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Bill Murray, serious Catholic? November 21, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, fun, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, manhood, Saints, sanctity, Society, Tradition.
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I have read numerous stories on the internet attesting to actor-comedian Bill Murray’s extraordinary generosity.  While perhaps a bit mercurial, you can find literally hundreds of stories where Bill Murray did something unusually generous or gracious for some person he just stumbled upon.  I figured he was an Irish Catholic, but had no idea of his sincerity in the Faith. It appears he is quite knowledgeable.  He is so knowledgeable he misses the Traditional Latin Mass:

His parents were Irish Catholics; one of his sisters is a nun. This conspicuous religion adds to his broad church appeal (there’s a citation from the Christian Science Monitor on his golfing memoirs). You don’t need to ask if his faith is important to him. He talks about how 19th-century candidates risk not getting canonised because the church is keen to push ahead with the likes of John Paul II and Mother Teresa. “I think they’re just trying to get current and hot,” he smiles.

One new saint he does approve of is Pope John XXIII (who died in 1963). “I’ll buy that one, he’s my guy; an extraordinary joyous Florentine who changed the order. I’m not sure all those changes were right. I tend to disagree with what they call the new mass. I think we lost something by losing the Latin. Now if you go to a Catholic mass even just in Harlem it can be in Spanish, it can be in Ethiopian, it can be in any number of languages. The shape of it, the pictures, are the same but the words aren’t the same.” [Might disagree a fair amount with him here, both on the canonization of John XXIII and on whether it was just the words that changed. It was much more than that, but the general sense he has is right]

Isn’t it good for people to understand it? “I guess,” he says, shaking his head. “But there’s a vibration to those words. If you’ve been in the business long enough you know what they mean anyway. And I really miss the music – the power of it, y’know? Yikes! Sacred music has an affect on your brain.” Instead, he says, we get “folk songs … top 40 stuff … oh, brother….”

So, that’s it, we win, we have Bill Murray.  Heh.

Seriously, I pray he meets his Sunday obligation. Few in Hollywood do.  I did not read the whole piece, I am out of time, so who knows.  Probably one of my brilliant readers will point up the folly of this post very shortly.

It has always been difficult to practice the Catholic Faith November 21, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, Bible, catachesis, error, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, manhood, Society, Tradition, Virtue.
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I was at Mass last night, and was struck by the Epistle from 1 Corinthians Chapter 4.  Saint Paul wrote this letter to the Corinthians to correct certain problems in that community, but I found this lesson very comforting for the present situation in the Church today, when many do not know where to turn or feel that the walls are falling down around them. To some degree, it has ever been thus, although this is one of the worst periods of crisis the Church has ever experienced. Nevertheless, I pray you find this reading as consoling as I did, it really seems to speak to what many souls are feeling right now with all the radical changes that seem to be in the offing in certain dominant sectors of the Church:

Brethren: We have been made a spectacle to the world, and to angels, and to men. We are fools for Christ, but you are wise in Christ! We are weak, but you are strong! You are honored, but we are without honor! To this very hour we hunger and thirst, and we are naked and buffeted, and have no fixed abode. And we toil, working with our own hands. We are reviled and we bless, we are persecuted and we bear with it, we are maligned and we entreat, we have become as the refuse of this world, the offscouring of all, even until now! I write these things not to put you to shame, but to admonish you as my dearest children, in Christ Jesus our Lord.

And no, I am not disheartened or feeling hopeless at all. If I felt hopeless I would not blog.  The very fact that I continue my efforts is a demonstration of my hope in both natural and supernatural solutions to the ongoing crisis.

I write what I write because I find it interesting and edifying and I hope you will, too. Or, I point out some grave problem in the culture, in academia, or even in the Church that my sensus fidei (or my pride) tells me needs addressing.  I know there are at least a couple of readers who are not comfortable with my presentation of questions or even criticism of the Pope, or in pointing out statements from the great Tradition of the Church that are dramatically at odds with thoughts or approaches to the Faith that are being pushed today.  I don’t really see myself ceasing doing so, if I find some encyclical from the past that contains great gems of the Faith, and if that gem contains or illustrates Truth held universally in the Church until the present crisis, I am probably going to post it, even if that gem seems to stand in stark contrast to ideas or approaches to the Faith being pushed today.

To be honest, I don’t wring my hands a great deal over what I post. I certainly think about it, I do check my motivations frequently,  I seek spiritual direction and this blog is monitored by people who maintain oversight over my spiritual life, but this is just one blog among thousands and it’s just my little ‘ol opinions.  I really strive very hard not to take myself too seriously.  I’m just a dude with a computer, nothing more, I make no claim to authority and everyone is free to disagree (but this being my little place on the internet for my opinions, I generally won’t allow myself or those I respect to be just pilloried or trolled in the comments, but thoughtful comments are always welcome, and I try very hard to maintain this courtesy towards other bloggers/internet apostolates, as well).

So…….there you go.  Worth what it cost ya.

Pope Gregory XVI speaks to the Church today…….especially the modernists within November 20, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, damnable blasphemy, episcopate, error, General Catholic, Papa, SOD, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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In 1832, Pope Gregory XVI released his famous encyclical against religious indifferentism, Mirari Vos.  The encyclical was a reaction to the first clear instance of obstinate, erroneous Catholic liberalism, an attempt to meld the Faith and the revolutionary ideas of the 18th century, but which, as always, wound up favoring the latter much more than the former.  A group of one time faithful Catholics under Lamennais of France drifted into more and more errors through their embrace of liberalism, and had to be corrected. Corrected they were, and the rest of the faithful, both then and now, have been greatly edified by the great pontiff’s words.

What follows are some selective excerpts from Mirari Vos.  I would be lying if I said the video I posted  yesterday did not cross my mind more than once or twice while reading the below:

Now We consider another abundant source of the evils with which the Church is afflicted at present: indifferentism. This perverse gregoryxviopinion is spread on all sides by the fraud of the wicked who claim that it is possible to obtain the eternal salvation of the soul by the profession of any kind of religion, as long as morality is maintained[Or so long as one does occasional corporal works of mercy, or, maybe better yet, participates in “ecumenical” activities] Surely, in so clear a matter, you will drive this deadly error far from the people committed to your care. With the admonition of the apostle that “there is one God, one faith, one baptism” may those fear who contrive the notion that the safe harbor of salvation is open to persons of any religion whatever. They should consider the testimony of Christ Himself that “those who are not with Christ are against Him,” and that they disperse unhappily who do not gather with Him. Therefore “without a doubt, they will perish forever, unless they hold the Catholic faith whole and inviolate.” [“Whole and entire,” not kinda sorta, and certainly not possessing antagonistic and heretical protestant beliefs]  Let them hear Jerome who, while the Church was torn into three parts by schism, tells us that whenever someone tried to persuade him to join his group he always exclaimed: “He who is for the See of Peter is for me.” A schismatic flatters himself falsely if he asserts that he, too, has been washed in the waters of regeneration. Indeed Augustine would reply to such a man: “The branch has the same form when it has been cut off from the vine; but of what profit for it is the form, if it does not live from the root?” [Really…..meditate on that in the light of yesterday’s video, when the exact opposite proposition was put forth.]

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Pope in a cowboy hat!

This shameful font of indifferentism gives rise to that absurd and erroneous proposition which claims that liberty of conscience must be maintained for everyone. [So I guess John Courtney Murray didn’t read much of Gregory XVI.  How was this clear teaching forgotten in 1965? This directly contradicts statements in Dignitatis Humanae] It spreads ruin in sacred and civil affairs, though some repeat over and over again with the greatest impudence that some advantage accrues to religion from it. “But the death of the soul is worse than freedom of error,” as Augustine was wont to say. When all restraints are removed by which men are kept on the narrow path of truth, their nature, which is already inclined to evil, propels them to ruin. Then truly “the bottomless pit” is open from which John saw smoke ascending which obscured the sun, and out of which locusts flew forth to devastate the earth. Thence comes transformation of minds, corruption of youths, contempt of sacred things and holy laws — in other words, a pestilence more deadly to the state than any other. Experience shows, even from earliest times, that cities renowned for wealth, dominion, and glory perished as a result of this single evil, namely immoderate freedom of opinion, license of free speech, and desire for novelty.

Now, however, We want you to rally to combat the abominable conspiracy against clerical celibacy. This conspiracy spreads daily and is promoted by profligate philosophers, some even from the clerical order. They have forgotten their person and office, and have been carried away by the enticements of pleasure. They have even dared to make repeated public demands to the princes for the abolition of that most holy discipline. But it is disgusting to dwell on these evil attempts at length. Rather, We ask that you strive with all your might Gregory_XVIto justify and to defend the law of clerical celibacy as prescribed by the sacred canons, against which the arrows of the lascivious are directed from every side. [I guess we can assume Kasper the Klown Kardinal doesn’t truck much with Gregory XVI, either]

Now the honorable marriage of Christians, which Paul calls “a great sacrament in Christ and the Church,”[Heb XIII:4] demands our shared concern lest anything contrary to its sanctity and indissolubility is proposed. [So clear, so easily understood……how have so many forgotten?]  Our predecessor Pius VIII would recommend to you his own letters on the subject. However, troublesome efforts against this sacrament still continue to be made. [Yes, they do] The people therefore must be zealously taught that a marriage rightly entered upon cannot be dissolved; for those joined in matrimony God has ordained a perpetual companionship for life and a knot of necessity which cannot be loosed except by death. [A marriage once rightly entered upon cannot be dissolved. Hear that, Synod?  Hear that, Kardinal Kasper?  Hear that, Archbishop Forte?] Recalling that matrimony is a sacrament and therefore subject to the Church, let them consider and observe the laws of the Church concerning it. Let them take care lest for any reason they permit that which is an obstruction to the teachings of the canons and the decrees of the councils. They should be aware that those marriages will have an unhappy end which are entered upon contrary to the discipline of the Church or without God’s favor or because of concupiscence alone, with no thought of the sacrament and of the mysteries signified by it.

———End Quote———

Great, great encyclical. I cannot encourage you enough to read the whole thing.  If you are like me, you will be both incredibly edified and incredibly depressed by doing so.  Edified by the wonderful content therein, depressed at the massive gulf that divides the care given to souls by holy men of the past and that which we are given today.  Pope Gregory XVI, you great pope, you holy man, you combatant against heresy and error, pray for us!  Pray for our Church!

God willing, I may post more from this mighty work of the Lord next week.

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Pray Novenas for Father Rodriguez! November 20, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, disaster, episcopate, error, General Catholic, Grace, Holy suffering, manhood, martyrdom, Novenas, persecution, priests, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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As most readers will know, Father Rodriguez is currently on sabbatical.  When placed on sabbatical, he asked that prayers be offered for his discernment and the future of his apostolate.  It was also announced that an effort at mass, joint Novenas would be made to that end.  The Novenas were just announced.  I give text of the announcement below, along with the prayers.  Please do pray for Father Rodriguez and the many afflicted souls formerly of his care in El Paso in this most trying time:

MANY THANKS to all who have been praying for Fr. Rodríguez. We have received many messages of encouragement, support and prayer.

- Tomorrow we will begin praying a continuous novena for Fr. Rodríguez, which will last until 10 May 2015. The current novena should always be at the PRAYER / CURRENT NOVENA tab from the website homepage (www.svfonline.org). It will also be accessible through the website’s calendar: http://svfonline.org/el-paso-

- Our first novena, appropriately enough given Father’s fervent Marian Devotion will be to Our Lady. This particular novena is to Our Lady of Remedy. We will pray it from Nov 21 – Nov 29. It is attached in .pdf format.—–>>>>Novena Our Lady Good Remedy

- The second novena will be the traditional Christmas Novena prayed for twenty-five days from the Feast of St. Andrew to Christmas Eve (Nov 30-Dec 24). It is also attached in .pdf format.—–>>>>Novena Christmas 2014 [You should be praying this Novena anyways!]

- Following the Feast of the Immaculate Conception (which is Father’s ordination anniversary), we will also begin to pray a 54 Day Rosary Novena. As soon as I have those files prepared in .pdf format, I will email them out as well.

———End Quote———

Thanks to St. Vincent Ferrer Foundation for sending this information out.  SVF also noted this sad development in Trier, Germany, which mirrors situations in El Paso, New York, and elsewhere:

The bishop of Trier in Germany has removed the parish priest of Beckingen from his parish, ostensibly for the reason provided in canon 1741 of the current Code of Canon Law, “a manner of acting which brings grave detriment or disturbance to ecclesiastical communion.” Wherein exactly the disturbance of communion consists is difficult to tell…….

……..What exactly “the obscure complaints” are remains unclear. Rorate Caeli interviewed one of the parishioners, who said that the complaints had to do with the pastor’s “too strict application of the diocesan guidelines on funerals,” and his practice of occasionally celebrating Mass ad orientem and of wearing the biretta on feast days.

Maybe the good father could find a place in Lincoln.

Beautiful Italian Crucifix miraculously survives church fire November 20, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Art and Architecture, disaster, General Catholic, Grace, Holy suffering, sadness, Society, Tradition, Virtue.
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Holy Cross Catholic Church in San Jose, California was gutted by fire on Saturday, but somehow this beautiful ornate Italian crucifix, ten feet tall, managed to escape damage:

san jose fire crucifix

 

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God bless the firefighters for treating this symbol of our Faith with such respect and care.  Would that similar care would have been taken during the orgy of destruction that afflicted so many treasures of art and great symbols of our Faith during the wild excesses of the post-conciliar period.

The video at this link will give you an idea of the extent of the damage.

Given the extent of the blaze it is miraculous that the crucifix survived.  It certainly appears the entire interior of the parish was consumed.

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Some more details in the video below.  What a beautiful crucifix, I am glad it could be saved, and apparently, virtually undamaged:

 

Brick by brick? Lincoln Cathedral to offer Mass Ad Orientem November 20, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, episcopate, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, Liturgy, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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It was announced recently that Bishop James Conley of Lincoln will have Mass offered Ad Orientem at the Cathedral of the Risen Christ in Lincoln, NE, during the upcoming season of Advent. Bishop Conley himself will offer Midnight Mass Ad Orientem, as well.  No, it’s not the TLM, it’s not in Latin, but it is a significant step in the right direction. I believe that Mass versus poplum is one of the most disordered and destructive changes made to the Liturgy in the wake of Vatican II.  I pray Bishop Conley will do as Bishop Slattery of Tulsa has done, and offer all episcopal Masses at the cathedral Ad Orientem:

During the Sundays of Advent, the priests in the Cathedral of the Risen Christ will celebrate the Mass ad orientem. With the People of God, the priest will stand facing the altar, and facing the crucifix. When I celebrate midnight Mass on Christmas, I will celebrate ad orientem as well. This may take place in other parishes across the Diocese of Lincoln as well.“

That is great.  Bishop Conley certainly seems to be following very much in Bishop Bruskewitz’ footsteps.  Bishop Conley has a strong relationship with the FSSP-Ordination-Virginia-14FSSP and its seminary, which resides in the Diocese of Lincoln.  He has officiated at many FSSP ordination Masses.  I find it heartening, too, that Bishop Conley implies that this change may not be limited to just the cathedral, but may be adopted at parishes, as well.  I pray this becomes the default method of offering Mass in Lincoln, and from there, to more and more dioceses!  May they follow Bishop Conley’s example!

Again, this is not the TLM, and it’s not permanent.  It is possible to be a naysayer with regard to this small but significant change.  As for me, I try to recognize improvements and positive developments as they occur, for the good they bring.  They may not represent all some may desire, they may even be problematic in some respects, but I try to applaud and approve all such moves in positive directions towards reverence and Tradition.  I have only been assisting at the TLM for a few years.  If I am a traddie, I have not been one for long. I try to keep in mind that a lot of people either aren’t where I’m at right now (and nor was I 5 years ago), or may not even have the wonderful options my family and I have in this area.  If a NO Mass in Latin is what works for them, or a reverent NO is the best they can find in their area, good for them and I pray they can continue to grow in the Faith.  Assisting at a NO Mass in Latin was a critical part of our path to the TLM, and I will always be grateful for the availability of that Mass and the priest who still offers it today.

I’m just trying to make a small point that we who are very serious about the Faith and very attracted to Tradition can forget sometimes – we were not always as we are now, we may look back on ourselves 5 or 10 years from now and think “Wow, I had a lot of growing to do,” and we should have generosity of understanding for all those who are walking the path but perhaps not at the same place we are right now.  That’s not to excuse error or damaging propositions when they arise, it’s just to try to recognize we’re not necessarily all that, we don’t necessarily have all the answers (just most – heh), and simply because someone else is at a little different place doesn’t mean they should be marginalized.

Hopefully, that makes some sense!

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Great news – Fr. Carota works a conversion using cassock power! November 19, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, catachesis, fun, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, manhood, priests, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Victory, Virtue.
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I love this post from Fr. Carota. It ties in very well with the post I did yesterday concerning the cassock-wearing Fr. Carney and how he publicly evangelizes by walking around town and engaging souls whose attention he attracts due to his traditional priestly garb:

A portable propane tank for the stove in my house leaked gas and needed the valve replaced.  So I took it in my van to a place that fills and repairs propane tanks.  The man who waited on me was Mexican.  He asked me if I was Catholic and he waved his hand, indicating the cassock I was wearing.  I told him, definitely.

He then went on to explain to me that he had studied all the religions of the world; buddhism, hinduism, Islam, mormon and protestantism.  He told me that the muslims would not allow him to come into their mosque or become muslim because he could not understand Arabic in which they pray and teach the koran.  They told him that they would be watching out for him on the surveillance cameras.

Then he told me that his mother was a good Catholic and that he had even been an altar boy.  The last thing he was into was the masons.  I informed him that the masons were behind the torturing and killing of the Cristeros in Mexico.  He had not heard of them. [I assume Father means the Cristeros]

I told him that I too had studied about the different religions and knew that the only true faith was the Catholic faith.  I invited him to come to the Holy Latin Mass at 8 am Sunday at St. Catherine’s.

He said he would fix the valve on the propane gas tank and fill it up.  But he told me I could not take it back in my van because the law prohibits caring a large propane tank in a car in case it leaks it would kill the people.  It has to be in a pickup.  He then took me into the owners office to see if anything could be done.  The owner was very kind and said they could deliver it the next day to my house.  When the tank was delivered this is what I joyfully received.  First the tank was newly painted, a cap was installed and a ribbon was on it.

What a wonderful surprise to receive the newly painted repaired propane tank, but most of all the note that he is coming to the Latin Mass on Sunday……

…..See what great things happen when we priests wear the traditional Catholic Cassock.  Be encouraged all of you priests who are ridiculed for wearing the cassock.  If only it save one soul and brings someone the the Holy Latin Mass, it well worth the ridicule and persecution you have received for wearing it. [Darn right. And if the world hates you, remember it hated Our Lord first, and know that you are blessed when you are persecuted for righteousness’ sake.]

Pics of the propane tank:

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I add this pic just because it is awesome:

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How long might we spend in Purgatory? November 19, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, disconcerting, Four Last Things, General Catholic, Holy suffering, mortification, reading, religious, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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How long might even very faithful souls spend in Purgatory? Fr. Schouppe, SJ, answers in his book.  I would not take the discourse below as a discouragement, and one could certainly argue with some of the assumptions made, but instead focus on our immense need we must feel of charity for the souls in Purgatory who depend on us for the alleviation of their suffering.  Certainly, what Fr. Schouppe explains below was the dominant belief in the Church in the latter half of the 19th century and for many other periods, as well.  Jansenism, you might say, but I think we would be most remiss to dismiss the probability of long stays in Purgatory for many of us.

Another key factor discussed below is our great need to do penance and works of mercy for the expiation of our own sins:virgen carmen animas

Father Mumford of the Company of Jesus, in his Treatise on Charity Towards the Departed, bases the long duration of Purgatory on a calculation of probability, which we shall give in substance. He goes on the principle that, according to the words of the Holy Ghost, The just man falls seven times a day (Prov XXIV:16),  that is to say, that even those who apply themselves most perfectly to the service of God, notwithstanding their good will, commit a great number of faults in the infinitely pure eyes of God. We have but to enter into our own conscience, and there analyze before God our thoughts, our words, and works, to be convinced of this sad effect of human misery.  Oh how easy it is to lack respect in prayer, to prefer our ease to the accomplishment of duty, to sin by vanity, by impatience, by sensuality, by uncharitable thoughts and words, by want of conformity to the Will of God!  The day is long; is it very difficult for even a virtuous soul to commit, I do not say seven, but twenty or thirty of 20130412-estampita_almas_del_purgatorio_santa_misathis kind of faults and imperfections?

Let us take a moderate estimate, and suppose that you commit about ten faults a day: at the end of 365 days, you will have the sum of 3650 faults. Let us diminish, and, to facilitate the calculation, place it at 3000 per year.  At the end of ten years this will amount to 30,000, and at the end of twenty years to 60,000. Suppose that of these 60,000 faults you have expiated half by penance and good works , there will still remain 30,000 to be atoned for.

Let us continue our hypothesis – if you die after these twenty years of virtuous life, and appear before God with a debt of thirty thousand faults, and each one of those faults requires an hour in Purgatory to expiate them………these 30,000 faults will mean three years, three months, and fifteen days in Purgatory.  Thus even a good Christian who watches over himself, who applies himself to penance and good works, finds himself liable for over three years in Purgatory.animas del purgatorio

The preceding calculation is based on an estimate which is lenient in the extreme.  Now, if you extend the duration of the pain, and, instead of an hour, you take a day for the expiation of a fault; if, instead of having nothing but venial sins, you bring before God a debt resulting form mortal sins, more or less numerous, which you formerly committed; if you assign, on the average, as St. Frances of Rome says, seven years for the expiation of one mortal sin, remitted as to the guilt, who does not see that we arrive at an appalling duration and that the expiation may easily be prolonged for many years, and even for centuries.

Years and centuries of torments!  Oh! if we only thought of it, with what care should we not avoid the least faults! with what fervor should we not practice penance to make satisfaction in the world! 

———-End Quote———

All I can say is, yikes. I have committed many egregious sins, and continue to do so today.  I fear I may spend a very, very long time in Purgatory.  Lord have mercy on me!  I fear Your just wrath!

How contrary is the above to popular presentations today about the afterlife?  How does the above, which was considered very mainstream theological guidance to lay people less than a century ago, square with what is taught in the vast majority of parishes and other Catholic outlets today?  How many instant canonizations have you been to?  How many souls are not being prayer for?

Oracion para que las animas del Purgatorio concedan una peticion

 

Great story about chaplain of Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles November 18, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in awesomeness, Basics, Ecumenism, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Latin Mass, manhood, priests, sanctity, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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I don’t know how much pub this story has gotten in orthodox Catholic circles but it’s a good one.  A priest recently assigned as chaplain for the great order of Benedictines of Mary, Queen of the Apostles in Missouri spends his time off walking around town in cassock and saturno, evangelizing souls he meets.  What great witness:54651d0500414.preview-300

Most afternoons, the Rev. Lawrence Carney can be found walking around St. Joseph. Dressed in black, carrying a crucifix and rosary, he can be hard to miss.

“The name of St. Joseph being one of the three of the Holy Family, a nun and I thought this would be a good town to allow me to walk around and pray,” the Rev. Carney says. “I think God has lots of ideas in mind for this idea of walking around and being a visible sign of the church, as kind of a missionary.”

The Rev. Carney moved to St. Joseph from Wichita, Kan., in January, where he had served as a pastor with the Diocese of Wichita.

“I was invited by the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles to be their chaplain,” the Rev. Carney says. “From there, I asked if I could live in a city and pray the rosary around the town and meet people along the way. If they wanted to talk about God, I would help them.” [The prayers of holy nuns are so vital to the success of priestly apostolates.  The collapse in women’s religious life has wounded the Church more than we can know in this life.  I know one very holy priest who believes very strongly that every good priest requires what he calls “a little girl” or two praying in a convent somewhere for his sanctity and the success of his apostolate. I think he’s right.]

The Rev. Carney spends part of his day with the nuns of Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles in Gower, Mo., saying Mass and praying. Afterward, he returns to St. Joseph to walk, pray and attend Mass at St. Patrick’s Church, where he is staying.…..

…….While he walks in St. Joseph, the Rev. Carney prays the rosary and talks to people he meets.

“A lot of time, people want me to pray for them, for their general intentions, sicknesses or conversion. And then I teach them how to pray,” he says. “They ask about God and Jesus and Mary.” [Wonderful evangelization right there]

54651d04a7580.preview-300He doesn’t have a set route, but he enjoys visiting the soup kitchen and listening to people. While he walks, he carries a crucifix in his right hand and a rosary in his left, an act he calls “fishing.”

“One guy came up to me and said, ‘What are you doing?’ I said, ‘I’m fishing. The crucifix is my hook, my rosary is my line. Allow me to put the rosary around your neck.’ He allowed me, and I said, ‘You’ve just been caught by Jesus,’” the Rev. Carney says. [Corny, but cool]

Later, he saw the man again while walking. 

“A month later, I walked by, and there was like 20 kids and they all wanted to ask me, talk about questions of God. This young man just runs out of his house and says, ‘Father Carney, I want a rosary.’ I gave him a rosary. I blessed it and taught him how to pray it,” he says…….

……He wears a sacramental black robe, called a cassock, which represents the tunic the priests wore in the Old Testament. He also wears an Italian hat called a saturno, which means “half a Saturn.” It helps keep the sun out of his eyes and protect his face from sun damage.

“We stick to tradition. This hat was required by all clerics who lived in Rome. It was against the law not to wear one until several decades ago. It’s very fitting to the priesthood because it’s what we used to wear all the time,” he says.

 

————End Quote———–

There is quite a bit more at the link.  I think it fair to say that the coverage is quite positive.

So this is what comes of giving visible witness to our Faith through the wearing of clerical garb in public. I am always so pleased to see priests dressed as priests in public.  Of course, I strongly favor the cassock and other traditional wear as being most well ordered and most evocative of our Faith.  This priest’s experience seems to stress that being identifiable as a priest in public stirs people’s minds and imaginations and may have an impact beyond quantifying. I really endorse this kind of witness.

The walking is also brilliant, you can’t evangelize very well from a car, but on foot, the interactions are much more personal.  I really pray bishops give priests time in their schedules to perform these kinds of ad hoc apostolates, they may not have an immediately visible return but they could have enormous impact over time.  I’d say this kind of mission is of more benefit to souls than the myriad meetings priests seem to spend half or more of their time sitting in.  Or even less edifying activities.  I knew one priest who, from his constant talking about different TV shows including many daytime ones, obviously spent a great deal of time watching the tube.

May God support and protect Father Carney.

 

 

 

Model for true ecumenism – Saint Josephat November 14, 2014

Posted by Tantumblogo in Basics, catachesis, Ecumenism, episcopate, General Catholic, Glory, Grace, Liturgical Year, manhood, martyrdom, persecution, Saints, sanctity, scandals, Tradition, true leadership, Virtue.
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In the traditional liturgical calendar, today is the feast of the great Saint Josaphat, the man who understood true ecumenism as union with the Catholic Faith and saw to it that countless numbers of souls were returned to Her bosom.  I write his biography as contained in the Roman Martyrology, I wish I had more time:

Josaphat Kuncewicz was born of noble Catholic parents at Vladimir in Volhynia.  When a child, as he was listening to his mother telling him about the Passion of Christ, a dart issued from the image of Jesus crucified and sounded him in the heart.  Set on fire with the love of God, he began to devote himself with such zeal to prayer and other works of piety, that he was the admiration and the model of his older companions.  At the age of twenty he became a monk under the Rule of Saint Basil, and made wonderful progress in evangelical perfection.  He went barefoot even in the severe winter of that country; he never ate meat, drank wine only when obliged by obedience, and wore a rough hair-shirt until his death. The flower of his chastity, which he had vowed in early youth to the Virgin Mother of God  he preserved unspotted. He soon became so renowned for virtue and learning, that in spite of his youth he was made superior of the monastery of Byten; soon afterwards he became archimandrite of Vilna; and lastly, much against his will, but to the great joy of Catholics, he was chosen archbishop of Polotsk.

In this dignity he relaxed nothing of his former manner of life; and had nothing so much at heart as the divine service and the salvation of the sheep entrusted to him.  He energetically defended Catholic faith and unity, and labored to the utmost of his power to bring back schismatics and heretics to communion with he See of blessed Peter.  The Sovereign Pontiff and the plenitude of his power he never ceased to defend, both by preaching and by writings full of piety and learning, against he most shameless calumnies and errors of the wicked.  He vindicated episcopal rights, and restored ecclesiastical possessions which had been seized by laymen.  Incredible was the number of heretics he won back to the bosom of mother Church; and the words of the Popes bear witness how greatly he promoted the union of the Greek and Latin churches. His revenues were entirely expended in restoring the beauty of God’s house, in building dwellings for consecrated virgins, and in other pious works. So bountiful was he to the poor, that, on one occasion, having nothing wherewith to supply the needs of a certain widow, he ordered his Omophorion, or episcopal pallium, to be pawned. [How many bishops today possess such charity?  Heck, any of us?  Would I pawn my most sacred possession to help someone in need?]

The great progress made by the Catholic Faith so stirred up the hatred of wicked men against the soldier of Christ, that they determined to put him to death.  he knew what was threatening him; and foretold it when preaching to the people. As he was making his pastoral visitation at Vitebsk, the murderers broke into his house, striking and wounding all whom they found. Josaphat meekly went to meet them, and accosted them kindly, saying: “My little children, why do you strike my servants? If you have any complaint against me, here I am.”  Hereupon they rushed on him, overwhelmed him with blows, pierced him with their spears, and at length dispatched him with an axe and threw his body into the river. This took place on the twelfth of November, 1623, in the forty-third year of his age.  His body, surrounded with a miraculous light, was rescued from the waters.  The martyr’s blood won a blessing first of all for his murderers; for, being condemned to death, they nearly all abjured their schism and repented of their crime.  As the death of this great bishop was followed by many miracles, Pope Urban VIII granted him the honors of beatification.  On the third of the Kalends of July, 1867, when celebrating the centenary of the princes of the apostles, Pius IX in the Vatican basilica, in the presence of the College of Cardinals, and of about five hundred patriarchs, metropolitans, and bishops of every rite, assembled from all parts of the world, solemnly enrolled among the Saints this great defender of the Church’s unity, who was the first Oriental to be thus honored. Pope Leo XIII extended his Mass and Office to the universal Church.

———End Quote——–

The sad tale is that Saint Josaphat’s enormously successful efforts to bring Ruthenian Orthodox into the Church, which by the time of his death had resulted in many hundreds of thousands returning to unity, were later squandered by political machinations and a substantial share fell back to Orthodoxy.  As Dom Prosper Gueranger notes, this repression of the “uniate” Greek Catholics by Polish Latin Catholics hastened – or may have directly caused – the later collapse of the Polish-Lithuanian Empire and the subjugation of all its territories to Orthodox Russia and protestant Prussia.  Oh how short sighted men are!  Such a glorious reunion, purchased at the price of a martyr’s blood, wasted due to worldly ambitions and short sighted prejudice.

Thankfully several million did remain in union with the See of Peter and they persist today, greatly increased, as Greek Catholics in western Ukraine, parts of Romania and Poland, and scattered about in other locales.  Saint Josaphat was a model of true ecumenism, not the false variety bandied about today, and should be a model for all future efforts are union with schismatic Churches.

 

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