideas regarding fathers and fatherhood on a constant basis.  These prayers, then, can be very helpful for men who are struggling in the roles to which they will be held to a strict accounting at their particular judgment.  Even for those who are very solid in their roles as father, I hope some of these will be helpful reminders.  The excerpt below is on praying for the Grace of fatherly wisdom and responsibility, pp. 22-26:

Heavenly Father, in establishing the family, you have decreed that the child should have a need for both father and mother – and have made each of them, as parents, responsible to you for the souls of their children, which have been created to your very image and likeness.

So, as a father, I must realize that I shall give a severe account to you for any laziness or indifference in the fulfilment of my office.

Bring me to be a good father to my children.

Let me never be a slacker in the sacred trust which I have accepted from your hands.

It is not permitted me, I know, to push off on my wife the obligation of parental control; I have my own part of this burden and a responsibility.  So may I always accept my share of the parents’ duty and carry it out prayerfully and dependably.

Your plan for the family and its needs makes it plain that the fact that I work all day to provide our material living does not permit me to remain aloof from the problems of rearing the children and directing them.  Let me always realize deeply that my calling to be a parent is a full-time job, which admits of no vacation.

May I prayerfully strive to work harmoniously with my wife in all things pertaining to discipline in the home – discussing matters privately with her and working them out cooperatively.  And my I never bicker with her or argue before my children, especially in matters of family policy or discipline.

May the consideration I show my wife deepen my children’s love for her as their mother.

Let the correction I give my children be quiet and fatherly, yet firm – and may it always be the fruit of prayer.

Let me realize deeply my obligation of being a companion to my children, sharing their interests and enthusiasms, guiding them, counseling them, encouraging them.

And in the corrections that I must administer, may my children be able to to look to me and see in my life an example of everything that, as a father, I require of them.

Let them see in me a fitting example of truthfulness at all times, of honesty in dealing with them and with my fellow man, of reverence for God in all I say and do, of dignity, always, in my speech, which should never be such that I may not approve the same words in them.  But rather in all things may I teach first by actions what I must require of my children by fatherly command.

Teach me, heavenly Father, to model my thinking and willing and acting after your own all-wise fatherhood and thus may I return responsibly and reverently to you the souls of the children you have entrusted to me.

———–End Quote———–

I should add, while the above was certainly tailored specifically for fathers, mothers could certainly derive great fruit from such prayers/meditations, with suitable changes.  The unique role of the father, however, has been often even more under threat in our culture than has that of the mother, or at least some strange derivative of what was traditionally associated with motherhood.  Then again, men aren’t as frequently sold a horrific pack of lies asserting that killing one’s own offspring is the way to personal empowerment.  So perhaps the threats are a bit differently orientated, but of the same magnitude for both mothers and fathers.

I pray you find this useful and/or edifying!

The Media’s “Job,” and Some Just Can’t Handle the Truth February 24, 2017

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, cultural marxism, Domestic Church, family, General Catholic, rank stupidity, silliness, Society.
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A couple of brief, close out the week items via reader T.  First up, the media let’s us know what their real job is, not just presenting events as they occur in a factual and unbiased manner, but, no, telling us scary, unstable, easily enraged little people what to think:

Secondly, the billboard below apparently enraged some North Carolina feminists:

billboardrevised

Seems pretty straightforward to me. I guess theirs no accounting for taste, but I think you have to be pretty messed up to find this notion so offensive as to stage a protest……..next to a billboard:

A billboard on Interstate 40 West near Winston-Salem is angering many who say its message is offensive to women.

The board reads: “Real men provide. Real women appreciate it.” The owner of a Winston-Salem women’s boutique called Kleur has organized a demonstration against the billboard’s message for Sunday at 11 a.m.

On the plus side, from one of the comments:

the women’s movement nor their marches represent me…this sign does!

What do you lovely ladies think?