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Catholic Tradition – Mass offered aboard LST-782 off the coast of Iwo Jima in WWII October 23, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Eucharist, fun, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, history, Latin Mass, sanctity, Tradition, Virtue.
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Reader MFG sent this in and it is great.  I don’t think I would have enjoyed much swaying back and forth as they did during this Mass on board ship.  Must have been some pretty good swells.  Unpleasant, to say the least.

This is how the Mass was offered for well over a millennium, before the dark times, before the Empire, er  I mean the “reforms.”  Sorry, channeled Obi Wan Kenobi there for a minute:

Just a bit of Catholic greatness for you.

The expense is reckoned, the enterprise is begun; it is of God, it cannot be withstood.  So the faith was planted; so it must be restored.

And so it will be.  All in God’s good time.

Great sermon on the horrid evil of admitting manifest sinners to the Blessed Sacrament – FIXED October 23, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in abdication of duty, Basics, Bible, Christendom, damnable blasphemy, disaster, episcopate, error, Eucharist, foolishness, General Catholic, horror, Latin Mass, sadness, scandals, secularism, self-serving, SOD, Tradition, Virtue.
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I do not know this priest’s name, and even if I did they like to be anonymous, anyway.  But this is the 5th or 6th sermon of his I’ve heard that has extremely solid.

The priest goes over very solid ground rules regarding the state our souls must be in for valid and holy reception of the Blessed Sacrament, reception that fills our souls with Grace instead of bringing condemnation upon us.  The priest notes that sins against the 6th and 9th Commandments have always been understood as placing a soul in a position that it is unworthy to receive Christ Real Presence.  A dead body cannot be fed, the priest notes, and in the state of mortal sin, our souls are dead.

After solid background, the priest shifts to the recent Synod of Darkness.  He notes how it appears that many bishops are not interested in guarding the Holy of Holies.  The priest goes on to list aspects of the egregious elements of the midway “Relatio” which has served as an awesome tool in advancing the modernist agenda and the destruction of souls, hardly ameliorated by the “revolt” of October 16 and some changes to the final document.  As far as millions of souls are concerned, including some either badly informed or willingly duped Catholics, the Church has formally changed 2000 year old Doctrine.  The damage is incalculable.

Lots and lots of good stuff below.  I strongly advise dedicating 18 minutes to listen:

“Know you not that the unjust shall not possess the Kingdom of God?  Do not err: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor the effeminate, [transgenders, cross dressers, etc]  nor liers with mankind, [sodomites, gomorrists] nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor railers, nor extortioners, shall possess the Kingdom of God.” [1 COR VI:9]  

And thus we know why there is such a powerful movement among liberal Christians, especially those ludicrous sects dedicated towards producing a mockery of Christianity to serve the sodomite interest, either totally downplay Saint Paul or actually advocate for the exclusion of all his Epistles from the Bible.  There is no limit to which error and sin will not stoop.

I pray you find this edifying, as I did.

UPDATE: Thank you to the commenter for letting me know it was the wrong video.  It’s those darned Youtube playlists, if I go to VideoSancto’s page on Youtube, and see the list of all their videos, if I click on one, it doesn’t give me the direct link to that video, but a link embedded in a playlist.  So when VideoSancto uploads a new video, the list updates, and the video I wanted is no longer there – same link, different video. My apologies, that always gets me.

A Novena for our time – Mary, Undoer of Knots October 22, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, blogfoolery, error, foolishness, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Our Lady, sanctity, silliness, Spiritual Warfare, Tradition.
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And boy do we have some knots surrounding us these days!  Father Carota yesterday posted this Novena to Maryh Undoer of Knots. What are these knots?  Fr. Carota explains:

There are the problems and struggles we face for which we do not see any solution … knots of discord in your family, lack of understanding between parents and children, pornography, disrespect, violence, the knots of deep hurts between husband and wife, the absence of peace and joy at home. There are also the knots of anguish and despair of separated couples, the dissolution of the family, the knots of a drug addict son or daughter, sick or separated from home or God, knots of alcoholism, the practice of abortion, depression, unemployment, fear, solitude…Ah, the knots of our life! How they suffocate the soul, beat us down and betray the heart’s joy and separate us from God.”

I might add knots of Synods, bishops, cardinals, and perhaps even popes.  And then there are other knots, knots between faithful souls of good conscience all struggling their best to respond in the greatest charity they are capable of to the crisis which surround, subsumes, and envelopes all in the Church.  These knots of internecine strife between those who should be supportive of one another are sad and maryknotspointless.  We would all do well to remember that none of us have all the answers.

It is a great danger to believe that one is possessed of such unique and full understanding of all these complex and difficult matters of conscience that all that disagree with “our” viewpoint are just terrible Catholics and bad people.

It is also quite amazing for some to believe they have arrived at the only unassailable “right answer” after a few months study on subjects that even the greatest minds in the history of the Church struggled with for a lifetime.

I’m not talking about those who denounce the clear error of modernists, I’m talking about the fratricidal conflict between those most faithful and devout Catholics who should be aiding and assisting each other to form a united front against perhaps the greatest threat to orthodoxy the Church has ever faced.  This is exactly the kind of behavior the modernists (and satan) love to see.  Here we have the Church facing probably the greatest existential threats in the form of militant islam and sexular paganism She has endured in 1700 years or so, and yet all some folks seem concerned about is whether group A is criticizing prelate X too harshly, group B too softly, group C doesn’t have the right relation to authority, group D has caved in too much to authority, group E has…….Blah blah blah.  Count me out!  

Now for the Novena:

heart of mary raysVirgin Mary, Mother of fair love, Mother who never refuses to come to the aid of a child in need, Mother whose hands never cease to serve your beloved children because they are moved by the divine love and immense mercy that exists in you heart, cast your compassionate eyes upon me and see the snarl of knots that exist in my life.

You know very well how desperate I am, my pain and how I am bound up by the Knots.

Mary, Mother to whom God entrusted the undoing of the knots in the lives of his children, I entrust into your hands the ribbon of my life.

No one, not even the Evil One himself, can take it away from your precious care.  In your hands there is no knot that cannot be undone.

Powerful Mother, by your grace and intercessory power with Your Son and My Liberator, Jesus, take into your hands today this knot… I beg you to undo it for the glory of god, once and for all.  You are my hope.

O my Lady, you are the only consolation God gives me, the fortification of my feeble strength, the enrichment of my destitution and with Christ the freedom from my chains.

Hear my plea

Keep me, guide me, protect me, o safe refuge.

Our Lady of the Expectation

If the radical modernists have won, it has been because the elements of orthodoxy in the Church have been too distracted, too self-interested, and too disorganized to form effective resistance.

 

Prepare for All Souls Day October 22, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Four Last Things, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Holy suffering, Interior Life, Latin Mass, Liturgical Year, sanctity, Tradition, Virtue.
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Some helpful links and input from MJD regarding the upcoming Feast of All Souls Day, at which time we in the Church Militant can do such good for those in the Church Suffering.  Some of the links are not to explicitly traditional groups but they are all very orthodox and faithful.  I really love Fr. Weinberger and the Carmelite Hermits.  We must remember that the Poor Souls cannot pray for themselves, they are utterly dependent on us for prayes, penance, having Masses offered, all the sources of Grace that can end their sufferings and allow them to spend eternity in the Beatific Vision of God.  And those souls will then certainly pray for us in this life, and perhaps in our own time in Purgatory, should we be so fortunate.  Purgatory is an utterly beautiful and necessary gift from God to His Church, strongly supported by Scripture and a constant belief in the Tradition.  For most souls, we will not be sufficiently holy and devoid of earthly attachments to spend eternity with God at the moment of our judgment, so Purgatory is a literal gift to us poor weak souls, a great mercy from God to allow us to become worthy of being in His Presence even after death.  Without it, many souls now in Heaven would have never made it there:

Sunday, Nov. 2 is the Solemnity of All Souls on the Church Calendar

The Latin Mass Community at Mater Dei Parish in Irving, TX and other FSSP Parishes and Traditional Latin Mass Communities will celebrate All Souls Day on Monday, Nov. 3

Prepare now to assist in helping the poor souls in purgatory.  Many poor souls (also known as holy souls because they can no longer commit any sins) have no one to pray for them. Less than 1% of those who die go straight to heaven.  We can never assume our recently deceased friends and relatives are in heaven, even if they were fortunate to receive an apostolic blessing before they died. [Great points. The 1% figure may be debatable but great evidence from Scripture and Tradition indicates that very few fly to Heaven at death]

(1) compile your list of deceased relatives and friends

and enroll them in novena masses and prayers during the month of November

suggestions:   Novena of Masses from Nov. 1 – Nov. 30  http://www.stwilliamtheconfessor.org

Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter www.materdeiparish.com

Carmelite Hermits www.carmelitehermits.org Mt. Carmel Hermitage

(2) Plan to go to confession on or before Nov. 1 to offer indulgences for the holy souls

Mater Dei Parish in Irving, TX offers an excellent explanation: http://materdeiparish.com/2014/10/mass-schedule-saints-day-111-commemoration-souls-113/

The month of November is dedicated to the Holy Souls. On all the days from November 1 to November 8 inclusive, a plenary indulgence, applicable only to the Poor Souls, is granted to those who visit a cemetery and pray, even if only mentally, for the departed (standard requirements for indulgences apply*).

Partial indulgences are granted to those who recite Lauds or Vespers of the Office of the Dead, and to those who recite the prayer, “Requiem aeternum, dona eis, Domini, et lux perpetua luceat eis. Requiescant in pace” (“Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace”).

*Requirements for obtaining a plenary indulgence:

Beautiful images of All Souls day from around the world

Beautiful images of All Souls day from around the world

Do the work while in a state of grace,
Receive Sacramental confession within 20 days of the work (several plenary indulgences may be earned per reception),
Receive Eucharistic communion (one plenary indulgence may be earned per reception),
Pray for the pope’s intentions (Our Father and Hail Mary, or other appropriate prayer, is sufficient),
Have no attachment to sin (even venial) – i.e., it is sufficient that the Christian makes an act of the will to love God and despise sin.
Requirements for a partial indulgence: The work must be done while in a state of grace and with the general intention of earning an indulgence.

Notes:

Only baptized persons in a state of grace who generally intend to do so may earn indulgences.1351870483-all-souls-day-celebrated-in-dhaka_1567405
Indulgences cannot be applied to the living, but only to the one doing the work or to the dead.
Only one plenary indulgence per day can be earned (except for prayer at the hour of one’s own death).
Several partial indulgences can be earned during the same day.

If only part of a work with plenary indulgence attached is completed, a partial indulgence still obtains.
If the penance assigned in confession has indulgences attached, the one work can satisfy both penance and indulgence.
Confessors may commute the work or the conditions if the penitent cannot perform them due to legitimate obstacles.1351887094-all-souls-day-celebrated-in-bangladesh_1567874
In groups, indulgenced prayer must be recited by at least one member while the others at least mentally follow the prayer.
If speech/hearing impairments make recitation impossible, mental expression or reading of the prayer is sufficient.
For an indulgence attached to a particular day requiring a church visit, the day begins at noon the day before and ends at midnight.

other sources:

http://www.piousunionofstjoseph.org/

http://www.piousunionofstjoseph.org/the-pious-union/become-a-promoter/

A Saint for our time October 21, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, Christendom, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, manhood, martyrdom, persecution, religious, Saints, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Saint Edmund Campion was a noted English scholar, revert to the Faith, Jesuit, priest, and martyr to the atrocious Elizabethan persecution of Catholics.  Campion had been an Oxford scholar with some St Edmund Campionsympathies to the Faith when the English persecution got restarted under Queen Elizabeth.  He chose to leave the country, entered the famous seminary at Douai, and wound up becoming a Jesuit.  Some years later, he was sent by the Jesuits and the Pope to help sustain the many suffering and still faithful Catholics of England after decades of protestant repression.  He knew that his mission to England would be his last, that he would be inevitably caught, tortured, and killed, as had virtually every other priest sent or remaining in hiding in England.

When he first arrived in England, it came to Campion’s mind to record a testament to the real motives behind his efforts, knowing that the Elizabethan authorities would try to portray him as a treasonous wretch set upon destroying Elizabeth and her totalitarian Tudor state.  This document became known as “Campion’s Brag” and recorded not only his motives, but also his denunciation of some notable protestant errors.  The letter quickly became public and there was a furious response from the authorities.  More publishings from Campion, destroying more protestant errors, quickly ramped up the pressure, and Campion was inevitably betrayed and brought to incredible suffering.

Img_1082But I thought the closing portion of Campion’s Brag, as contained in Evelyn Waugh’s very readable little biography of the Saint, was most appropriate for these very trying times.  They reveal such a wonderful Catholic sense of being, an ethos, that perseveres joyfully even in the midst of unimaginable suffering and repression.   It is the endless charity of the Saints, and their upholding of constant Truth, that has sustained the Faith for these many centuries.  I found Campion’s witness very edifying and helpful as we continue to worry over the future of our beloved Church:

….Many innocent hands are lifted up to Heaven for you daily by those English students, [at the seminary at Douai] whose posterity shall never die, which beyond the seas, gathering virtue and sufficient knowledge for the purpose, are determined never to give you over, but either to win you Heaven, or to die upon your pikes.  And touching our Society, be it known to you that we have made a league – all the Jesuits in the world, whose succession and multitude must overreach all the practices of England – cheerfully to carry the cross you shall lay upon us, and never to despair your recovery, while we have a man left to enjoy your Tyburn, [where the executions of priests took place] or to be racked with your torments, or consumed with your prisons.  The expense is reckoned, the enterprise is begun; it is of God, it cannot be withstood.  So the faith was planted; so it must be restored[We should keep this in mind within our own struggles and concerns today]

If these my offers be refused, and my endeavors can take no place, and I, having run thousands of miles to do you good, shall be rewarded with rigor, I have no more to say but to recommend your case and mine to Almighty God, the Searcher of Hearts, Who send us His Grace, and set us at accord before the day of payment, to the end we may at least be friends in Heaven, when all injuries shall be forgotten.

———–End Quote———–

Such beautiful sentiment!  What great charity, to beg that even one’s tormentor and oppressor may happily meet with you in Heaven!  That is truly a great example for our times, when many may be tempted to campion-imageswrath, hatred, and despair.  It is so very difficult to maintain charity for those we see working, striving to destroy our glorious Faith, planted indeed by God Incarnate in the Second Person of the Holy Trinity, but it is also absolutely necessary.

Our Blessed Lord told us that we shall be judged on the judgment we mete out to others.  Ouch.  I need to stick that to my monitor and look upon it every time I write!  Our Lord also commanded us to be merciful to all, especially those who treat us cruelly or harm us.  Again, so very counter to our fallen natures, but absolutely key to our sanctification!

So do not let yourself be scandalized out of the Church! It has happened to many, and cognizance of that should probably temper more of my writings.  Yes we must oppose error at every turn with great force, as the great Saint Edmund Campion did to his death, but we must also do so with love in our hearts and not the hatred of factionalism. I know I struggle with that personally, this writing, it does take a toll.  Don’t let them take your peace!

And Saint Edmund and his cohort did triumph in the end, the Faith was sustained – crippled, stunted, but remaining – in England in spite of literally centuries of the cruelest persecution, and bloomed back into full flower in the 1830s when the persecution was finally lifted.  It breathed anew for a century or more before the new dark times fell, before the worldwide heresy of modernism became so dominant.  But the experience of these English Catholics and martyrs should give us hope as Campion’s example did them.  We must remain faithful, even as the giants in our Church seem to fall to the world, the flesh, and the devil.

God bless all of you! May He sustain you to endure these terrible trials.

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Another edifying interview by Cardinal Burke October 16, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, episcopate, General Catholic, scandals, secularism, Society, SOD, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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Folks, I labored for an hour and a half on a really good post tying together quotes from Rorate, Fr. Ray Blake, “Boney,” Father Carota………and then WordPress ate it. Not just ate it, but sent it to another dimension where it will never be heard from again.  That stinks. And I am having another crisis day at work, so I have precious little time to post.  Nevertheless, Rorate kindly uploaded another interview Cardinal Burke gave on the Synod, and I thought I would add this. My previous post was based on Rorate’s reporting of scheming manipulation and threats being used to try to coax the more orthodox prelates into embracing the Kasperite – or is that Beroglian – gambit of radical destruction of the Moral Doctrine of the Faith.  It was pretty hot.  Maybe it’s better it was lost.

I will just say this, as a way of conveying aspects of that previous post: there is much sturm and drang about the midway “Relatio,” and whatever the final one – to be released on Saturday, apparently! – will be.  But it is obvious the midway “Relatio” was written in advance of this Synod of Darkness (the words of a local priest).  That “Relatio” had nothing to do with the actual interventions, it was basically another polemic for the radically heretical crowd. Given that the final “Relatio” is due out Saturday, I suspect it is also already written. It may have been written last summer.  In which case, this Synod has always been a sham, a farce, and simply an effort to give some official, “collegial” authority to something written by a small cabal of self-interested individuals.

Sorry for the light content, I do add a few brief comments, I think it important to not always look at merely the surface of Cardinal Burke’s comments, but also the deeper meanings, which are almost universally very strong denunciations of the novelties being foisted on the Church:

Q:  What do we see happening at the Synod on the other side of the “media curtain”?

A:  We see a worrisome skewing of the discussions, because there are some who support the possibility of adopting a practice that departs from the truth of the faith.  Even if it should be evident that one cannot go down that path, many still encourage, for example, a dangerous openness to change with respect to the question of giving Holy Communion to those divorced and remarried.  I do not see how it is possible to reconcile the irreformable understanding of the indissolubility of marriage with the possibility of admitting to Communion those who are living in an irregular situation. To do this is to act as if our Lord’s words were up for discussion when he taught that whoever divorces his wife and marries another woman commits adultery. [Throughout all this discussion, wherein Cardinal Burke gives what I would call sterling witness to the Faith, I do wonder.....what will you do, Your Eminence, if the unthinkable does happen?  I just don't feel that can be ruled out anymore.  I also feel more and more strongly that Cardinal Burke is growing more and more in appreciation of Tradition and in his role as a remarkable shepherd of souls.  He may have failed in the past, he may have weaknesses now, but I'm hard pressed to identify any prelate giving such witness at the Vatican]

Q:  According to the “reformers” this teaching has become too harsh.

A:  They forget that the Lord assures us of the help of his grace to those who are called to live in marriage.  This does not mean that there will not be difficulties and suffering, but that there will always be divine assistance to face them and to be faithful to the end.

Q:  It seems that you represent a minority position.

A:  A few days ago I saw a statement broadcast in which Cardinal Kasper said that things were moving in the correct direction towards openings (to the change of practice).  In a few words, the 5,700,000 Italians who followed that broadcast statement were led to believe the idea that the whole Synod is marching on this path, that the Church is on the point of changing her doctrine on marriage.  But this is simply not possible.  Many bishops have said in their speeches that changes in the doctrine of marriage are not possible. [The modernists are trying to use the media to create an unstoppable force again, as they did in 1962.]

Q:  But what you say is not coming out of the daily briefing from the Vatican Press Office.  Cardinal Müller has also complained about this.

A:  I do not know how this “briefing” works, but it seems to me that something is not working well if the information is manipulated in a way so as to stress only one position instead of reporting faithfully the various positions that were expressed.  This worries me very much, because a consistent number of bishops do not accept the idea of a break with traditional Church teaching, but few know this.  They speak only of the necessity for the Church to open herself up to the clamorous urging of the world as Cardinal Kasper propounded in February.  In reality, his thesis on the theme of the family and on a new form of discipline with respect to the divorced and remarried is not new.  It was already discussed thirty years ago.  [In reality, it has been discussed for 2000 years.  It's always been one of those "hard" teachings, which means it must do great work in keeping souls from satan.  Thus, he hates it and attacks it] Then from this February on it took on a new life,  and it has been allowed to grow in a not innocent way.   But this must stop, because it is provoking the possibility of great damage to the faith.  Bishops and priests say to me that now that so many divorced and remarried men and women are asking to be admitted to Holy Communion because this is what Pope Francis wants.  In reality, I take note that, to the contrary, he has not expressed himself on this subject.

Q:  But it seems evident that Cardinal Kasper and those who speak in agreement with him claim that they have the support of the Pope.

A:  This is true.  The Pope named Cardinal Kasper to the Synod and has let the debate go along this track.  But, as another Cardinal has said, the Pope has not given his pronouncement on all of this as yet.  I am awaiting his pronouncement, which is able to be only in continuity with the teaching given by the Church through her whole history, a teaching that has never changed because it cannot change. [Interesting point.  Cardinal Burke seems to be saying: I don't care what this Synod says, I won't accept any change in this regard unless it comes from the mouth of the Pope. And he feels very strongly the Holy Ghost will somehow prevent that from happening.  I certainly pray he is right.]

Q:  Some prelates who support the traditional doctrine say that if the Pope should makes changes (in that doctrine) they would support those changes.  Is this not a contradiction?

A:  Yes, it is a contradiction, because the Pontiff is the Vicar of Christ on earth and therefore the chief servant of the truth of the faith.  Knowing the teaching of Christ, I do not see how it is possible to deviate from that teaching with a doctrinal declaration or with a pastoral practice that ignores truth. [Don't say "I don't see how," say "It ISN'T possible!"]

Q:  The emphasis placed by the Pope on mercy as the most important, if not the only, idea that should guide the Church: does this not contribute to sustaining the illusion that one can advocate pastoral practice that is set loose from doctrine?

A:  The idea is bandied about that there can be a Church which is merciful and that at the same time does not respect the truth.  But I am offended by the abysmal idea that, until today, bishops and priests could not have been merciful………. [Yes, that's not a very humble idea, is it?  In fact, it reeks of that same modernist pride which leads revolutionaries to conclude that it is only they and their ilk that have ever had true faith, true humility, true charity, etc.  What a crock.]

Q:  Don’t the reformers think about those Catholics who have held their families together even in very difficult situations, and in these situations who have refused to make a new life for themselves?

A:  So many people who have gone through this laborious life effort ask me now if they were totally wrong in their decision.  They ask if they have thrown their lives away in making sacrifices that in the end are of no use.  This is not acceptable. It is an act of betrayal. [Dang right. It is unconscionable.  And these a-hole modernists just don't care. They are basically saying "we prefer the sinner, the heretic to the faithful."  They are saying "we prefer the adulterer to the chaste."  Synod of death.]

Q:  Do you not think that the crisis in morals is deeply involved with the crisis in liturgy? [Great answer below]

A:  Certainly.  In the post-conciliar period a collapse of the life of faith and of ecclesiastical discipline has taken place, seen especially in the liturgical crisis.  The liturgy has become an anthropocentric activity. [Dang right.  Elsewhere in the interview, the secular interviewer himself notes that the Eucharist has become more a matter of "social acceptance by the community" than the reception of the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.  That is to say, the Eucharist has been thoroughly protestantized in the minds of the vast majority of Catholics, even among our exalted eminences]  It has ended up by being a reflection of the idea of man instead of the right of God to be adored as He himself asks.  From here, in the moral sphere attention is focused almost exclusively on the needs and wants of men, instead of on what the Creator has written in the hearts of his creatures. [Dang right] The lex orandi is always bound to the lex credendi.  If someone does not pray well, then he does not believe well and therefore he does not behave well. [So how about a statement about the derangement in the NO in general?]  When I go to celebrate the Traditional Mass, for example, I see so many beautiful young families with so many children.  I do not believe that these families do not have problems, but it is evident that they have more strength to confront them. [Heck yes.]  This has to say something.  The liturgy is the most perfect and most complete expression of our life in Christ, and when all of this is lessened or is betrayed every aspect of the life of the faithful is harmed. [How about this for a response, Your Eminence- only ever again assist at or offer the TLM, publicly or privately.  I know you're already at the TLM at least a couple times a week, but how about always?]

Q:  What can a pastor say to a Catholic who feels bewildered by these winds of change?

A:  The faithful should take courage, because the Lord will never abandon his Church.  We should think about how the Lord calmed the sea in the storm and his words to his disciples:  “Why are you afraid, you men of little faith?” (Mt. 8:26).  If this time of confusion seems to put their faith at risk, they have to only work even harder to live a life that is truly Catholic.  But I am aware that to live in these times is a source of great suffering.

Q:  It is becoming difficult not to think of this as a time of chastisement.

A:  I think about this first of all concerning myself.  If I am suffering at this time because of the situation in the Church, I think that the Lord is telling me that I have need of purification.  And I also think that, if the suffering is so widespread, this means that the whole Church is in need of purification.  But this is not because of a God who is waiting only to punish us.  This is because of our own sins.  If in some way we have betrayed doctrine, moral teaching or the liturgy, it follows inevitably that we will undergo a suffering that purifies us to put us back again on the narrow way. [That is a most beautiful reflection]

————End Quote————

Long enough. God bless Cardinal Burke and his example in these times of suffering.

Who knows, what he is going through now could result in his being much more papabile in the future.

Pope Leo XIII speaks to the Synod and all of us October 15, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, episcopate, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, manhood, Papa, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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In the 1860s, the same revolution which had overtaken France in the preceding century, bringing nothing but misery and destruction in its wake, was being unleashed upon Italy.  Having been subject to the feverish revolutionary sentiment of Napoleon’s conquering army for over a decade, many in Italy had embraced the worst aspects of left wing thought.  Secret masonic societies proliferated, all with the single-minded goal of uniting Italy, then a group of separate states, into one anti-Catholic republic that would crush the papacy and be done with the Church forever.  In 1860, the state of Piedmont, under the republican influence of the Comte di Cavour, invaded the Papal States, under the direct sovereignty of the Pope, conquering large swaths of territory and subjecting them to a radical republican government. As we have seen so often – such as Mexico, where masons were also instrumental in the continual revolutions against the Church – the revolutionaries even went so far as to tell the Church how many priests a certain region could have.  They said one priest could serve 20,000 souls!

In response to this and any other atrocities, the bishops of the former Papal States region of Umbria, led by the Cardinal Archbishop of Perugia, sent a letter to Blessed Pope Pius IX, cataloging many of the errors of the republicans and the struggle the Church was then facing.  I was struck by how much the language of these bishops was in complete contrast to that which emanated from the Second Vatican Council only a century later.  The two – faithful bishops of Umbria, and Vatican II fathers – had rather different things to say about certain topics such as “religious liberty.”  A few select quotes on the matter from this excellent biography of Pope Leo XIII, who, in my mind, surely must be a Saint:

They are offered [the peoples of the conquered regions of the Papal States] , as the basis of reconciliation, [with the revolutionary powers] to accept the condemned and fatal system of the separation of Church and state, which, being equivalent to divorcing the state from the Church, would force Catholic society to free itself from all religious influence…..

The tendency of this last intrigue is patent enough.  It is calculated that the clergy of Italy, violating their own duties, and separating themselves from their lawful pastors, and from you principally; Most Holy Father, who are their Supreme Chief and Ruler, should abase themselves to legitimize and sanction the acts accomplished by the revolution, and thereby become the advocate and accomplice of the total spoliation and destruction of the sacred sovereignty of the Church, which they are now planning so noisily…….

……..And when the overbearing might of the world, in order to supplant it, presumes to enter the sanctuary and to impose on men a fictitious and deceptive morality, it is time that it should hear us repeat: “We must obey God rather than men.” [to impose on men a fictitious and deceptive morality......."We must obey God rather than men".......are you listening, Synod?]

…….We therefore sovereignly deplore both the pretension of our modern politicians, who endeavor to subject to their bondage all ecclesiastical offices, and the blindness of those priests, [and bishops]  who, forgetful of their august calling, and dazzled by the false promises of the world, have strayed away from the sheepfold of Christ.

……It is a grievous error against Catholic Doctrine to pretend that the Church is subject of any earthly power and bound by the same economy and relations which regulate civil society.  The Church is not a human institution, nor is it a portion of the political edifice, although it is destined to promote the welfare of the men among whom it lives.  It affirms that from God come directly its own being, its constitution, and the necessary faculties for attaining its own sublime destiny, which is one different from that of the state and altogether of a supernatural order.  Divinely ordered, with a hierarchy of its own, it is by its nature independent of the state.

———–End Quote———-

Perhaps some key takeaways: the order of most liberal states is antithetical to that envisioned in Christendom throughout most of its history and highly disordered from the right morality.  In addition, We Must Obey God Rather Than Men, no matter how fallen people and the culture may become, nor how tempting it may be.  I am somewhat heartened to see that it appears there are still many leaders in the Church who recognize this, even if their understanding of that obedience may be less than ideal at times.  They still seem to get the basic concept, which is a far cry from Kasper and his ilk, who make no pretense that they are undermining and attacking the directly conveyed Law of God.

Great sermon for you October 10, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Latin Mass, priests, sanctity, scandals, secularism, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I heard this sermon last Sunday and was quite impressed.  I really enjoyed it and got a great deal out of it.  There is an awesome joke at ~10:15 you cannot miss. It’s not a silly, jokey sermon, but this little one liner makes a great point.

The sermon is on the Sacrament of Extreme Unction and the vital role it can play in aiding our final hours or days in this life, or anytime serious illness threatens.  Extreme Unction can certainly be the difference between eternal life, and eternal death.  It is a Sacrament that has, like the others, been very much abused and mistreated in the past 50+ years.  This sermon goes a long way to correcting misunderstandings and abuses:

Another video, an appeal to aid the FSSP’s mission in Columbia.  The TLM is not widely available in huge swaths of Latin America, and encounters a great deal of episcopal opposition.  But wherever it appears it tends to be well received.  Please consider supporting this mission, you will see how to in the video:

More info here.

Saint Peter Julian Eymard on charity October 10, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Admin, awesomeness, Basics, family, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Interior Life, Saints, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I don’t know about y0u, but I need all the reminders, explanations, and exhortations regarding charity that I can get!  I’m always appreciative to read such writings by Saints, and then I look at myself and say: “You stink at this!”

From Vol. 5 of the Eymard Library, The Eucharist and Christian Perfection II:

You must, therefore, practice charity always and in everything.  The opportunities are numberless.  If they do not present themselves, look for them.  When you are free to choose between two good works, the one personal, the other charitable, choose the latter, it has double merit.  But above all, I repeat it, let your charity be humble.  Proud charity is egoism or forced benevolence. [Most interesting point.  And false humility is a most dangerous thing, as well.]

Examine yourselves on these points: Are you charitable supernaturally?  Do you honor brothers by our charity?  Are you devoted to them, or your family?

How many sins we commit against charity!  In thoughts, for instance, by rash judgments.  Remember that what will harass us the most on our death bed – after sins of impurity – will be the memory of our sins against charity.  Who called you to be the judge of your brothers?  That anxiety at our death – according to Saint Vincent Ferrer – is the punishment of such sins which is meted out even in this world.  The first impulses of rash judgments are nothing; but to remain with them, to acquiesce in them, this is to murder our brother in our heart.

And then in words.  How many faults pious souls and religious have to reproach themselves with on this point!  

There are also the sins against charity in action or by omission.  Let us examine ourselves carefully on this point and let us take the means of correcting ourselves.

He who does not sin against his neighbor almost never sins against God either, because love is single, even if it has a twofold object and, as it were, a double channel.

———-End Quote———-

As a controversialist type blogger, much of the above concerns me quite a bit.  There is a fine line between correcting errors abroad for the sake of others, for confirming others in their faith through salutary example of things to avoid, or decrying ongoing scandals in our midst, and lapsing into uncharitable judgment in excoriating others.  This is something I always try to keep in mind, but I know that I fail at times when pushed to the limits of exasperation.

This is something I think most faithful/traditional bloggers, writers, and commentators struggle with.  Some obviously more than others.  I do try to be circumspect and balanced at all times, but I will be honest in admitting that balancing the practice of charity with this blogging habit is not always easy.  I know some priests who would say just stop, don’t mess with it, it’s not worth it, but I know others who feel there is great benefit in efforts like mine and simply counsel prudence in all things.  I have always tended to hear the latter better than the former – our wills are powerful things!

At any rate, I pray you find the above useful and edifying.  I, for one, very much appreciate these calls to examination of conscience I read periodically in the Saints – I just wish and pray I remembered these counsels always, especially when my hot tempered blood is up!

My paternal grandmother, God rest her soul, said her father in law, my great grandfather, was the meanest man she ever knew.  My grandfather was a hot tempered man. It runs in families, I tell you.  So, in our modern parlance, I’m absolutely blameless, right?  Heh.

But those mean men turned 400 acres of Kansas grasslands into a very profitable farming enterprise, well before there was much of any mechanization.  I have a photo of my great-grandfather driving a team of 21 horses to pull what passed for a combine in those days.

That same grandmother said Heaven is an 8×10 room, and it’s not crowded.  And yet somehow we all envision ourselves being there, don’t we?

Lord, have mercy on this sinner.  That is all I can say.

Family Fun that build the Faith – traditional Catholic trivia game October 9, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Domestic Church, Four Last Things, General Catholic, Interior Life, Latin Mass, Tradition.
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I have not gotten this set, yet, but I know some who have and they think it’s quite a bit of fun.  It’s a Catholic trivia set/game from Angelus Press.

Catholic Trivia Traditional Version-340x340

 

I thought some readers might have some interest in getting one of these.  Might make a nice gift for older children.

Some details:

We hope every Catholic family will purchase and spend quality time playing this game together. It makes catechism lessons, lives of the saints, and Church history fun! Educational and entertaining for the whole family. Contains two decks each containing 250 cards; 1,500 questions in total. Six categories: the Baltimore Catechism (C), the Latin Mass (M), and History and the Liturgical Calendar (H). The other contains Popes, Patron Saints and Other Pious People (P); Ritual, Symbol, and Doctrine (R); and Et Cetera (E)

Anybody have one and care to leave a review, please do so.

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